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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 11 2013 at 12:16am

Little Known Black History Fact: Bill Wilkerson


Pilot Bill Wilkerson of Pleasant Garden, North Carolina was among the first black pilots in the country. Wilkerson flew 15 years for Piedmont Airlines, which became a part of US Airways in 1989. In 1980, he became the second black person to earn the rank of captain with the company. The retired pilot still wears his captains’ uniform while he gives tours at the North Carolina Transportation Museum.

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“One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” That 1969 Neil Armstrong quote is certainly associated with space exploration, but even before that actress Nichelle Nichols was making all kinds of history in space — sort of. Portraying Lt. Uhura, the communications officer on the U.S.S. Enterprise on TV’s Star Trek from 1966 to 1969, Nichols was the first African American woman on TV not portraying a servant.

Despite that groundbreaking status, however, Nichols was tempted to quit the show because she felt her role lacked significance. No less than Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. changed her mind. He told Nichols she was a vital role model for black children and young women all across the nation. In fact, former NASA astronaut Mae Jemison credits Nichols’ portrayal of Lt. Uhura for her career inspiration.

And it wasn’t just Jemison that Nichols influenced. After the cancellation of Star Trek, Nichols volunteered for Women in Motion, a NASA minority and female recruitment campaign. Those recruited as a result of her efforts include Dr. Sally Ride, Colonel Guion Bluford, Dr. Judith Resnik and Dr. Ronald McNair. (Below Nichols and other members of the Star Trek cast stand beside the Space Shuttle Enterprise.)

Prior to her role on Star Trek, Nichols sang with the Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton bands, performed in nightclubs and in musical theater, her first true love.  And since the iconic TV show, she has performed in films, made guest appearances on TV, including a recurring role on ABC’s Heroes, and done considerable voiceover work. But no doubt, she will forever be most associated with the role of Lt. Uhura and known as one half of the first interracial kiss on U.S. television (the other half was William Shatner’s Captain James T. Kirk), quite controversial when it occurred in 1968.


















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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 11 2013 at 2:39pm

This is Peter Ramsey, the director for Rise of the Guardians, which incidentally also makes him the first African American to direct a big budget animated motion picture. Besides directing ROTG he already has a hefty resume working as a storyboard artist for countless films including Shark Tale, A.I., and Fight Club.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 11 2013 at 2:54pm
The Snowy Day Ezra Jack Keats

Published in 1962, young Peter was the first African-American main character to be present in children’s picture books.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Alias_Avi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2013 at 11:33am
ETA: I'm providing the link because the author makes interesting comments in the comment section too

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rajiv-malhotra/indian-americans-learn-history_b_2633146.html

Quote

What Indian Americans Can Learn During Black History Month


Rajiv Malhotra

Rajiv Malhotra

Author, 'BEING DIFFERENT: An Indian Challenge to Western Universalism'


February is celebrated as America's Black History Month, making it an opportune time to examine some important relationships between the Indian and black communities in this country. For one, there are longstanding ties between the two peoples that ought to be unearthed and rekindled. Mahatma Gandhi started his civil disobedience movement in South Africa where he spent 21 years honing his political philosophy and leadership skills. The event that became the turning point in his life was when he was thrown off a train, because as a person of color he was not allowed to sit in first-class even though he had a first-class ticket. The indignity of this event, similar to that experienced by all people of color in South Africa at that time, launched him into a life of social and political activism. His movement culminated in the eventual overthrow of the British Empire and colonialism in general.

Gandhi's non-violent struggle later inspired the young Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who studied Gandhi's civil disobedience approach known as satyagraha, and visited India in 1959 for a month. The details of this trip are memorably recounted in his essay, "My trip to the land of Gandhi", published in Ebony magazine in 1959. Martin Luther King Jr. had this to say about the reception he received:

"Since our pictures were in the newspapers very often it was not unusual for us to be recognized by crowds in public places and on public conveyances [...] Virtually every door was open to us. We had hundreds of invitations that limited time did not allow us to accept. We were looked upon as brothers with the color of our skins as something of an asset. But the strongest bond of fraternity was the common cause of minority and colonial peoples in America, Africa and Asia struggling to throw off racialism and imperialism".
The Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr., too, has had recurring contact with India in all the years of his active career. In one trip he spent six months in India prior to the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S.

Recently, in 2008, on the occasion of Gandhi's 60th death anniversary, he delivered the memorial lecture in New Delhi where he remarked, "One can argue that Mahatma Gandhi, known as Bapu (father) to his compatriots, was the spiritual godfather of these world-class figures (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela) who changed the world."

Today, as Indian Americans have become established successfully in their newly adopted country, it is easy to forget the importance of these bonds. We must remember that the 1965 Immigration & Nationality Act which opened the door for large numbers of Asians, Africans and Latin Americans, was enacted against the backdrop of the Civil Rights Movement and the changes in attitude that it created. This reversed the previous system that was designed to maintain the European racial composition of the United States.

Immigrants from India tended to be well-educated, middle-class professionals seeking prosperity, and they hit the ground running to seize the opportunities. Because most Indian Americans arrived after the Civil Rights Act, they did not experience the indignities suffered by African Americans, and because they belonged to the post-Independence generation of India, they hadn't experienced life under colonial rule either. Professional success came relatively quickly to many Indians and this dulled the impetus to appreciate the benefits of a strong collective identity.

The long list of successful Indian Americans is impressive indeed, but it has made many too self-centered and single-minded in economic pursuits. Success has led to the myth that "becoming American" makes a collective identity irrelevant. Few Indian leaders have studied the history of immigration and identity formation of other minorities in America. They are confused about what the hyphenated identity as "Indian-Americans" means, and what their unique American journey and cultural background could contribute to the fabric of this country.

The recent unceremonious dismissal of Citigroup CEO, Vikram Pandit, despite his stellar record, should cause Indian Americans to do some soul searching. Sadly, Pandit found himself without allies on his own board of directors to defend him as one of their own. In fact, none of the board members was close enough to him to even give a hint that he was about to get fired. When he arrived at the fateful board meeting, he had no clue of what was in store for him.

Moreover, this shocking episode went un-scrutinized by our community that feels uncomfortable addressing its vulnerability for being "different." Individual success, based solely on merit, has surely taken us a long way in America. The playing field is level enough to advance up to a point, but without the anchor and security of a collective voice, high-achieving Indians will remain the solitary outsiders, easy to bring down.

What does all this have to do with African Americans, one might wonder? My response is that they have deep memory and understanding of building community organizations in America. Black churches have historically played a strategic role in building a positive selfhood and collective consciousness, and today there are numerous African-American civic organizations with depth and maturity to secure their position. Unlike the case of Indian immigrants, theirs has not been a quick-success journey, but a long, hard one with many valuable lessons learned along the way.

The Reconstruction era after the emancipation of slaves had offered many lessons to African Americans. Ostensibly, it was to be a period when blacks and whites would together rebuild the South, share political power and rehabilitate the former slaves. Indeed, many blacks attained prominent positions, and two blacks were elected as senators. So they felt little need to build separate institutions, imagining that the American melting pot would suffice. The advances made during the Reconstruction, however, proved to be short lived. Soon there was a backlash against blacks and the nation entered the era of Jim Crow laws and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. Freedom from slavery did not mean that whites accepted blacks as true equals in jobs and power. Equality had its limits, especially at times when whites faced economic distress.

It was after this experience that a new kind of African-American leadership emerged with a focus on building a resilient, independent identity with its own institutions. Unified action was encouraged. This groundwork ultimately led to the American Civil Rights Act in the 1960s, just as Gandhi's struggle took nearly half a century of strenuous work before culminating in India's independence. The African-American experience shows us that there is no substitute for grassroots community building and activism, an endeavor that Indian Americans have barely begun. Whether African Americans, Jewish Americans, Hispanic Americans or Muslim Americans, the importance of investing in robust civic organizations based on a solid definition of one's distinct identity has been indispensable in America.

Without such bottom-up community building, we can expect to see more Vikram Pandits, easily booted out. Or, as I wrote in my blog last week, there will be more Bobby Jindals willing to whitewash their ethnicity in order to get ahead. African Americans provide the experience we need for building a distinct identity in this country. Dr. King said it best: "The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community."



Edited by Alias_Avi - Feb 12 2013 at 12:21pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2013 at 11:36am
Originally posted by Ladybird0724 Ladybird0724 wrote:

The Snowy Day Ezra Jack Keats

Published in 1962, young Peter was the first African-American main character to be present in children’s picture books.
 
I used to love this book as a child
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joja1107 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2013 at 6:09pm
Originally posted by Alias_Avi Alias_Avi wrote:


sooooo gooood Clap

I laughed when the white girls started crying Stern Smile

Originally posted by Eden. Eden. wrote:

THE ANGRY EYE






That was a good video. In the 2nd video @ 7:30 until the end was on the money. It is not the same struggle.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote goodm3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 13 2013 at 10:18am
Originally posted by Alias_Avi Alias_Avi wrote:

ETA: I'm providing the link because the author makes interesting comments in the comment section too

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rajiv-malhotra/indian-americans-learn-history_b_2633146.html

Quote

What Indian Americans Can Learn During Black History Month


Rajiv Malhotra

Rajiv Malhotra

Author, 'BEING DIFFERENT: An Indian Challenge to Western Universalism'


February is celebrated as America's Black History Month, making it an opportune time to examine some important relationships between the Indian and black communities in this country. For one, there are longstanding ties between the two peoples that ought to be unearthed and rekindled. Mahatma Gandhi started his civil disobedience movement in South Africa where he spent 21 years honing his political philosophy and leadership skills. The event that became the turning point in his life was when he was thrown off a train, because as a person of color he was not allowed to sit in first-class even though he had a first-class ticket. The indignity of this event, similar to that experienced by all people of color in South Africa at that time, launched him into a life of social and political activism. His movement culminated in the eventual overthrow of the British Empire and colonialism in general.

Gandhi's non-violent struggle later inspired the young Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who studied Gandhi's civil disobedience approach known as satyagraha, and visited India in 1959 for a month. The details of this trip are memorably recounted in his essay, "My trip to the land of Gandhi", published in Ebony magazine in 1959. Martin Luther King Jr. had this to say about the reception he received:

"Since our pictures were in the newspapers very often it was not unusual for us to be recognized by crowds in public places and on public conveyances [...] Virtually every door was open to us. We had hundreds of invitations that limited time did not allow us to accept. We were looked upon as brothers with the color of our skins as something of an asset. But the strongest bond of fraternity was the common cause of minority and colonial peoples in America, Africa and Asia struggling to throw off racialism and imperialism".
The Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr., too, has had recurring contact with India in all the years of his active career. In one trip he spent six months in India prior to the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S.

Recently, in 2008, on the occasion of Gandhi's 60th death anniversary, he delivered the memorial lecture in New Delhi where he remarked, "One can argue that Mahatma Gandhi, known as Bapu (father) to his compatriots, was the spiritual godfather of these world-class figures (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela) who changed the world."

Today, as Indian Americans have become established successfully in their newly adopted country, it is easy to forget the importance of these bonds. We must remember that the 1965 Immigration & Nationality Act which opened the door for large numbers of Asians, Africans and Latin Americans, was enacted against the backdrop of the Civil Rights Movement and the changes in attitude that it created. This reversed the previous system that was designed to maintain the European racial composition of the United States.

Immigrants from India tended to be well-educated, middle-class professionals seeking prosperity, and they hit the ground running to seize the opportunities. Because most Indian Americans arrived after the Civil Rights Act, they did not experience the indignities suffered by African Americans, and because they belonged to the post-Independence generation of India, they hadn't experienced life under colonial rule either. Professional success came relatively quickly to many Indians and this dulled the impetus to appreciate the benefits of a strong collective identity.

The long list of successful Indian Americans is impressive indeed, but it has made many too self-centered and single-minded in economic pursuits. Success has led to the myth that "becoming American" makes a collective identity irrelevant. Few Indian leaders have studied the history of immigration and identity formation of other minorities in America. They are confused about what the hyphenated identity as "Indian-Americans" means, and what their unique American journey and cultural background could contribute to the fabric of this country.

The recent unceremonious dismissal of Citigroup CEO, Vikram Pandit, despite his stellar record, should cause Indian Americans to do some soul searching. Sadly, Pandit found himself without allies on his own board of directors to defend him as one of their own. In fact, none of the board members was close enough to him to even give a hint that he was about to get fired. When he arrived at the fateful board meeting, he had no clue of what was in store for him.

Moreover, this shocking episode went un-scrutinized by our community that feels uncomfortable addressing its vulnerability for being "different." Individual success, based solely on merit, has surely taken us a long way in America. The playing field is level enough to advance up to a point, but without the anchor and security of a collective voice, high-achieving Indians will remain the solitary outsiders, easy to bring down.

What does all this have to do with African Americans, one might wonder? My response is that they have deep memory and understanding of building community organizations in America. Black churches have historically played a strategic role in building a positive selfhood and collective consciousness, and today there are numerous African-American civic organizations with depth and maturity to secure their position. Unlike the case of Indian immigrants, theirs has not been a quick-success journey, but a long, hard one with many valuable lessons learned along the way.

The Reconstruction era after the emancipation of slaves had offered many lessons to African Americans. Ostensibly, it was to be a period when blacks and whites would together rebuild the South, share political power and rehabilitate the former slaves. Indeed, many blacks attained prominent positions, and two blacks were elected as senators. So they felt little need to build separate institutions, imagining that the American melting pot would suffice. The advances made during the Reconstruction, however, proved to be short lived. Soon there was a backlash against blacks and the nation entered the era of Jim Crow laws and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. Freedom from slavery did not mean that whites accepted blacks as true equals in jobs and power. Equality had its limits, especially at times when whites faced economic distress.

It was after this experience that a new kind of African-American leadership emerged with a focus on building a resilient, independent identity with its own institutions. Unified action was encouraged. This groundwork ultimately led to the American Civil Rights Act in the 1960s, just as Gandhi's struggle took nearly half a century of strenuous work before culminating in India's independence. The African-American experience shows us that there is no substitute for grassroots community building and activism, an endeavor that Indian Americans have barely begun. Whether African Americans, Jewish Americans, Hispanic Americans or Muslim Americans, the importance of investing in robust civic organizations based on a solid definition of one's distinct identity has been indispensable in America.

Without such bottom-up community building, we can expect to see more Vikram Pandits, easily booted out. Or, as I wrote in my blog last week, there will be more Bobby Jindals willing to whitewash their ethnicity in order to get ahead. African Americans provide the experience we need for building a distinct identity in this country. Dr. King said it best: "The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community."



This is a great article....and the author makes some great point! And yes, Bobby Jindal has white washed himself. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Rumbera Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 13 2013 at 11:07am
afrolatinoforum:&amp;#10;&amp;#10;André Pinto Rebouças (13 January 1838 – 9 April 1898) was a Brazilian military engineer, abolitionist and inventor, son of Antônio Pereira Rebouças (1798–1880) and Carolina Pinto Rebouças. Lawyer, member of Parliament (representing the Brazilian state of Bahia) and an adviser to Pedro II of Brazil. His father was the son of a manumitted slave and a Portuguese tailor. His mother was an enslaved woman. His brothers Antônio Pereira Rebouças Filho and José Rebouças were also engineers.&amp;#10;Rebouças became famous in Rio de Janeiro, at the time capital of the Empire of Brazil, solving the trouble of water supply, bringing it from fountain-heads outside the town. Serving as a military engineer during the Paraguayan War in Paraguay, Rebouças developed a torpedo, which was used successfully. Alongside Machado de Assis and Olavo Bilac, Rebouças was a very important middle class representative with African descent, he also was one of the most important voices for the abolition of slavery in Brazil. He encouraged the career of Antônio Carlos Gomes, author of the opera O Guarani.&amp;#10;In the 1880s, Rebouças began to participate actively in the abolitionist cause, he helped to create the Brazilian Anti-Slavery Society, alongside Joaquim Nabuco, José do Patrocínio and others.&amp;#10;Reboucas was always very discreet about his color and the prejudice he suffered. He rarely talked about it and there are almost no references to the problem in his diary, used by researchers as an important source of historical information. As an abolitionist, he helped not only the intellectual ideals of abolition, but also in the effective action in motion. His progressive and liberal views counteract all kinds of enslavement, not only black, but fighting against the “re-enslavement by the immigrant owners of the land.” It was one of the few abolitionists who foresaw the deeper implications of the elimination of labor-slave labor. For him the “slavery is not in name but in fact enjoy the work without paying miserable wages or paying only the minimum necessary to keep from starving […] demean and minimize the salary is reescravizar” [… ]&amp;#10;He advocated the emancipation of slaves and regeneration by the acquisition of land ownership. For him the key to the transformation of Brazilian agriculture was changing systems of land tenure.&amp;#10;These ideas are outlined in his best-known book, Agriculture national economic studies: abolitionist propaganda and democratic. He wanted to deploy the country what he called the Brazilian Rural Democracy. His statement: “Whoever owns the land owns the Man,” sums up his stance on social issues of the nineteenth century, besides indicating the relevance of his thought&amp;#10;After the Republican coup d’État, Rebouças went into exile with Pedro II to Europe. For two years he stayed exiled in Lisboa, as a correspondent for The Times of London.In 1892, facing financial problems, Rebouças went to Luanda and after that, Funchal, in Madeira. In 1898 his body was found at the shoreline. He supposedly committed suicide.&amp;#10;[RESOURCES: http://rioeandrerebou.blogspot.com/2012/10/andre-pinto-reboucas-foi-um-exemplo-de.html , http://negrosabolicionismo.blogspot.com/2010/08/andre-reboucas.html, http://www.projectblackman.com/GreatBlackMenInHistory.aspx?notablePersonId=76, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/André_Rebouças ]&amp;#10;&amp;#10;It&amp;#8217;s a wonder! And I see the reason why our history isn&amp;#8217;t taught in schools. Reading about this stuff gives you such a sense of empowerment it&amp;#8217;s unbelievable. Inferiority complexes don&amp;#8217;t stand a chance when you learn about your real true legacies. I&amp;#8217;m not even Brazilian but it doesn&amp;#8217;t matter. ANYTIME I read about African-descendants I swell with pride because that&amp;#8217;s part of my history. A history that nobody cares to teach but you must seek out on your own.

André Pinto Rebouças (13 January 1838 – 9 April 1898) was a Brazilian military engineer, abolitionist and inventor, son of Antônio Pereira Rebouças (1798–1880) and Carolina Pinto Rebouças. Lawyer, member of Parliament (representing the Brazilian state of Bahia) and an adviser to Pedro II of Brazil. His father was the son of a manumitted slave and a Portuguese tailor. His mother was an enslaved woman. His brothers Antônio Pereira Rebouças Filho and José Rebouças were also engineers.

Rebouças became famous in Rio de Janeiro, at the time capital of the Empire of Brazil, solving the trouble of water supply, bringing it from fountain-heads outside the town. Serving as a military engineer during the Paraguayan War in Paraguay, Rebouças developed a torpedo, which was used successfully. Alongside Machado de Assis and Olavo Bilac, Rebouças was a very important middle class representative with African descent, he also was one of the most important voices for the abolition of slavery in Brazil. He encouraged the career of Antônio Carlos Gomes, author of the opera O Guarani.

In the 1880s, Rebouças began to participate actively in the abolitionist cause, he helped to create the Brazilian Anti-Slavery Society, alongside Joaquim Nabuco, José do Patrocínio and others.

Reboucas was always very discreet about his color and the prejudice he suffered. He rarely talked about it and there are almost no references to the problem in his diary, used by researchers as an important source of historical information. As an abolitionist, he helped not only the intellectual ideals of abolition, but also in the effective action in motion. His progressive and liberal views counteract all kinds of enslavement, not only black, but fighting against the “re-enslavement by the immigrant owners of the land.” It was one of the few abolitionists who foresaw the deeper implications of the elimination of labor-slave labor. For him the “slavery is not in name but in fact enjoy the work without paying miserable wages or paying only the minimum necessary to keep from starving […] demean and minimize the salary is reescravizar” [… ]

He advocated the emancipation of slaves and regeneration by the acquisition of land ownership. For him the key to the transformation of Brazilian agriculture was changing systems of land tenure.

These ideas are outlined in his best-known book, Agriculture national economic studies: abolitionist propaganda and democratic. He wanted to deploy the country what he called the Brazilian Rural Democracy. His statement: “Whoever owns the land owns the Man,” sums up his stance on social issues of the nineteenth century, besides indicating the relevance of his thought

After the Republican coup d’État, Rebouças went into exile with Pedro II to Europe. For two years he stayed exiled in Lisboa, as a correspondent for The Times of London.In 1892, facing financial problems, Rebouças went to Luanda and after that, Funchal, in Madeira. In 1898 his body was found at the shoreline. He supposedly committed suicide.

[RESOURCES: http://rioeandrerebou.blogspot.com/2012/10/andre-pinto-reboucas-foi-um-exemplo-de.html , http://negrosabolicionismo.blogspot.com/2010/08/andre-reboucas.html, http://www.projectblackman.com/GreatBlackMenInHistory.aspx?notablePersonId=76, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/André_Rebouças ]

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