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Hair Bleaching and Pre-lightening

 
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modelbusiness82 View Drop Down
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    Posted: Apr 14 2013 at 6:33pm
So this was the ombre shade I was trying to achieve:



But at this point, I would happily settle for this:



But the big issue is that I have these weird ash blond/#27 chunks of color near the top line of demarkation where the bleach was applied towards the top of the wig. :( So I'm concerned that they'll take the color differently (if at all) than the rest of the hair.


Edited by modelbusiness82 - Apr 14 2013 at 6:34pm
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modelbusiness82 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote modelbusiness82 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 14 2013 at 5:02pm
Ok I have a question:

I recently purchased an italian yaki unit in 1B and used BW bleach powder with clairol 40 developer to try to create an ombre effect. Of course, as has happened before, the color lifted and looked awesome with a strawberry blonde at the bottom, but ended up looking patchy and ash blonde in the middle (or ugly actually). And I found this odd since I started applying the bleach to the ends and worked my way up. So, I thought I would use a box dye to darken the middle section and make the transitional color look more natural and less harsh which I did just a few minutes ago. Unfortunately the color didn't really take and it looks blotchy and crappy. The reddish brown dyed sections ended up looking like pippy longstocking orange in some sections and just not taking at all in othersDead.

I'm not going to attempt to dye for at least a week and another deep condition since at this point I've done 2 processes in 48 hours. But at this point, I just want to get a nice warm brown in the center and a honey blond at the tips. Any suggestions?

ETA:

Right now I'm thinking I should just use the L'Oreal Hi Color in the blondes or browns colors with a 20 or 30 developer next week. Confused This was supposed to be my vacay hair so I have a month to figure it out! But your help is much appreciated!!!!

Update:

Ok so I was reading that dawn dish soap can take out color. And since the color I dyed was HIDEOUS I wanted to get it out ASAP. So, I ended up using palmolive, and it pulled out ALL of the ugly reddish orange. I'm soooo relieved. So, now it's sitting in a bunch of deep conditioner which I'll rinse out in a bit.

Still need a suggestion on how to dye the middle section a pretty color and not something God awful!


Edited by modelbusiness82 - Apr 14 2013 at 6:27pm
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Originally posted by Yogibear1989 Yogibear1989 wrote:

Hi Redsox,

I have unprocessed, coiled, virgin black hair and I desperately want to dye/tone/bleach it white. I've never bleached my hair before so I plan to take your advice and use the 2oz of 7th stage, 4oz of 20 volume creme developer with 3 packets of activator for about 45 minutes.

My question is am I going to need to bleach my hair twice?
That will depend on your application and how your hair processes. A Level 10 pale yellow (like the inside of a banana peel) is the lighteset your should EVER bleach hair; from there a violet based toner will be needed to get white hair. Do a strand test first to see how long you will leave the lightener in and if you may need to lighten more than once. If so, I say use two packets the first time and one packet the second time.


If so, how long should I wait in between bleachings?
That all depends on the condition of your hair and scalp after the first bleaching. If the scalp feels dry or tender wait a few days to a week (or until the scalp heals) to lighten again. If the hair is fried wait 2 weeks to a month (or until the hair is in better condtion) to repeat. Patience is very important when it comes to bleaching.


Should I use 3 packets of activator both times or would that be too harsh?
Using three packets twice would be too harsh and could result hair with the texture of overcooked noodles which will have to be cut off. If two lightenng processes are needed, use two packets the first time and 1 packet the second time.


And how can I do this without destroying my hair (I'm trying to do this with as little damage as possible)?
White hair is high maintenance!!! It requires a lot of upkeep so be prepared to stick to a hardcore regimen. This means weekly reconstructing/condtioning, moisturizing, toning and then root touch-ups. Before doing any sort of color change, both hair and scalp need to be in good condition....no rough combing or brushing, scabs, breakouts wounds, breakage, split ends, protein/moisture overload.


I know that I'll have to do an intense protein treatment, then tone and condition, but my biggest worry is on how to bleach the hair light enough for the toner to take properly without breaking my hair off.
I apply virgin coconut oil to my hair and scalp the day before lightening to help give a bit of protection from dryness. There's toners that don't require developer; I find those are actually better for people that may have a tender scalp (like I do) after bleaching. There's also the violet shampoos and conditioners so a toner may not even be needed.



Sooo... The amount of packets, the length of time the bleach is left in and the number of times I bleach it.

Thanks for your time and really... any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Smile

You're welcome! Oh and Welcome to BHM!Cool












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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Yogibear1989 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 06 2013 at 9:47pm
Hi Redsox,

I have unprocessed, coiled, virgin black hair and I desperately want to dye/tone/bleach it white. I've never bleached my hair before so I plan to take your advice and use the 2oz of 7th stage, 4oz of 20 volume creme developer with 3 packets of activator for about 45 minutes.

My question is am I going to need to bleach my hair twice?

If so, how long should I wait in between bleachings?

Should I use 3 packets of activator both times or would that be too harsh?

And how can I do this without destroying my hair (I'm trying to do this with as little damage as possible)?

I know that I'll have to do an intense protein treatment, then tone and condition, but my biggest worry is on how to bleach the hair light enough for the toner to take properly without breaking my hair off.

Sooo... The amount of packets, the length of time the bleach is left in and the number of times I bleach it.

Thanks for your time and really... any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Smile













Edited by Yogibear1989 - Apr 06 2013 at 9:48pm
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RedSoxtober View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RedSoxtober Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 05 2013 at 4:18pm
http://killerstrands.blogspot.com/search/label/Bleach%20Hair
If you're looking for more information on bleaching, feel free to read this blog. There's a ton of professional information.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RedSoxtober Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 21 2013 at 4:47am
Originally posted by sista_libra sista_libra wrote:

I have tried on several occasions to dye my relaxed hair to jet black using a permanent black hair dye with a box kit. My hair right now is a number 2 in weaves and i hate it. For some reason my hair never gets as dark as I want it (Jet Black #1). I have even used the black-blue color by l'oreal and them (boxed permanent dye). Do u think that lighening my hair first then dying it black will help?
 
Lightening then dyeing relaxed hair isn't a good idea. Since your hair is relaxed and dyed, it's already double processed and bleaching on top of that will cause some severe damage/breakage. If your hair is already damaged from the relaxer, it could be why your hair won't hold the color. Try doing a hardcore protein treatment and then use a black semi permenant hair dye (aka a  rinse). Rinse don't require a developer which could work better in your case and you can use them after your next touch up. If you're seeking something more permenant, stay away from box dye kits and buy a tube of creme hair color along with a 10 volume creme developer at a good beauty supply store or SALLY's if possible.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sista_libra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 19 2013 at 11:10pm
I have tried on several occasions to dye my relaxed hair to jet black using a permanent black hair dye with a box kit. My hair right now is a number 2 in weaves and i hate it. For some reason my hair never gets as dark as I want it (Jet Black #1). I have even used the black-blue color by l'oreal and them (boxed permanent dye). Do u think that lighening my hair first then dying it black will help?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote RedSoxtober Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 02 2013 at 11:05am
bumping....spring's coming up soon and people will probably be goin lighter.
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THE BLEACHING/ PRE-LIGHTENING PROCESS (REPOST)
This is for anyone that doesn't feel like going through 15 pages to find the steps. This will be reposted again and possibly revised for product recommendations.
 
Originally posted by RedSoxtober RedSoxtober wrote:

Here's some basic tools you'll need for bleaching and pre-lightening
 
 
WARNING: I am not a professional but have a almost 20 years of personal experience with bleaching and hair coloring.
-tint bowl and tint brush
-gloves (like medical gloves or salon gloves)
- a towel and washcloth that you won't mind getting messy
- a t-shirt that you won't mind getting messy
- hair lightener (powder, creme, liquid or oil it's up to you really)
- developer (comes in creme, liquid and lotion...I prefer creme or lotion to make a nice smooth mixture. It also comes in various strengths 10vol/3%, 20 vol/6%, 30 vol/9%, 40/12%.( I use 10-20 for pre-ligtening depending on what level hair color I want ) Read the instructions on the lightening packet before using developers some require a specific type and volume.
- shampoo, deep conditioner and reconstructor
- shower hose (it makes easier to rinse out hair color)
- two mirrors or a friend to help with parting and color application
NOTE: Before you do anything, make sure your hair is in good condition and do a porosity test!! This is the most important thing to check to ensure good color acheivement! Take a few strands of hair from your comb or brush for these tests. Next, move on to the strand test.
 
Porosity Test: Take 1 strand of clean dry hair and place it in a clear cup of water. If it floats, it's resistant. If it bobs in the water then it's somewhat porus and you'll need a protein filler prior to coloring. If it sinks, don't do any coloring until you get your hair in better condition or trim off the damaged parts. 
Strand Test: Take about 20-30 strands of hair from your comb or brush and arrange then so that the roots and ends are all matched up. If not, then...well your test results won't be accurate. Tape the strands to something like a piece of plastic shopping bag then take a tiny amount (a teaspoon works fine) of your hair lightener or color and mix with developer ( use something like the plastic part of a q-tip and a plastic bottle cap) according to whatever ratio the instructions say. Apply, then start your timer. Allow to process for 10 minutes, wipe away the mixture and hold the stand up to light. If this is not your desired shade, apply a little more mixture and process another 5 minutes. Continue to repeat until the desired shade has been reached or up to 45 minutes. Once you've determined the process time, write it down next to your strand test.
NOTE: For anyone trying to go 5 or more level lighter than their natural color or going from dark hair color to light, you WILL need to pre-lighten first.
.....I'll be back to post the next step.....
PROCESSING: So once you've applied the lightener or lifting haircolor, now comes the part where you wait for the 'magic' to happen.....I hate this part LOL. Depending on your scalp sensitivity, how many levels up (see hair lightening chart) , volume and type of lightener/haircolor/developer being used, a few things will most likely happen:
1. Hair and scalp will feel very warm especially at the roots.
Don't panic, this is part body heat and the the oxygen in the developer ("peroxide" = "per oxide") working its magic. However, if you feel like someone set your head on fire, feel free to do a thorough rinse with lukewarm water and conditon.
2. Some parts of your hair will be lighter than others.
Wherever you applied the lightener/ color first had more time to process...this is why you should either work at a decent pace or have a friend help out to keep from overprocessing. Be patient the color will even out unless you're trying to lift out a previous haircolor...more on that later.
3. Strong odor.
Somtimes it can be a little much. It's best to work in a well ventilated room. If your bathroom has a fan, turn it on or open your window a lil....or try to work in a room gets decent air circulation.
4. Product runs onto forehead, neck, ears.
Hopefully you've read the first page of this thread. It has a list of things you'll need. Definately have an old damp washcloth handy to wipe away any spills on your skin. If your skin gets irritated, use a lil cold cream (like Noxema) to help soothe.
5. Product dries out.
Another reason for doing the strand test. Placing a plastic cap on your hair after application will help solve that problem....unless the intructions say not to use a plastic cap.
NOTE: do not pile your hair onto the top of your head, just smooth hair back into a low ponytail, hold in place then put on plastic cap..the "tail" will rest in the back.
1. Make sure your hair is not overprecessed. Hair in this condition doesn't hold color well causing color to bleed and fade within a few shampoos.
2. Go easy on hair products like gels, hairsprays oils etc. since these tend to soak up haircolor and cause them to bleed out once shampooed.
3. Don't use clarifying and or dandruff shampoos. These also make colors bleed out.
4. Apply color to dry hair and use heat and a cap. Dry hair will soak up more color and heat helps open the cuticle allowing more color to get in. You can use a heating cap or a shower cap and a towel or scarf wrapped over it. I prefer the shower cap and towel method since it saves energy plus, you are free to move about. Hooray for multitasking!Clap
5. Wash with lukewarm water, rinse, condtion, rinse with cool water. Only use shampoo on your scalp; this way when you rinse the shampoo will run down the length of your hair cleansing the length and ends.
6. Be very careful about the quality of hairdye you purchase. Some local BSS tend to carry hairdye for way too long and some will turn yucky colors after its shelf life has expired (Manic Panic being #1 for this happening...this is one of a few reasons why I don't like this brand.)
7.Make sure you hair is saturated with dye. If you don't have enough to cover your hair, the color won't be as vivid or it could come out colors you'd find in a large box of Crayola crayons....especially with blue, aqua, turquoise,violet and purple shades. These tend to turn hair shades of grey, blue-green, slate and various grey-green shades. As for reds, you'll get pink, fuschia, orange, peach. Yellows will be off, golds will look orangey. Greens may be yellowish, spring green or just brassy.
8. Eventually you'll have to refresh your color.




Edited by RedSoxtober - Jan 02 2013 at 1:17am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RedSoxtober Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 02 2013 at 1:06am
Originally posted by Halogen1 Halogen1 wrote:

Hello:

Great information here.  I have a couple of questions:

  • Do you put the lightener into dry dirty hair, hair full of conditioner, dry clean hair, wet dirty hair, etc.?
  • Could you maybe do a post where you put all your advice (where you list the steps) into one message?  I think that the info. that I need is on page1 and page8, but I'm not sure if I had missed something. 

Also, I found this free google book on African American/Black hair and coloring, but most of the info. that is useful I found on Black Hair Media:

http://books.google.com/books?id=Iy1MP8y9lasC&pg=PA131&lpg=PA131&dq=does+hair+developer+work+faster+on+african+american+hair?&source=bl&ots=r8ONbKXpun&sig=tpaVJMpiSpWSDawAgPHplYdhyl0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=9jDaUJLpBIqLiAKT5oFA&ved=0CIUBEOgBMAc#v=onepage&q=does%20hair%20developer%20work%20faster%20on%20african%20american%20hair%3F&f=false

And here is a video of a hair stylist applying lightener and color in a series of steps:

http://www.monkeysee.com/play/2942-applying-lightner-to-hair

 
Q: Do you put the lightener into dry dirty hair, hair full of conditioner, dry clean hair, wet dirty hair, etc.?
 
A: It's best to lighten at least 3 days after washing your hair so that your sebum (scalp oils) will protect your scalp for the process. It's applied to dry hair but you can apply a little oil (olive oil, coconut oil, castor oil etc) on your scalp and ends beforehand.
 
I'll round up the steps and post them again on this thread. For some reason it messes up when I try to write long posts.
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