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Jewelsnyc View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Jewelsnyc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 5:34pm
Originally posted by Jewelsnyc Jewelsnyc wrote:

Originally posted by sbrownie84 sbrownie84 wrote:

This is a post for all the first generation Americans, Canadians, Europeans... .. Anyone with parentage from outside of the 'developed countries'

Was there a period of time where you felt alone bc of the differing cultures or did you connect more with the culture from your parents countries?

My father was american & my mother was Jamaican. I was raised more Americanized. I lived in JA for a year or so when I was little and if my father didn't break fool, I would've probably lived my whole life there...Because of that incident, I guess I gravitated towards american customs because my Dad & I were very close...but when I went to my mom's side of the family...Shocked culture shock like a mug!! Nothing but Jamican food, which I wasn't used to eating & an extremely strict upbringing...


Would you date a man from that country? I have mixed feelings, not really sure. Although there are many great qualities Jamaican men have, there are far more stereotypical things that I've run across I'd prefer not to have in a relationship.

I'm saying this bc for the majority of my life I considered myself non American even though I was born and raised here until I spend a long period of time in my parents country. Now I'm like 'hellz no I'm American'.
When I was growing up, it wasn't cool to be Jamaican..now that I'm older and understand/appreciate the traditions & the culture that was given to me, I'm proud to be and consider myself Jamaican.
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mizzsandra00 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mizzsandra00 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 5:42pm
Originally posted by afrokock afrokock wrote:

Originally posted by Maple Syrup Maple Syrup wrote:

Originally posted by mizzsandra00 mizzsandra00 wrote:

So all you knew was American and you didn't consider yourself american?




That's pretty common for many children of immigrants, not only in America, but Canada, UK, any where in the world.
yeah.

I find, in my opinion of course, Africans and other people of black descent are proud to have kids who don't speak the mother tongue.

You find 1st gem offspring of the above with seemingly no knowledge or pride of their culture, but their Asian or Indian counterparts who may be 3 gens deep are so culturally aware with command of their native tongues like they just stepped off the boat

It amuses me.

I have a mexican friend with grandparents that refuse to teach her Spanish......her mother doesnt speak Spanish either......poor thing tried to learn it in school.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CherryBlossom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 5:43pm
Originally posted by afrokock afrokock wrote:

Originally posted by Maple Syrup Maple Syrup wrote:

Originally posted by mizzsandra00 mizzsandra00 wrote:

So all you knew was American and you didn't consider yourself american?




That's pretty common for many children of immigrants, not only in America, but Canada, UK, any where in the world.
yeah.

I find, in my opinion of course, Africans and other people of black descent are proud to have kids who don't speak the mother tongue.

You find 1st gem offspring of the above with seemingly no knowledge or pride of their culture, but their Asian or Indian counterparts who may be 3 gens deep are so culturally aware with command of their native tongues like they just stepped off the boat

It amuses me.

yeah I've found that to be true as well...it's a really disgusting and sad mentality imo--raising these bastardised children who have no knowledge of their own language or culture. I guess that's why people looked at my folks like they were weirdos for trying to teach us everything.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Sang Froid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 5:50pm
When we talk about American culture we're talking about black American right?
Cause I can't relate to whitey...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mizzsandra00 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 5:52pm
I wish my grandmother would have taught us french......I get a lil jelly when other people can have side convos in another language.......
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote JoliePoufiasse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 7:52pm
Interesting question. Tbh, to this day, I don't spontaneously refer to myself as Canadian (except on BHM, lol!) when I'm asked for my nationality, unless I'm trying to piss off white folks who ask me the same old annoying "where are you from" question. And this, even though I was born and raised here and never spent any significant amount of time in either Haiti or Guadeloupe (except for a few holidays). I tend to say I'm Haitian/Guadeloupian with a stronger emphasis on Haitian.
 
I guess it comes from growing up not being de facto accepted as a Canadian by white folks in Quebec. On the other hand, I can't say that I felt torn. It's hard to explain. I always knew that my mentality/my outlook on things was strongly Canadian, all the while retaining elements of my parents' cultures. And frankly, for a long time I never even wanted to date a Haitian at all (not many Guadeloupians here anyway, so it's not much of an issue). I knew I had little to no interest in white dudes, though. My first boyfriend was African and I only had two Haitian boyfriends throughout my life, one of which was a brief fling. I did date 2 white guys, but again very briefly. I wouldn't call those relationships. Ironically, now I'm totally open and eager to dating Haitian and other west-indian men (as long as they are born here or in the West, lol!) I guess my marriage took care of that, lol.
 
I had a stronger sense of black pride (from taking an interest in Haitian history and subsequently all of black history worldwide in my teens) than I did west-indian pride, if it makes any sense.
 
Great question, though.


Edited by JoliePoufiasse - Jul 04 2013 at 7:55pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote JoliePoufiasse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 8:02pm
Originally posted by mizzsandra00 mizzsandra00 wrote:

I wish my grandmother would have taught us french......I get a lil jelly when other people can have side convos in another language.......
 
Well, if you're Haitian and were raised in the U.S., that sort of makes sense. None of my cousins who are born and raised in the U.S. speak any French at all. They communicated with family in creole (and even that is somewhat rusty! It's more that they understand creole perfectly). Ironically one of my cousins married a white dude with French roots and now she regrets it!
 
My situation is different because I was raised in French Canada and went through the French school system up until university. So it made sense that my parents would speak to me both in creole and in French growing up, plus French was my first language in school and society. I learned English as a teenager, through watching soap operas mostly (lol) and through listening to music and reading novels.


Edited by JoliePoufiasse - Jul 04 2013 at 8:04pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rickysrose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 10:39pm
sbrownie are you talking about or influenced by not being accepted as "local" or genuine in your parents' home country?

I am Jamaican, always will be but I realize that living in Jamaica, I wouldn't necessarily be seen that way but that doesn't affect my affinity

people stereotype, you can use it to your advantage sometimes, sometimes you just have to shrug but I wouldn't let that take away from who you are


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote rickysrose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 04 2013 at 10:44pm

I was born, raised and lived in North America most of my life

but when I step foot in the Caribbean it feels like home in such a primal way


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote newdiva1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 05 2013 at 3:38am
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by mizzsandra00 mizzsandra00 wrote:

I wish my grandmother would have taught us french......I get a lil jelly when other people can have side convos in another language.......
 
Well, if you're Haitian and were raised in the U.S., that sort of makes sense. None of my cousins who are born and raised in the U.S. speak any French at all. They communicated with family in creole (and even that is somewhat rusty! It's more that they understand creole perfectly). Ironically one of my cousins married a white dude with French roots and now she regrets it!
 
My situation is different because I was raised in French Canada and went through the French school system up until university. So it made sense that my parents would speak to me both in creole and in French growing up, plus French was my first language in school and society. I learned English as a teenager, through watching soap operas mostly (lol) and through listening to music and reading novels.

 

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