Black Hair Media Forum Homepage
BHM BHM BHM
Forum Home Forum Home > Natural Hair Care > Natural Hair Care
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Visual example's of textures and types COMPLETE!
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login
Perfect Hair Collection
 

Visual example's of textures and types COMPLETE!

 
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 21>




The Best Human Hair Available with No Service Match

Author
 Rating: Topic Rating: 9 Votes, Average 4.56  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Lilnicka4u2nv View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 29 2007
Location: New Yawk
Status: Offline
Points: 148821
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (7) Thanks(7)   Quote Lilnicka4u2nv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Visual example's of textures and types COMPLETE!
    Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 12:14am

To start off lets read a break down of each and everyone...


   Hair Types


We come in all shapes, sizes and colors... and our hair comes in all shapes, widths and textures. It is difficult to categorize hair because of all the variation that occurs. However, attempts have been made to categorize in an effort to help people better know their hair.

Black/afro-type hair is difficult to categorize for a few reasons:

1) our hair differs in pattern - coils, springs. zig zags, s-curves

2) our hair differs in pattern size - watch spring to chalk size

3) our hair differs in density - sparse, dense

4) our hair differs in strand diameter - fine, medium, coarse

5) our hair differs in feel - cottony, spongy,silky,thready,wiry




Strand Size/Diameter:

To get the hair strand size, take a piece of sewing thread and unravel it into two pieces. Compare this to your hair.  If the strand of hair is the same thickness as the thread then you have medium/normal size.  If it’s thicker than the thread, you have a thick strand.  If it’s thinner than the thread, you have a fine strand.

Texture:

Thready-  hair has a low sheen, with a high shine while the hair is being held taught with low frizz.  Wets easily but dries quickly.

Wiry – has a sparkly sheen with low shine and low frizz. Water bounces or beads up on the hair strand.  Hair never seems to get fully wet.

Cottony – has a low sheen, a high shine if hair is held taut and has high frizz.  Absorbs water quickly but does not get thoroughly wet very fast.

Spongy – high sheen, with low shine with a compacted looking frizz.  Absorbs water before it gets thoroughly wet.

Silky – low sheen and very high shine with a lot or low frizz.  Easily wets in water.

The trick is to hold your hair taut when determining spongy vs cottony.  So what does “sheen” & “shiny” mean?   Sheen is a dull reflection of light like a luster, the hair sparkles as light bounces off of it.  Shine has a sharp reflection of light (like the shine of straight hair or a shine of jewelry as an exaggeration).  Here are two pictures of examples of sheen vs shine:

This is hair w/ a SHEEN when held taut.

This is hair w/ SHINE when held taut.

Pattern:

The letters LOIS describes the curl pattern if it in those shapes of the letters.

L = I shaped strands (Hair has bends, right angles and folds with little to no curve)

O = round circular coils (Strands looks like a slinky, spirals or zeros)

I = straight with angular sharp bends (Hair lies mostly flat with no distinctive curve or bend)

S = s curls (Hair shaped like the letter S, wavy looking)

 


Porosity & Dew Point

Porosity

There is a great article which I found article written by Tonya McKay.  She explains porosity and what it means in great detail.  I’ll repost it in its entirety.

Porosity is the term used in the science of hair care to describe how easily water and other matter can diffuse back and forth through the cuticle layer and into or out of the cortex. Hair is much like a sponge, capable of absorbing water and other substances from the environment, and also susceptible to losing precious moisture and lipids to the environment. Maintaining an optimal balance of moisture in your hair preserves its suppleness, strength, and shine. This is especially important for those of us with curly hair, as it greatly influences the health and beauty of our tresses.


Porosity Classifications

The individual scales of the cuticle overlap one another like the feathers of a bird or scales on a fish. This amazing system of flexible and responsive scales allows diffusion of oils and moisture into and out of the hair as needed. Porosity is determined by how tightly the cuticle scales adhere to the surface of the hair shaft and also by how thoroughly adjacent scales overlap one another.

Low Porosity: Hair described as having low porosity is characterized by a very tightly bound cuticle layer, where the individual cuticle scales lie flat and overlap one another. Low porosity hair is often quite shiny, especially if it is a darker color. Overall this type of hair is considered to be quite healthy. If your hair repels water when you attempt to wet it, that is a good indication that it has low porosity. It can be quite difficult to process, because it resists penetration of the chemicals being used.

Low porosity hair is more prone to an excessive accumulation of protein if deep conditioning products are used and will feel very stiff and straw-like. It requires products rich in moisture and emollients and also benefits most from products that contain humectants, which attract moisture to the hair and hold it there. If hair with very few or very small openings becomes dry for some reason, it can be more difficult to restore proper moisture balance to it. In this case, a deep conditioning treatment with moderate heat would be a good way to ensure the cuticle is sufficiently opened up to allow moisture to enter into the cortex.

Normal Porosity: Hair possessing average porosity will generally require the least amount of maintenance. It allows moisture to pass into the cortex as needed, but resists permitting too much water to penetrate. Repeated works by various research groups have found that healthy hair of average porosity can absorb water up to a maximum of 31.1% by weight. Normal porosity hair has a tendency to hold styles well. Perming or coloring can be done in a predictable manner, following the usual guidelines of the product. However, one must note that these processes will damage the hair and increase its porosity over time. An occasional deep conditioning treatment with a protein-containing product will be of benefit, but proteins should not be included in the daily regimen.

Opened highly porous cuticle

High Porosity: High porosity is an unfortunate result of damage to the hair. Chemical processes, harsh treatment, and environmental exposure are all responsible for causing cumulative, irreversible damage to the cuticle layer. This damage creates gaps and holes in the surface of the hair shaft—essentially chinks in its armor. Hair with this type of uneven, pitted and rough surface is prone to damage from more and more sources, resulting in a cascade of effects that culminate in unmanageable and unlovely locks.

Hair with a great deal of porosity has been found to be capable of absorbing significantly higher amounts of water than hair or normal or low porosity (up to 55%, in contrast with 31.1% for healthy hair). Excessive absorption of water from the atmosphere causes frizz and tangling on humid days. Total immersion of high porosity hair during bathing, swimming, or shampooing can lead to significant breakage due to loss of elasticity from the sheer weight of the water absorbed. It also takes on color much more quickly and in higher concentrations than normal porosity hair when undergoing a chemical color process.

People with high porosity hair should use products with lots of moisturizers and emollients and also use anti-humectants in high heat and humidity climates in order to seal their cuticle against excessive absorption of moisture from the air. Protein treatments can also be very helpful for patching some of the holes in the hair, but one must follow up with moisturizing products in order to avoid a stiff texture. Rinsing with a slightly acidic rinse will help flatten and seal the cuticle. Some clear color applications have proteins in them than can patch the gaps in your hair also. Consult your professional hair stylist for more information about such products.




Edited by Lilnicka4u2nv - Nov 05 2011 at 8:45pm
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Lilnicka4u2nv View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 29 2007
Location: New Yawk
Status: Offline
Points: 148821
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lilnicka4u2nv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 12:16am

Wiry – has a sparkly sheen with low shine and low frizz. Water bounces or beads up on the hair strand.  Hair never seems to get fully wet.

They seem to get easier "hang"...

  I've read people say wiry hair straightens itself out as it dries...Like if you were to pull it  back into a ponytail it may stay straight...sounds familiar Natalee? LOL

Naturals with Coarse and Wirey hair...


clean hair

"i look lost in this picture, lol. this is my "soaking" wet hair after stepping out of the shower; even while i'm in the shower, standing under the water, it looks about the same as this. water forms beads/droplets on my hair, and then just seems to sit there; the droplets will also run down my scalp and drip off of my hair, which makes my ends dry out kind of quickly. so, while my hair holds water, it's not really wet...more like damp, kind of. my roots stay damp for a while."





Close ups 







Wirey/thready hair







Edited by Lilnicka4u2nv - Nov 05 2011 at 8:56pm
Back to Top
Lilnicka4u2nv View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 29 2007
Location: New Yawk
Status: Offline
Points: 148821
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lilnicka4u2nv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 12:18am
Next up : THREADY HAIR



Back to Top
.hott.pink. View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Dec 19 2009
Location: ATL ho.
Status: Offline
Points: 29631
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote .hott.pink. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 7:44am
Um...but how can you tell if what you're looking at is sheen or shine?
Back to Top
Swift View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Apr 16 2009
Location: Virginia, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 13023
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Swift Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 8:01am
I love you, Nike!  You rock for doing this!!
Back to Top
Lilnicka4u2nv View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 29 2007
Location: New Yawk
Status: Offline
Points: 148821
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lilnicka4u2nv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 1:34pm
Originally posted by .hott.pink. .hott.pink. wrote:

Um...but how can you tell if what you're looking at is sheen or shine?

Sheen is a more dull reflection of light...


Edited by Lilnicka4u2nv - Nov 05 2011 at 1:34pm
Back to Top
Lolliren View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Mar 12 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 12822
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lolliren Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 1:38pm
Nike, since you're low porosity, what texture are you?


Edited by Lolliren - Nov 05 2011 at 1:38pm
Back to Top
UrEpiphany View Drop Down
New Member
New Member
Avatar

Joined: Nov 05 2011
Location: MyWorld, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 2
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote UrEpiphany Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 1:49pm
Thanks for the thorough information...now, what kind of porosity does my hair have??Confused
Back to Top
Lilnicka4u2nv View Drop Down
Elite Member
Elite Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 29 2007
Location: New Yawk
Status: Offline
Points: 148821
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lilnicka4u2nv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 1:55pm
Originally posted by Lolliren Lolliren wrote:

Nike, since you're low porosity, what texture are you?


I have a silkish/cottony texture I guess I say cottony because of how thick my hair is....


  You can be any porosity with any texture, but it is common for wiry and silky types to have lower porosity, they each have different reasons why...

   The cuticle of silky hair is flatter hence the reason why they have a higher reflection of light...The flatter cuticles enable hair to retain moisture better...But here's a draw back with silky types, it is more sensitive to over moisturizing and can look greasy and weighed down...

   With wiry textures...if you look in the pictures above you will notice that the water beads on top of the strand, and it take's a while for the hair to get wet, while silkish hair wets easily but takes forever to dry...





Edited by Lilnicka4u2nv - Nov 05 2011 at 2:16pm
Back to Top
bbthamd View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Jul 01 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 1221
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote bbthamd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 05 2011 at 1:56pm
If there is ever a Mt. Rushmore of Natural Hair you will definitely get my vote to be on it. This is too good.
Back to Top
Get Longer Healthier Faster Growing Hair
House of CB London
Get Healthier Stronger Longer Hair
The Elite Hair Care Sorority
Electric Cherry Hair
Hair Extensions Wefted Hair Wigs and More
Human Hair Wigs
Wefting Training
Dime Curves Enhancement Shake
Dependable Quality Hair
Switch Up your Look with a protective Style
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 21>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down