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Tignon Laws of 1786

 
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liesnalibis View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote liesnalibis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Tignon Laws of 1786
    Posted: Jan 09 2016 at 1:51pm
Anyone ever heard of this? I believe I read about this before in an Anne Rice book.




Tignon Law

This headdress was the result of sumptuary laws passed in 1786 under the administration of Governor Esteban Rodriguez Miró. Called the tignon laws, they prescribed and enforced appropriate public dress for female gens de couleur in colonial society. At this time in Louisiana history, women of African descent vied with white women in beauty, dress and manners. Many of them had become the placées (openly kept mistresses) of white, French, and Spanish Creole men. This incurred the jealousy and anger of their wives, mothers, sisters, daughters and fiancées. One complaint was that white men pursuing flirtations or liaisons sometimes mistook upper-class white women for light-skinned women of African descent and accosted them in an improper manner.

To prevent this, Governor Miró decreed that women of African descent, slave or free, should cover their hair and heads with a knotted headdress and refrain from "excessive attention to dress" to maintain class distinctions.

Historian Virginia M. Gould notes that Miró hoped the law would control women “who had become too light skinned or who dressed too elegantly, or who, in reality, competed too freely with white women for status and thus threatened the social order.”[1]


Afro-Créole protest

Miró's intent of having the tignon mark inferiority had a somewhat different effect, according to historian Carolyn Long[2] who noted: "Instead of being considered a badge of dishonor, the tignon…became a fashion statement. The bright reds, blues, and yellows of the scarves, and the imaginative wrapping techniques employed by their wearers, are said to have enhanced the beauty of the women of color."

The women who were targets of this decree were inventive and imaginative. They decorated tignons with their jewels and ribbons, and used the finest available materials to wrap their hair. In other words, "[t]hey effectively re-interpreted the law without technically breaking the law"[3]—and they continued to be pursued by men.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DiorShowGirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 09 2016 at 6:58pm
The women who were targets of this decree were inventive and imaginative. They decorated tignons with their jewels and ribbons, and used the finest available materials to wrap their hair. In other words, "[t]hey effectively re-interpreted the law without technically breaking the law"[3]—and they continued to be pursued by men.



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uh- huh now..outwhitted the person who implemented this headdress idea...still had mad game with the men..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote eanaj5 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 09 2016 at 7:21pm
Originally posted by liesnalibis liesnalibis wrote:

Anyone ever heard of this? I believe I read about this before in an Anne Rice book.




Afro-Créole protest

Miró's intent of having the tignon mark inferiority had a somewhat different effect, according to historian Carolyn Long[2] who noted: "Instead of being considered a badge of dishonor, the tignon…became a fashion statement. The bright reds, blues, and yellows of the scarves, and the imaginative wrapping techniques employed by their wearers, are said to have enhanced the beauty of the women of color."

The women who were targets of this decree were inventive and imaginative. They decorated tignons with their jewels and ribbons, and used the finest available materials to wrap their hair. In other words, "[t]hey effectively re-interpreted the law without technically breaking the law"[3]and they continued to be pursued by men.



BIIIIIAAAAAAAAAAAAAATTTTCHHHHHHH Cool


Edited by eanaj5 - Jan 09 2016 at 7:22pm
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liesnalibis View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote liesnalibis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 09 2016 at 7:31pm
I read another reason (probably the main reason) was that the mixed/black women were looking too nice and were making the white women look plain. Keep in hand these people weren't exactly poor. Many of them were educated or had trades because their white fathers paid for their son's educations. They could afford to look nice.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote liesnalibis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 09 2016 at 7:35pm
It's really pathetic because some of these women looked exactly like white women. They could have been 1/8 or less. But laws were put in place to prevent them from possibly being mistaken for and treated like a "lady" out in society. They didn't want them feelin themselves too much. That one drop rule.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eanaj5 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 09 2016 at 7:37pm
Originally posted by liesnalibis liesnalibis wrote:

I read another reason (probably the main reason) was that the mixed/black women were looking too nice and were making the white women look plain. Keep in hand these people weren't exactly poor. Many of them were educated or had trades because their white fathers paid for their son's educations. They could afford to look nice.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nitabug Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 09 2016 at 8:55pm
it was posted before. Maybe the black history thread?. I fidget
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nicks_hotmama06 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 10 2016 at 12:56am
Yup. Read about this while looking up something else......that happens to me a lot lol.
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