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ThoughtCouture View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote ThoughtCouture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:08pm
Originally posted by coconess coconess wrote:

are you not supposed to tip in europe..? 
i felt like it was hella expensive… but i still tipped. 

i didnt know they got paid more out there… 


 
that's why i was asking.  not that i ever plan on going over there...lol
 
so maybe they get paid more and you only tip when you get EXCEPTIONAL service.  and ONLY if you feel like it.


Edited by ThoughtCouture - Jun 29 2014 at 9:09pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote coconess Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:11pm
Originally posted by JamCaygirl JamCaygirl wrote:

It used to be a societal norm for black folk to sit at the back of the bus....

thankfully action was taken and progression was made....

and people didnt just sit around and wait for the government to do something about it....

Confused

well…. i think ill go get some work done at this juncture.. 


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Lol Jam I think you took it a wee bit top far lol.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DiorShowGirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:11pm
Originally posted by Wildfire Wildfire wrote:

people tip beauticians? never heard of this strange thing.
while I understand (dont agree --i shouldn't feel obligated to tip, even for good service. Youre getting paid)what Ricky is saying about the service being somewhat separate from the food cost....
... at the salon, I pay you for a service...why am i tipping you again on top of that??



the beautician who does your hair doesn't get the whole 200 to whatever it cost to get your hair done right? do those beauticians have to pay for their station area to work at? my daughter was having a fit not wanting to tip the beautician and i told her just give her a little something..\


now if u r working out of your home u ain't getting crap..u already getting the full amount of whatever u r charging and u think u r getting a tip on top of that amount???Confused
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JamCaygirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:13pm

Asia

China

In China, traditionally there is no tipping (except Hong Kong and Macau). However, hotels that routinely serve foreign tourists allow tipping. An example would be tour guides and associated drivers.[7]

Hong Kong

In Hong Kong, tipping is not expected in budget restaurants. Mid-scale restaurants typically add a 10% service charge although it is not given to the wait staff. However, people might leave the small change left over after paying the bill or tip as a compliment for exceptional service.

India

Four cycle rickshaws in India.

Tipping is acceptable but not expected in India. Mostly tipping in employment is given once in a year unofficially to all those who provide service, by the end user as well as employer.

For example, tips may be given during Diwali to watchmen, news paper delivery, laundry, postmen and other service staff by most people annually. Tipping taxi and rickshaw drivers is rare and not expected. Tipping in restaurant or hotel is most common at 1% to 5% of actual amount and tips are not part of the salary.

Israel

In Israel, tipping in restaurants and bars is expected, usually 10%-15% service charge.[citation needed]

Japan

A rickshaw operator pulls two guests near Kyoto.

In Japan, tipping is not a part of the culture. Japanese people are uncomfortable with being tipped, and are likely to be confused, amused or possibly even offended if tipped.[8]

Jordan

In Jordan, tipping is part of the culture, and it has always been used in restaurants, hotels, taxis, hookah lounges, coffee shops and bars; and it is expected if you are a regular, though bars and restaurants may add 5-35% service charge. It is called a tip or baksheesh (Arabic: ْبقشيش), which used to be given to laborers in advance to get better service, or afterwards as an extra reward for their work. It is both illegal and an insult to tip in public and government offices, the police, and the military.[citation needed]

Malaysia

Tipping is not customary in Malaysia, although guests may pay a little more at their discretion, especially if the service has been particularly good. In established restaurants there is a mandatory 6% government tax and often an additional 10% service charge on receipts.[citation needed]

Singapore

In Singapore, tipping is not common. Bars and restaurants typically add a 10% service charge although it is not given to the wait staff. Tips are seldom given in a Hawker centre, coffee shop, or taxi.[9]

South Korea

In South Korea tipping is not customary at restaurants, hotels or for taxi service, but is appreciated. The Koreans are getting more familiar with the tipping custom now.[citation needed]

Taiwan

In Taiwan, tipping is not customary, but all mid and high end restaurants include a mandatory "10% service charge", which is not given to the service staff, but rather considered by Taiwanese law as general revenue, as reported by the Taipei Times in "False Gratuity" on July 9, 2013.

Thailand

In Thailand a small tip is often left in restaurants. Taking back small change if you pay with a large bill is somewhat rude. For example if a meal is 950 baht, and one pays with a 1000 baht note, the remaining 50 baht can be left. A strict percentage is not needed.

Turkey

In Turkey, tipping, or bahşiş (lit. gift, from Persian word بخشش, often rendered in English as "baksheesh") is usually optional and not customary in many places. However, a tip of 5-10% is expected in restaurants, which is usually paid by "leaving the change". Cab drivers usually do not expect to be tipped, though passengers may round up the fare. A tip of small change may be made to a hotel porter.[10]

Europe

Albania

Buskers often punctuate their performances with requests for tips.

Tipping (bakshish) in Albania is very much expected almost everywhere. In recent times it has become more common as many foreigners and Albanians living abroad visit Albania. Leaving a tip of around 10% of the bill is customary in restaurants; even porters, guides and chauffeurs expect tips. If you don't want to leave money for porters, bellhops and the like, duty-free alcohol is often very welcome – but this must be doled out with discretion, as some people (such as Muslims) may actually find it offensive.[11]

Belgium

Tips (fooi or pourboire) are not expected in Belgium. When tipping in pubs/restaurant, it will mostly be a simple round up to the nearest integer.[citation needed]

Bosnia

Tips (bakšiš, napojnica) are not expected in cafes and casual restaurants- especially not from people not earning their own money i.e. students. However, tips are welcome if the service was good- for example if it included free refills or a favor like giving tourist information. Tips between 10%-20% are excepted in more expensive restaurants and hotels. If guests wants to tip they either pay the price plus desired tip and say "taman" (no change) or specify how much money they want back if paying with a large bill.[citation needed]

Croatia

Tips (napojnica, manča, tip) are sometimes expected, mostly in restaurants – but they are not mandatory. Restaurant tip is around 3-5%[12] (or more if you are really satisfied with overall dining experience). In clubs or cafe bars, on the other hand, it is common to "round up the bill". It is not common to tip taxi drivers or hairdressers, but it's up to you.

In tourist countries such as Croatia and Singapore, tips can "open a lot of doors" and surely will leave a good impression, which will be recognized on your next visit.

Czech Republic

Tips (spropitné, dýško,tringelt) are optional but welcome in taxis, restaurants, and similar services; this usually involves rounding up the bill to the next multiple of ten korun. Payments with credit cards are never tipped. According to Czech law, service must be always included in the bill, however the tip must not be. In Prague and some other cities often visited by the foreigners there are often adapted Western practices and tips about 10% are expected, but not required.[citation needed]

Denmark

Tips (drikkepenge, lit. "drinking money") are not required in Denmark since service charges are automatically added to the bill. Tipping for outstanding service is a matter of choice, but is not expected.[13]

Finland

Tips are not at all expected in Finland since any service charges must be included in the bill by law. However, people might leave the small change left over after paying the bill or tip as a compliment for exceptional service.

France

Tips (pourboires) are not expected in France since service charges are included in the bill. However, French people occasionally leave the small change left after paying the bill or one or two euros if they were satisfied with the service quality in some contexts, such as restaurants, hairdressers, deliveries, ...[citation needed]

Germany and Austria

Coat check staff are usually tipped for their service.

Tipping is not seen as obligatory, as it is in the United States. In the case of waiting staff, and in the context of a debate about a minimum wage, some people disapprove of tipping and say that it should not substitute for employers paying a good basic wage. But most people in Germany consider tipping to be good manners as well as a way to express gratitude for good service.

It is illegal, and rarely done, to charge a service fee without the customer's consent. But a tip of about 5% - 10%, depending on the type of service, is customary. For example a German usually tips the waiter but almost never the cashier at a big supermarket. As a rule of thumb the more personal the service, the more common is tipping for it. Payments by card can include the tip too, but the tip is usually paid in cash when the card is handed over.

At times, rather than tipping individually, a tipping box will be arranged, and often the money is said to be given for a good cause[clarification needed]. Rounding up the bill in Germany is commonplace, sometimes with the comment stimmt so ("keep the change"),[14] rather than asking for all the change and leaving the tip afterwards. Or the customer says how much he will pay in total, including the tip: thus if the basic price is €10.50, the customer might, rather generously but not unusually, say zwölf ("twelve"), pay with a €20 note and get €8 in change. When paying a small amount, it is common to round up to the nearest euro (e.g. €1.80 to €2.00). A pool of service companies actually uses this for their marketing strategy: Aufrunden bitte[15] ("round up please") and the difference goes to a good cause[clarification needed].

Greece

In Greece tipping ("Φιλοδώρημα", transl. filodórima, or the loanword "πουρμπουάρ" from French pourboire) is commonplace, but not mandatory. Usually an amount on top of the small change left after paying the bill is left on the table in restaurants or bars. There is no set formula as to the proper amount, but for a large bill the tip is usually larger as well. The setting is also a factor; for instance, dining at an upscale establishment would merit more consideration to the tip than simply having coffee at a café. Common tips for a fast-food delivery may be up to 1 or 2 euros, for a large restaurant order it may be up to 10 or 20 euros but usually not larger.[citation needed]

Hungary

Strippers are often tipped after their performances.

The Hungarian word for tip is borravaló (literally "money for wine", a loose calque from German: Trinkgeld) or colloquially baksis (from Persian: بخششbakhshesh[16]), often written in English as backsheesh. Tipping is widespread in Hungary, the degree of expectation and the expected amount varies with price, type and quality of service, also influenced by the satisfaction of the customer.[17]

Depending on the situation, tipping might be unusual, optional, expected or obligatory. Similarly, some employers calculate into the wage that the employee would receive tips, while others prohibit accepting them. In some cases a tip is only given if the costumer is satisfied, in others it is customary to give a given percentage regardless the quality of the service, and there are situations when it is hard to tell the difference from a bribe. Widespread tipping based on loosely defined customs and its almost boundaryless transition into bribery is considered a main factor contributing to corruption. A particular Hungarian case of gratuity is hálapénz ("gratitude money") or paraszolvencia, which is the very much expected – almost obligatory though illegal – tipping of state-employed physicians (Hungary's healthcare system is almost completely state-run and there is an obligatory social insurance system).

Iceland

In Iceland tipping (þjórfé, lit. "serving money") is not customary and never expected.[18]

Ireland

Although it has been cited that tipping for taxis is typical,[19] it is not common in practice.

Italy

Tips (la mancia) are not customary in Italy, and used only if a special service is given or as thanks for high quality service.[20] Almost all restaurants (with the notable exception of those in Rome)[21] have a price for the service (called coperto) and waiters do not expect a tip but will not refuse it, especially if given by foreign customers. In cafés, bars, and pubs it's not uncommon, on paying the bill, to leave the change saying to the waiter or to the cashier "tenga il resto" ("keep the change"). Recently tip jars near the cash register are becoming widespread,[citation needed] however in public restrooms they are often forbidden.[22] Leaving the change is also quite common with taxi drivers. When using a credit card, it is not possible to add manually an amount to the bill, so it is possible to leave some coins as a tip.[citation needed]

The Netherlands

Small tips are expected in the Netherlands. When tipping in pubs/restaurant, it will mostly be a simple round up to the nearest integer. Service is included in the given prices and rates, but leaving a 5-10% tip is considered a kind gesture. In some bars and restaurants the workers collect all tips in a jar ("fooienpot") of which each employee gets an equal share.[citation needed]

Norway

Tipping is commonly not expected but is often practiced as a remark of high quality service or as a kind gesture. Tipping is most often done by leaving small change at the table or rounding up the bill.[citation needed]

Poland

Tipping in Poland is not obligatory and expected mostly at restaurants with a table service. The amount depends on the quality of the service, and is 10% or more when it was good. Taxi drivers may be often tipped small amounts, to avoid waiting for the change. Government workers (policemen, doctors) will often refuse taking a tip, which might be considered a bribery. It is, however, common practice to leave flowers or sweets for doctors, nurses or teachers on certain occasions (such as leaving the hospital or school).[citation needed]

Portugal

In Portugal tipping ("gorjeta")is mainly customary in restaurants, taxis, food delivery services, hair sallons and home repair services. Tips are not given based on percentages and are usually small.[citation needed]

Romania

The tip (bacşiş) is usually 10% of the bill and is expected in restaurants,[23] coffee shops, and taxis.[23]

Slovakia

Tipping is optional and its percentage usually expresses level of satisfaction with a service. Tips (sprepitné) in restaurants, bars and taxis are around 10%. When paying with a credit card tip in form of a cash money is left on the table together with a signed bill.[citation needed]

Slovenia

Tipping is not common in Slovenia and most locals don't tip other than to round up to the nearest Euro. Recently, areas visited by a large amount of tourists have begun to accept tips at around 10 - 20%.[24][25]

Spain

Tipping ("propina") is customary but not generally considered mandatory in Spain and depends on the quality of the service received. In restaurants the amount of the tip, if any, depends mainly on the economic status of the customer and on the kind of locale, higher percentages being expected in upscale restaurants. In bars and small restaurants, Spaniards sometimes leave as a tip the small change left in their plate after paying a bill.[26][27] Outside the restaurant business, some service providers, such as taxicab drivers, hairdressers and hotel personnel may expect a tipping in an upscale setting. In 2007 the Minister of Economy Pedro Solbes put the blame on the excessive tipping for the increase of the inflation.[28]

Switzerland

15% service has been included in menu prices and hence in the bill in Switzerland by law since 1985. Hence tipping is not expected, although it is common for a customer to round-up the bill to the nearest franc for a small amount, or to add a couple of francs (certainly not 10%) to a larger bill.[citation needed] Anything left in addition is a compliment for great service, but not expected.[citation needed]

Sweden

Tipping is commonly not expected but is practiced as a remark of high quality service or as a kind gesture. Tipping is most often done by leaving small change at the table or rounding up the bill. This is mostly done at restaurants (less often if payment is done at the desk) and in taxi cabs (some taxis are very expensive as there is free pricing, so they might not be tipped). Less often hairdressers are tipped.[29]

United Kingdom

Golfers often tip the caddies who carry their golf clubs.

Tips of 10% are common in restaurants, but not compulsory. It is a legal requirement to include all taxes and other obligatory charges in the prices displayed. Service charges, which may be expressed as discretionary (although it is very unusual to refuse to pay) or mandatory, are sometimes levied, more often in London and other large cities than in other areas. If a restaurant customer feels the service or product inadequate, he must only pay what he feels is fair value: the restaurant may contest it in court if it chooses, but the customer cannot pay nothing, he must pay what he feels is fair value.[30]

The service charge may be included in the bill or added separately. 12.5% is reported as a common amount.[31]

Tipping for other services such as taxis and hairdressers is not expected, but tips are often given to reward good service. In some large cities it is customary to tip both taxi drivers and hairdressers/barbers.[citation needed]

A tronc is an arrangement for the pooling and distribution to employees of tips, gratuities and/or service charges in the hotel and catering trade. The person who distributes monies from the tronc is known as the troncmaster. When a tronc exists in the UK, responsibility for deducting pay-as-you-earn taxes from the distribution may lie with the troncmaster rather than the employer.[32][33] (The word 'tronc' has its origins in the French for collecting box.) In June 2008, the Employment Appeals Tribunal ruled that income from a tronc cannot be counted when assessing whether a wage or salary meets the national minimum wage as a test case Revenue and Customs Commissioners v Annabel’s (Berkeley Square) Ltd.

North America and The Caribbean

Tipping is customary in restaurants offering traditional table service. The amount of a tip is ultimately at the discretion of the patron. In buffet-style restaurants where the waiter brings only beverages, 10% is customary.[34]

Canada

Tipping is practiced in Canada in a similar manner to United States. Quebec provides alternate minimum wage schedule for all tipped employees. Some other provinces allow alternate minimum wage schedule for "liquor servers".[35]

According to Wendy Leung from The Globe and Mail, it is a common practice in restaurants to have servers share their tips with other restaurant employees, a process called "tipping out."[36] Another newspaper refers to this as a tip pool.[37]

"Tipping out the house (the restaurant) is occasionally explained as a fee for covering breakage or monetary error[s]."[37]

A Member of the Ontario Provincial Parliament, Michael Prue, has introduced a Bill in the Ontario Legislature regarding tipping.[38]

Mexico

A taxi driver waiting for customers

Workers in small, economy restaurants usually do not expect a significant tip.[39] However, tipping in Mexico is common in larger, medium and higher end restaurants. It is customary in these establishments to tip not less than 10% but not more than 15% of the bill as a voluntary offering for good service based on the total bill before value added tax,[40] "IVA" in English, VAT. Value added tax is already included in menu or other service industry pricing since Mexican Consumer Law requires the exhibition of final costs for the customer. Thus, the standard tip in Mexico is 11.5% of the pre-tax bill which equates to 10% after tax in most of the Mexican territory, except in special lower tax stimulus economic zones.[40][41]

Gratuity may be added to the bill without the customer's consent, contrary to the law,[42] either explicitly printed on the bill, or by more surreptitious means alleging local custom, in some restaurants, bars, and night clubs. However, in 2012, officials began a campaign to eradicate this increasingly rampant and abusive practice not only due to it violating Mexican consumer law, but also because frequently it was retained by owners or management.

If a service charge for tip ("propina" or "restaurant service charge") is added, it is a violation of Article 10 of the Mexican Federal Law of the Consumer and Mexican authorities recommend patrons require management to refund or deduct this from their bill. Additionally, in this 2012 Federal initiative to eliminate the illegal add-ons, the government clarified that contrary even to the belief of many Mexicans, that the Mexican legal definition of tips ("propinas") require it be discretionary to pay so that an unsatisfied client is under no obligation to pay anything to insure the legal definition of a tip is consistent with the traditional, cultural definition, and going as far to encourage all victims subject to the increasing illicit practice report the establishments to the PROFECO, the Office of the Federal Prosecutor for the Consumer, for prosecution.[43]

United States

A server at Luzmilla's restaurant.

Tipping is a widely practiced social custom in the United States. In restaurants, a gratuity of 15% to 20% of the amount of a customer’s check is customary when good service is provided.[44] Tips are also generally given for services provided in golf courses, casino, hotels, food delivery, taxis, and salons.[45] This etiquette applies to bar service at weddings and any other event where one is a guest as well. The host should provide appropriate tips to workers at the end of an event; the amount may be negotiated in the contract.[46]

The Fair Labor Standards Act defines tippable employees as individuals who customarily and regularly receive tips of $30 or more per month. Federal law permits employers to include tips towards satisfying the difference between employees' hourly wage and minimum wage, although some states and territories provide more generous provisions for tipped employees. For example, laws in Alaska, California, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Guam specify that employees must be paid the full minimum wage of that state/territory (which is equal or higher than the federal minimum wage in these instances) before tips are considered.[47]

A tip pool cannot be allocated to employers, or to employees who do not customarily and regularly receive tips. These non-eligible employees include dishwashers, cooks, chefs, and janitors.[48]

Until the early 20th century, Americans viewed tipping as inconsistent with the values of an egalitarian, democratic society.[49] Also, proprietors regarded tips as equivalent to bribing an employee to do something that was otherwise forbidden, such as tipping a waiter to get an extra large portion of food.[49] The introduction of Prohibition in 1919 had an enormous impact on hotels and restaurants, who lost the revenue of selling alcoholic beverages. The resulting financial pressure caused proprietors to welcome tips, as a way of supplementing employee wages.[50]

In spite of the trend toward tipping as obligatory behavior, six states, mainly in the South, passed laws that made tipping illegal. Enforcement of anti-tipping laws was problematic.[49] The earliest of these laws was passed in 1909 (Washington), and the last of these laws was repealed in 1926 (Mississippi).[49]

Government employees

The US Government recognizes tips as allowable expenses for federal employee travel.[51] However, US law prohibits federal employees from receiving tips under Standards of Ethical Conduct. Asking for, accepting or agreeing to take anything of value that influences the performance of an official act is generally not allowed. [1][52]

The Caribbean

Tipping in the Caribbean varies from island to island. In the Dominican Republic, restaurants add a 10% gratuity and it is customary to tip an extra 10%. In St. Barths, it is expected that you tip 10% to 15% if gratuity isn't already included.[53]

Taxation

Research by tax authorities finds that consistent tax evasion by waitstaff due to fraudulent declaration is a concern in US and Canada. In both countries, tip is a taxable income like any other form of earned income.

United States
Hair stylists are among the service workers who are often tipped for their service.

Tips are considered income. The entire tip amount is treated as earned wages are, with the exception of months in which tip income was under $20.[54] According to the IRS, at least 40% of tips to waiters are not reported for taxation.[55]

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ThoughtCouture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:13pm
Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

Originally posted by ms_wonderland ms_wonderland wrote:

and to add, tipping goes back centuries.  So it's not just about Corp greed...but they are exploiting tipping to get out of doing what's right. 


In America it mostly is.
I said it's a social custom AND corps fuking everybody.
Not every country tips...

At the end of the day it's only a small percentage of the bill.
But I see nothing wrong with ppl wondering or questioning why it's done here
 
yes...i don't mind them asking.  but when they find out the workers are being paid minimally with the expectation that the wage diff will be made up in tips....and then they further reflect and realize the cost of the meal doesn't nearly compare to where they are from....uh...duh.
 
now for the people who are from here...Sleepy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JamCaygirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:14pm
Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

Lol Jam I think you took it a wee bit top far lol.



Yeah I was laughing when I wrote itLOLLOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ThoughtCouture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:14pm
Originally posted by coconess coconess wrote:

Originally posted by JamCaygirl JamCaygirl wrote:

It used to be a societal norm for black folk to sit at the back of the bus....

thankfully action was taken and progression was made....

and people didnt just sit around and wait for the government to do something about it....

Confused

well…. i think ill go get some work done at this juncture.. 


 
 
lmaoooo ok.  bye james!LOLCryDead
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote ms_wonderland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:15pm
Originally posted by JamCaygirl JamCaygirl wrote:

It used to be a societal norm for black folk to sit at the back of the bus....

thankfully action was taken and progression was made....

and people didnt just sit around and wait for the government to do something about it....

I am not against taking a stand but eating out is just too much a part of everyday life...ppl would rather walk than cook.  This is America where we work more, vacation less.  Ppl don't want to come home and cook.  Not saying ppl don't cook at all just saying for something to change it would take statewide and nationwide action...there's just not enough ppl who would be willing to sacrifice.  And big diff between one person leaving the job bc they think it's b.s. and thousands unemployed all at once.


Edited by ms_wonderland - Jun 29 2014 at 9:18pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ThoughtCouture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 9:16pm
Originally posted by JamCaygirl JamCaygirl wrote:

There is a reason Americans are know worldwide for being big tippers, whilst Europeans are not...

Its just more entrenched in your societies , not so much in Europe

please excuse the generalisations tho
 
are the service workers in restaurants there paid fairly or not?????????????????
 
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