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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote blaquefoxx Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 21 2014 at 8:20pm


Millie and Christine McCoy (1851-1912) were conjoined twins born into slavery. They and their mother were sold to a showman, Joseph Smith. Smith and his wife educated the girls; they eventually could speak five languages, dance, play music, and sing. They were known as 'The TwoHeaded Nightingale'. In the 1880s they retired and purchased a small farm. Millie died of tuberculosis at age 61, with Christine following hours later. They remain one of the oldest-lived set of conjoined twins."


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote blaquefoxx Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 23 2014 at 11:06pm

Whites Used Black Babies as Alligator Bait

Posted by Reunionblackfamily. on January 23, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Africa America

Black Babies used for ALLIGATOR BAIT in florida

Two movies in 1900 “Alligator Bait” and “Gator and the Pickaninny.” both showed and proved this practice.There were many advertisements and postcards in the South that proved this was real.

A

In 1923 Time magazine carried this story:

 

From Chipley, Fla., it was reported that colored babies were being used for alligator bait. The infants are allowed to play in shallow water while expert riflemen watch from concealment nearby. When a saurian approaches his prey, he is shot by the rifleme


Alligator bait, also known as gator bait, is the practice of using little black children as bait to catch alligators.

Here is the most complete account of how it was done, coming from the grandson of someone who says he used to do it:

 

… the slaves who had babies they would steal the babies during the course of the day, some times when their mothers weren’t watching . … some would be infants, some would be a year old, he said some would be toddlers, he said they would grab these children and take them down to the swamp, and leave them in pens like little chicken coops.

 

They would go down there at night, take these babies and …. tie them up, put a rope around their neck and around their torso, around here, and tie it tight.

 

… they’d be screaming. … what they were doing would help them to chum the water. He said when they would throw the babies in tied to this rope, he said in a matter of minutes, he said, the alligator were on them. He said the alligator would clamp his jaws on that child, as a matter of fact once he clamped on them he was really swallowed, he said you couldn’t see anything but the rope!


As a lifelong student, and later lecturer of African and African American history, I thought I had covered just about all of the bases when it came to atrocities committed against black people by Europeans and their American cousins.

I've done the research, written the papers, attended the classes and seminars...and I travel every year to the Motherland.

I have thoroughly explored the Atlantic Slave Trade, beginning with the kidnapping of Africans from the interior of Africa. I have been force-marched along with my forebearers through the thick jungle and bush, across mile-wide rivers, and burning deserts to the coast, sometimes for hundreds of miles.

I have actually visited many of the “slave castles” – dungeons – which dot Africa's West Coast and where the captured men, women and children were warehoused like so much cattle or cord wood (chattel) until an English, French, Dutch, Spanish or American slave ship appeared on the horizon to transport them to a new life of endless unpaid, forced labor in the so-called “New World.”

And, of course, as stated, I've done the reading, watched the movies and documentaries, about the absolutely indescribable horror of the damnable voyage across the Atlantic that has come down to us as “The Middle Passage.” Indeed, on every single flight I've made back and forth across that vast and angry ocean, I look down from 35,000 feet at its turbulent waters. I try, but of course can never really imagine, appreciate or understand what it must have been like for those many millions who were hog-tied naked, chained and shackled in those filthy ships' holds.

And then there is the actual on-the-ground, in-the-field, in-the-mine, and in-the-house enslavement of the people. Again, I've read the books.

But I also talked extensively with my own now deceased parents and grandparents (on both sides) about their “treatment” from the 1920s right straight through to the 1960s in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Missouri and Arkansas. They were never slaves per se, but they might as well have been. My father's parents – and him – were share croppers and tenant farmers until they escaped Louisiana during World War II.

What you will read below and watch is breathtaking in its depravity.

I called my mother's last surviving sister tonight and asked her did she know anything about this. She is 83. And, if she did, why we were never told of this as kids growing up. She hesitated for a full minute. Finally, they did not tell us about "a lot of things that white folks did to us" "down South," she said. They were afraid that it would forever embitter me, my siblings and cousins against white people forever. Once they had all successfully "escaped" the South, they wanted to put those years behind them, and build new lives here "up North," she concluded.

And so it is that I am thankful that the Internet has provided an opportunity for black people to regain their stolen history – not just as victims of white America but as the descendants of powerful empires and nation-states which once put Europe to shame in terms of wealth, land, population, health, education, and most importantly, in terms of justice.

Did you know that black babies were often used as bait for alligators in the swamps from Texas to Florida. I didn't until today. It just never occurred to me that any people would do – could do – such a thing to another people.

But it happened – for hundreds of years, well into the 20th century.

The practice has been documented in at least three movies: “Alligator Bait” (1900) and “The ‘Gator and the Pickaninny” (1900). And the story of two black boys who served as alligator bait was told in “Untamed Fury” (1947).

Indeed, the term “alligator bait” was common throughout the South from at least the 1860s to and through the 1960s. It was a racial slur and threat among whites that was meant to “domesticate” recalcitrant black children. But by the 1940s in Harlem, New York, “alligator bait” applied to blacks of any age – particularly those who were from Florida.

Finally, in terms of iconography, from at least the 1890s to the 1960s, black children were often pictured as alligator bait – as toys for white children, soap dishes, toothbrushes, ash trays, and especially on postcards sent through the US mail.

Again, the attached video is disturbing. I strongly advise anyone with a weak stomach not to view it.

Reparations anyone? Naw ... didn't think so.

White folks don't owe black folks anything, right?

Just like they don't owe the Indians a damn thing, either – except maybe a few casinos.

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Time to drop some stuff for Black History Month
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Google honors Harriet Tubman *HEART* with Google doodle.

Celebrating Harriet Tubman

To celebrate the first day of Black History Month, Google is honoring Harriet Tubman, known for her work with the Underground Railroad. 

Tubman was born a slave in Maryland but escaped to freedom and later led more than 300 other slaves to the north and to Canada during the American Civil War.

Tubman accomplished this by using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. 

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gohoneycocolove:

What Really Happened in the Congo: Belgium’s ‘Heart of Darkness’

Leopold famously said when he was forced to hand over the Congo Free State to the Belgian nation: “I will give them my Congo but they have no right to know what I have done there,” and proceeded to burn archives.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/belgium-confronts-its-heart-of-darkness-6151923.html

Did y’all know about this?

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Perhaps there has been no greater cultural export from African-American culture than its music. If, as Chuck D once announced, rap is black America’s CNN, then music overall has served as a rallying cry against injustice and fueled black America’s soundtrack for change. In honor of Black Music History Month, here are 25 songs that speak to music’s ability to evoke thought, dialogue and action. 

“To Be Young, Gifted and Black” - Nina Simone

Although versions by Donny Hathaway and Aretha Franklin are more well-known, Nina Simone originated this song, which became popular during the ongoing civil rights struggle, in 1970 as a tribute to her friend Lorraine Hansberry.


“We Shall Overcome”

Derived from the refrain of the gospel song “I’ll Overcome Someday” (1900) from Rev. Dr. Charles Albert Tindley, the song “We Shall Overcome,” which was adapted at the Highlander Folk School in 1946, an important training ground for many civil rights leaders, is a key Civil Rights Movement anthem that was sung during many key protests.

“Fight the Power” - Public Enemy

Released on the Do the Right Thing soundtrack in 1989, this song was a wake-up call to many in the hip-hop generation to rally against abuse of power. Taking sampling to new heights, “Fight the Power” serves as an aural tapestry of African-American culture as well as a tribute to the African-American tradition of freedom fighting and rallying cry.

“Self-Destruction” - The Stop the Violence Movement

Spearheaded by KRS-One in response to escalating gun violence in the black community, which included the death of his friend Scott La Rock, this 1989 powerhouse recording brought together hip-hop superstars such as Public Enemy and MC Lyte to raise awareness and spur action to end the self-destructive behavior.

“Wake Up Everybody” - Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes

This 1975 hit, featuring Teddy Pendergrass on lead vocals, is full of socially conscious lyrics that, as evidenced by John Legend’s acclaimed 2010 cover, continue to resonate today. In addition, the song is easily among the best offerings from legendary producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff

“Go Down Moses”
Often sung in tribute to Harriet Tubman, who was called the “Moses of her people,” this enduring Negro spiritual, recorded by the Fisk Jubilee Singers and frequently performed by Paul Robeson, is known as an Underground Railroad anthem.

Say It Loud I’m Black and I’m Proud” - James Brown

Released months after Dr. King’s assassination, this song is one of James Brown’s crowning achievements and is credited as the anthem for “black pride”. Released at a time when Negro was still the predominant term, this song helped a nation embrace the term “black” as well as natural hairstyles and Afrocentric clothing.

“F**k Tha Police” - NWA

Although interpreted by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies as an anti-police song, this 1988 NWA classic continues to speak to the police brutality many people of color regularly experience. Subsequent incidents such as the Rodney King beating and racial profiling continue to attest to the truth illustrated in the song.

“The Battle Hymn of the Republic” by Julia Ward Howe

Incorporating music from “John Brown’s Body,” a popular song about the well-known abolitionist, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” published by the “Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments,” was a popular marching song for the U.S. Colored Troops. Dr. King even recited a line from the song during the last sermon before his assassination

“Keep on Pushing” - The Impressions

The title song of a 1964 album, this track, written by Curtis Mayfield (pictured), who also sang lead, was the first of many that was embraced by Dr. King and many others who worked tirelessly for justice and equality. Follow-ups include “People Get Ready” and “Move on Up”.

“We Are the World” - USA for Africa

Arguably the greatest celebrity charity song ever done, more than 40 stars Written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie and produced by Quincy Jones and Michael Omartian, 1985 classic is arguably the greatest celebrity, charity song ever done. More than 40 stars, including Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Tina Turner, Harry Belafonte and Diana Ross, recorded the song which helped


“Lift Every Voice and Sing” - James Weldon Johnson and John Rosamond Johnson

Originally written as a poem by civil rights activist James Weldon Johnson to honor a school visit by Booker T. Washington (pictured), “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” set to music with the assistance of his brother John Rosamond Johnson in 1905, quickly became the “Negro National Anthem.” The song’s enduring legacy is its hope for the future

“The Star-Spangled Banner”

When African-Americans like Marvin Gaye and Whitney Houston have performed the national anthem well, it’s generated pride in all Americans. Equally important, bold action like that of 1968 Olympic medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who raised black gloved fists in protest as it played, has brought much needed attention to injustice and inequality

Get Up, Stand Up” - Bob Marley & The Wailers

Written by Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, “Get Up, Stand Up,” released in 1973, was among The Wailers’ first international hits. A song of political importance encouraging ordinary citizens to “get up, stand up, stand up for your rights,” Marley frequently ended his concerts with this song, which is reportedly the last song he performed live on stage before his death in 1981

Happy Birthday” - Stevie Wonder

Sometimes simplicity can compel a cause and this 1981 Stevie Wonder hit, advocating for a national holiday commemorating Dr. King’s Birthday, is a testament to that. In addition to rallying African-Americans around a King Holiday, this version of “Happy Birthday” has supplanted all others for most African-Americans.

“Man in the Mirror” - Michael Jackson

One of Michael Jackson’s most introspective songs, this 1988 classic, co-written by Siedah Garrett, didn’t just speak of social ills but challenged the singer and those listening to “take a look in the mirror and then make a change.”
“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” - Gil Scott-Heron

Perhaps the most well-known composition from Gil Scott-Heron, who passed on May 27, this spoken word classic, set largely to bongo drums and congas when it was first recorded in 1970, has captivated and influenced conscious hip-hop artists like Public Enemy’s Chuck D as well as become a popular expression attesting that African-Americans will not find freedom in American mass culture, among other realities.

“What’s Going On” - Marvin Gaye

Considered one of Marvin Gaye’s greatest songs ever, “What’s Going On,” released in 1971, was a huge departure from Motown’s decidedly apolitical stance. Leaked over the objections of Berry Gordy, who found the song risky, Gaye created an anthem that addressed the Vietnam War as well as police brutality and other social ills at home


“Dear Mama” - Tupac Shakur

Before Tupac released this song in 1995, hip-hop had no bone fide mother tribute songs. Paying homage to his mother Afeni Shakur, a Black Panther and activist who raised him and his sister as a single mother amid her own struggles with crack cocaine, “Dear Mama” also exposes the pressures of young black men growing up in harsh, urban environments

“Let’s Talk About Sex” - Salt-N-Pepa

Released in 1991, this song, which dealt with sex head on, was a bold statement from Salt-N-Pepa, especially since the controversial video introduced talk of AIDS and HIV to many in the hip-hop generation. It was so effective that “Let’s Talk About AIDS” also followed.


“A Change is Gonna Come” - Sam Cooke

Written and recorded in 1963 and released in 1964, this Civil Rights anthem has proved to be a timeless classic against racism and injustice that long outlived its creator. Inspired by the times as well as musicians who used their art to promote positive social change, this song is considered Cooke’s most enduring legacy. 

“The Message” - Grandmaster & the Furious Five

Before “The Message,” released in 1982, hip-hop songs were largely party or bra docio songs. This song not only exposed the conditions and pressures of life in the “ghetto” but also included sociopolitical commentary on such topics as unemployment, homelessness and drug use.

“Tennessee” - Arrested Development

With its Southern-centered lyrics and evocation of Jim Crow and slavery, “Tennessee,” a 1992 hit on both the R&B and rap charts, is considered the first socially conscious Southern rap song that also infused spirituality as well as embodied the popular axiom “to know your past is to know your future

“Ain’t No Stoppin’ Us Now” - McFadden and Whitehead

Released in 1979, this disco classic was intended as a tribute to African American progress. It enjoyed a popular resurgence during Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign when it was played the night he accepted the Democratic Party’s nomination for president

This is a dope list. If you’ve never heard any of these please refer to youtube and be enlightened.

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Less than a day after Michael Jackson’s death, the mayor of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, announced that the city would erect a statue of the singer in Dona Marta, a favela that was once notorious for drug dealing and is now a model for social development. The change was spurred partly by Jackson’s 1996 visit to film the video for “They Don’t Care About Us.”

When Jackson came to Brazil to shoot the video, directed by Spike Lee, Rio’s local government became concerned that the singer would show the world an unflattering picture of poverty. At the time, Brazilians, like people the world over, saw Jackson as an idol. He’d been to the country twice before, once with the Jackson 5 in the ’70s and again in 1993, when he played two concerts in São Paulo to 100,000 people each night.

At the time, the concert promoter Dodi Sirena recalls a “sensitive” artist who asked for an amusement park to be reserved for his use, then invited children from the poorest public schools. “He displayed great concern for everything in the country, with poverty, with street children,” Sirena says.

In that context, Jackson’s choice of locale for his video made sense. “The video is about the people no one cares about,” says Claudia Silva, press liaison for Rio’s office of tourism.

When Jackson shot the video in Rio, Silva was a journalist for the daily newspaper O Globo, but Lee and his staff had banned journalists from the shoot because Dona Marta drug dealers didn’t want the attention. But Silva found a family that let her spend the night at their home and saw the favela residents washing the streets to prepare for Jackson’s arrival. “The people were so proud,” Silva says. “That was the best thing for me. People got up early to clean the area, they prepared for him, they took out the trash.”

Jackson arrived by helicopter but walked the streets of Dona Marta shaking hands and distributing candy. “People were very surprised in the end, because they were expecting an extraterrestrial guy,” Silva says. “And he was—it sounds strange to say this—a normal guy.”

Jackson shot scenes in Salvador, alongside throngs of people, accompanied by the Afro-Brazilian cultural group Olodum. In the video, he can be seen dancing to the beat of hundreds of Olodum’s drummers and with cheering fans who reach out to touch him—and at one point burst through security and push him to the floor.

"This process to make Dona Marta better started with Michael Jackson," Silva says. "Now it’s a safe favela. There are no drug dealers anymore, and there’s a massive social project. But all the attention started with Michael Jackson." —Leila Cobo


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Alias_Avi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 03 2014 at 2:06am
Damn.

You can now trace the legacy of British (individual and corporate) involvement with slavery using this database

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/

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