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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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tatee View Drop Down
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The Google Logo for 1/7/2014

Did y'all see it? It's Zora Neale Hurston Shocked

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Kalamu ya Salaam's information blog

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we're celebrating him today. My sibs were in his classes and said he used to talk about all  the great writers that were his friends.  I arrived a little too late to have the honor of sitting in one of his lecture halls.


Dr. Blyden Jackson
The first tenured Black Professor at The University of NC at Chapel Hill. 


Blyden (1910-2000) and Roberta Jackson (1920-1999) and Jackson Hall

UNC Chapel Hill Facilities Services
News and Observer

Blyden and Roberta Jackson Hall houses the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. This is the former Monogram Building and Navy Hall; it dates from 1942 when the U.S. Navy constructed it for students in its pre-flight training program. The university renamed it in 1992. Blyden Jackson, who joined the English department in 1969, became the university’s first tenured black professor; his wife, Roberta Jackson, joined the faculty in 1974 as an associate professor in the School of Education and became the first tenured black woman in the Division of Academic Affairs. The Jacksons retired from teaching in 1981.














Blyden Jackson grew up in Louisville, Kentucky, during the 1910s and 1920s. Jackson completed his bachelor's degree at Wilberforce University and attended one year of graduate school at Columbia University before returning to Louisville, where he worked as a teacher for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) from the early 1930s into the mid-1940s. In 1945, Jackson moved to Nashville, Tennessee, to accept a position teaching English at Fisk University. Having received a Rosenwald Fellowship with the aid of Charles S. Johnson, president of Fisk University, Jackson completed his doctoral degree at the University of Michigan in 1952. Two years later, Jackson left Fisk University to teach at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where he remained for fifteen years.

In 1969, he accepted a position at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As the first African American professor at UNC, Jackson also became the first African American professor at a traditionally white university in the Southeast. Jackson finished his academic career at UNC, also serving as the associate dean of the graduate school before retiring in 1983. In addition to tracing the trajectory of his academic career, Jackson also offers his commentary on his experiences as an African American graduate student at the predominantly white University of Michigan, his interactions with Langston Hughes from the 1930s through subsequent decades, and his thoughts on the lingering challenges of recruiting African American professors and graduate students.


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Millie and Christine McCoy (1851-1912) were conjoined twins born into slavery. They and their mother were sold to a showman, Joseph Smith. Smith and his wife educated the girls; they eventually could speak five languages, dance, play music, and sing. They were known as 'The TwoHeaded Nightingale'. In the 1880s they retired and purchased a small farm. Millie died of tuberculosis at age 61, with Christine following hours later. They remain one of the oldest-lived set of conjoined twins."


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Whites Used Black Babies as Alligator Bait

Posted by Reunionblackfamily. on January 23, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Africa America

Black Babies used for ALLIGATOR BAIT in florida

Two movies in 1900 “Alligator Bait” and “Gator and the Pickaninny.” both showed and proved this practice.There were many advertisements and postcards in the South that proved this was real.

A

In 1923 Time magazine carried this story:

 

From Chipley, Fla., it was reported that colored babies were being used for alligator bait. The infants are allowed to play in shallow water while expert riflemen watch from concealment nearby. When a saurian approaches his prey, he is shot by the rifleme


Alligator bait, also known as gator bait, is the practice of using little black children as bait to catch alligators.

Here is the most complete account of how it was done, coming from the grandson of someone who says he used to do it:

 

… the slaves who had babies they would steal the babies during the course of the day, some times when their mothers weren’t watching . … some would be infants, some would be a year old, he said some would be toddlers, he said they would grab these children and take them down to the swamp, and leave them in pens like little chicken coops.

 

They would go down there at night, take these babies and …. tie them up, put a rope around their neck and around their torso, around here, and tie it tight.

 

… they’d be screaming. … what they were doing would help them to chum the water. He said when they would throw the babies in tied to this rope, he said in a matter of minutes, he said, the alligator were on them. He said the alligator would clamp his jaws on that child, as a matter of fact once he clamped on them he was really swallowed, he said you couldn’t see anything but the rope!


As a lifelong student, and later lecturer of African and African American history, I thought I had covered just about all of the bases when it came to atrocities committed against black people by Europeans and their American cousins.

I've done the research, written the papers, attended the classes and seminars...and I travel every year to the Motherland.

I have thoroughly explored the Atlantic Slave Trade, beginning with the kidnapping of Africans from the interior of Africa. I have been force-marched along with my forebearers through the thick jungle and bush, across mile-wide rivers, and burning deserts to the coast, sometimes for hundreds of miles.

I have actually visited many of the “slave castles” – dungeons – which dot Africa's West Coast and where the captured men, women and children were warehoused like so much cattle or cord wood (chattel) until an English, French, Dutch, Spanish or American slave ship appeared on the horizon to transport them to a new life of endless unpaid, forced labor in the so-called “New World.”

And, of course, as stated, I've done the reading, watched the movies and documentaries, about the absolutely indescribable horror of the damnable voyage across the Atlantic that has come down to us as “The Middle Passage.” Indeed, on every single flight I've made back and forth across that vast and angry ocean, I look down from 35,000 feet at its turbulent waters. I try, but of course can never really imagine, appreciate or understand what it must have been like for those many millions who were hog-tied naked, chained and shackled in those filthy ships' holds.

And then there is the actual on-the-ground, in-the-field, in-the-mine, and in-the-house enslavement of the people. Again, I've read the books.

But I also talked extensively with my own now deceased parents and grandparents (on both sides) about their “treatment” from the 1920s right straight through to the 1960s in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Missouri and Arkansas. They were never slaves per se, but they might as well have been. My father's parents – and him – were share croppers and tenant farmers until they escaped Louisiana during World War II.

What you will read below and watch is breathtaking in its depravity.

I called my mother's last surviving sister tonight and asked her did she know anything about this. She is 83. And, if she did, why we were never told of this as kids growing up. She hesitated for a full minute. Finally, they did not tell us about "a lot of things that white folks did to us" "down South," she said. They were afraid that it would forever embitter me, my siblings and cousins against white people forever. Once they had all successfully "escaped" the South, they wanted to put those years behind them, and build new lives here "up North," she concluded.

And so it is that I am thankful that the Internet has provided an opportunity for black people to regain their stolen history – not just as victims of white America but as the descendants of powerful empires and nation-states which once put Europe to shame in terms of wealth, land, population, health, education, and most importantly, in terms of justice.

Did you know that black babies were often used as bait for alligators in the swamps from Texas to Florida. I didn't until today. It just never occurred to me that any people would do – could do – such a thing to another people.

But it happened – for hundreds of years, well into the 20th century.

The practice has been documented in at least three movies: “Alligator Bait” (1900) and “The ‘Gator and the Pickaninny” (1900). And the story of two black boys who served as alligator bait was told in “Untamed Fury” (1947).

Indeed, the term “alligator bait” was common throughout the South from at least the 1860s to and through the 1960s. It was a racial slur and threat among whites that was meant to “domesticate” recalcitrant black children. But by the 1940s in Harlem, New York, “alligator bait” applied to blacks of any age – particularly those who were from Florida.

Finally, in terms of iconography, from at least the 1890s to the 1960s, black children were often pictured as alligator bait – as toys for white children, soap dishes, toothbrushes, ash trays, and especially on postcards sent through the US mail.

Again, the attached video is disturbing. I strongly advise anyone with a weak stomach not to view it.

Reparations anyone? Naw ... didn't think so.

White folks don't owe black folks anything, right?

Just like they don't owe the Indians a damn thing, either – except maybe a few casinos.

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Time to drop some stuff for Black History Month
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Google honors Harriet Tubman *HEART* with Google doodle.

Celebrating Harriet Tubman

To celebrate the first day of Black History Month, Google is honoring Harriet Tubman, known for her work with the Underground Railroad. 

Tubman was born a slave in Maryland but escaped to freedom and later led more than 300 other slaves to the north and to Canada during the American Civil War.

Tubman accomplished this by using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. 

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gohoneycocolove:

What Really Happened in the Congo: Belgium’s ‘Heart of Darkness’

Leopold famously said when he was forced to hand over the Congo Free State to the Belgian nation: “I will give them my Congo but they have no right to know what I have done there,” and proceeded to burn archives.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/belgium-confronts-its-heart-of-darkness-6151923.html

Did y’all know about this?

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