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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 4:56pm


racialicious:

The African American woman pictured above, Zelda Wynn Valdez, created the iconic Playboy Bunny uniform (pictured below). From the Huffington Post:

Zelda was revered for her design talent and best known for her skill in highlighting the female body. Her curve-hugging creations were worn and loved by a host of Hollywood’s biggest starlets during the 1940s and 50s, including Joyce Bryant, Dorothy Dandridge, Josephine Baker, Ella Fitzgerald and Mae West. The Pennsylvania-native’s key role in glamorizing these women caught the attention of Playboy’s Hugh Hefner and he commissioned Zelda to design the first-ever Playboy Bunny costumes. And history has proven, the low-cut, skin-tight, sexy outfits are an iconic symbol of seduction and  by Browse to Save" target="_blank">allure, forever ingrained in pop culture.

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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:00pm
pattigurl, all I could really find about crum was this:

A biography commissioned by Crum in 1893 made no mention of his purported invention.[8] It is possible that Crum's sister, Katie Speck Wicks, either made the first discovery herself or in conjunction with Crum.[9] A contemporary source gives credit to Cary Moon's wife, Harriet, stating that she developed the side dish over time.[10]

Detractors of Crum being the inventor of potato chips claim that, even if those prior to him did not call them potato chips, a sliced potato cooked in hot oil and served sprinkled with salt existed before he first made them. Existing cookbooks from that time contradict the claims that Crum and/or his sister invented potato chips. William Kitchiner's book, The Cook's Oracle, [11] includes a recipe for what could be described as a potato chip, even though the cookbook does not use that term to describe it. N.K.M. Lee's cookbook, The Cook's Own Book,[12] has a recipe that is extremely similar to Kitchiner's.


so i suppose that even if he didn't invent it, he made it popular.


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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:23pm
Photo: Redd Foxx and Nina Simone chilling in 1959. They were shot by G. Marshall Wilson (1906-1998), who was a staff photographer for EBONY for 33 years. In other news, this photo will be hanging on my wall in the near future...
Nina Simone and Redd Foxx in 1959
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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:41pm
Photo: Coretta Scott King and her daughter, Yolanda, photographed by Moneta Sleet for EBONY in 1958. Moneta Sleet was the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who took the famous shot of Mrs. King with her daughter Bernice at Dr. Kings funeral in 1968.
Coretta Scott King and her daughter, Yolanda, photographed by Moneta Sleet for EBONY in 1958. Moneta Sleet was the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who took the famous shot of Mrs. King with her daughter Bernice at Dr. King's funeral in 1968.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:54pm
Olympic icon Florence Griffith Joyner, photographed by Irving Penn for Vogue in 1989. Ms. Griffith Joyner won 5 Olympic medals in her career (4 gold, 1 silver) and shattered two world records. The Los Angeles-born athletic superstar was also a superstar of style - designing her own trademark one-legged track suits and wearing brilliantly designed eye-catching nails that matched her outfits and quite often, the stars and stripes of the U.S. flag. "Flo Jo" died in 1998 at the age of 38 due to complications from epilepsy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:16pm
 
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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:18pm
Natchick is killin it! I love the pictures of the Dapper boys! I never knew about that!

I'm thanking all of your posts.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:18pm

Mexico's black history is often ignored

'Mixed race' tends to refer to indigenous and European roots, but the influence of Africa is also strong.

April 13, 2008|John L. Mitchell | Times Staff Writer
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In Mexico, the story of the country's black population has been largely ignored in favor of an ideology that declares that all Mexicans are "mixed race." But it's the mixture of indigenous and European heritage that most Mexicans embrace; the African legacy is overlooked.

"They are saying we are all the same and therefore there is no reason to distinguish yourself," said Padre Glyn Jemmott, a Roman Catholic priest from Trinidad and Tobago who has had a parish of a dozen Costa Chican pueblos since 1984.

"What they are not saying is that in ordinary life in Mexico, lighter-skinned Mexicans are accepted and have first place," he said.

Jemmott, a co-founder of Mexico Negro, an organization that seeks to promote cultural pride and political strength in the coastal pueblos, said many Costa Chicans often don't fully understand what it means to be black in Mexico until they leave their region.

Some tell stories of being confronted in other parts of the country by police who refuse to believe they're Mexican and sometimes accuse them of being there illegally.

"One couple was asked to prove their citizenship by singing the Mexican national anthem," Jemmott said.

In Cuajinicuilapa, in the state of Guerrero, there's a small museum dedicated to telling the story of the black presence in Mexico.

But Costa Chicans often say they learned little in school about how blacks came to live on the coast, little about the history of slavery -- only myths passed down over generations.

"We were told that a Spanish slave ship ran aground off the coast and the survivors escaped to and hid in the mountains, and the blacks today are the descendants of those escaped slaves," said Nino Robles, who was born in Cuajinicuilapa and now lives in Santa Ana with his wife and four daughters.

They were not taught the details of their history: that Spanish slavers took Africans to colonial Mexico (New Spain) in the 16th century, long before the first slaves arrived in Jamestown, Va.; that during the colonial period there were more Africans than Europeans in Mexico.

The Costa Chicans were also not taught that some of the blacks were not slaves; that blacks lived throughout what is now Mexico, working in mining, sugar plantations and fishing.

In some instances black Mexicans were explorers and co-founders of settlements, including Los Angeles.

Jose Maria Morelos, one of Mexico's leaders for independence, was a mulatto, as was Vicente Guerrero, Mexico's second president, who abolished slavery in 1822.

Earlier this year, the California African American Museum in Exposition Park opened a major traveling exhibition, "The African Presence in Mexico," detailing the contribution of Africans to Mexican history and culture.

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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:23pm
Originally posted by Ladybird0724 Ladybird0724 wrote:

pattigurl, all I could really find about crum was this:

A biography commissioned by Crum in 1893 made no mention of his purported invention.[8] It is possible that Crum's sister, Katie Speck Wicks, either made the first discovery herself or in conjunction with Crum.[9] A contemporary source gives credit to Cary Moon's wife, Harriet, stating that she developed the side dish over time.[10]

Detractors of Crum being the inventor of potato chips claim that, even if those prior to him did not call them potato chips, a sliced potato cooked in hot oil and served sprinkled with salt existed before he first made them. Existing cookbooks from that time contradict the claims that Crum and/or his sister invented potato chips. William Kitchiner's book, The Cook's Oracle, [11] includes a recipe for what could be described as a potato chip, even though the cookbook does not use that term to describe it. N.K.M. Lee's cookbook, The Cook's Own Book,[12] has a recipe that is extremely similar to Kitchiner's.


so i suppose that even if he didn't invent it, he made it popular.


thanks ladybird. I had a feeling there were attempts to undermine his contributions.
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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:29pm
Originally posted by PurpleHaze PurpleHaze wrote:

 
Purps I was completely ignorant of this event.
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