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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:54pm
Olympic icon Florence Griffith Joyner, photographed by Irving Penn for Vogue in 1989. Ms. Griffith Joyner won 5 Olympic medals in her career (4 gold, 1 silver) and shattered two world records. The Los Angeles-born athletic superstar was also a superstar of style - designing her own trademark one-legged track suits and wearing brilliantly designed eye-catching nails that matched her outfits and quite often, the stars and stripes of the U.S. flag. "Flo Jo" died in 1998 at the age of 38 due to complications from epilepsy
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PurplePhase View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:16pm
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:18pm
Natchick is killin it! I love the pictures of the Dapper boys! I never knew about that!

I'm thanking all of your posts.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:18pm

Mexico's black history is often ignored

'Mixed race' tends to refer to indigenous and European roots, but the influence of Africa is also strong.

April 13, 2008|John L. Mitchell | Times Staff Writer
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In Mexico, the story of the country's black population has been largely ignored in favor of an ideology that declares that all Mexicans are "mixed race." But it's the mixture of indigenous and European heritage that most Mexicans embrace; the African legacy is overlooked.

"They are saying we are all the same and therefore there is no reason to distinguish yourself," said Padre Glyn Jemmott, a Roman Catholic priest from Trinidad and Tobago who has had a parish of a dozen Costa Chican pueblos since 1984.

"What they are not saying is that in ordinary life in Mexico, lighter-skinned Mexicans are accepted and have first place," he said.

Jemmott, a co-founder of Mexico Negro, an organization that seeks to promote cultural pride and political strength in the coastal pueblos, said many Costa Chicans often don't fully understand what it means to be black in Mexico until they leave their region.

Some tell stories of being confronted in other parts of the country by police who refuse to believe they're Mexican and sometimes accuse them of being there illegally.

"One couple was asked to prove their citizenship by singing the Mexican national anthem," Jemmott said.

In Cuajinicuilapa, in the state of Guerrero, there's a small museum dedicated to telling the story of the black presence in Mexico.

But Costa Chicans often say they learned little in school about how blacks came to live on the coast, little about the history of slavery -- only myths passed down over generations.

"We were told that a Spanish slave ship ran aground off the coast and the survivors escaped to and hid in the mountains, and the blacks today are the descendants of those escaped slaves," said Nino Robles, who was born in Cuajinicuilapa and now lives in Santa Ana with his wife and four daughters.

They were not taught the details of their history: that Spanish slavers took Africans to colonial Mexico (New Spain) in the 16th century, long before the first slaves arrived in Jamestown, Va.; that during the colonial period there were more Africans than Europeans in Mexico.

The Costa Chicans were also not taught that some of the blacks were not slaves; that blacks lived throughout what is now Mexico, working in mining, sugar plantations and fishing.

In some instances black Mexicans were explorers and co-founders of settlements, including Los Angeles.

Jose Maria Morelos, one of Mexico's leaders for independence, was a mulatto, as was Vicente Guerrero, Mexico's second president, who abolished slavery in 1822.

Earlier this year, the California African American Museum in Exposition Park opened a major traveling exhibition, "The African Presence in Mexico," detailing the contribution of Africans to Mexican history and culture.

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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:23pm
Originally posted by Ladybird0724 Ladybird0724 wrote:

pattigurl, all I could really find about crum was this:

A biography commissioned by Crum in 1893 made no mention of his purported invention.[8] It is possible that Crum's sister, Katie Speck Wicks, either made the first discovery herself or in conjunction with Crum.[9] A contemporary source gives credit to Cary Moon's wife, Harriet, stating that she developed the side dish over time.[10]

Detractors of Crum being the inventor of potato chips claim that, even if those prior to him did not call them potato chips, a sliced potato cooked in hot oil and served sprinkled with salt existed before he first made them. Existing cookbooks from that time contradict the claims that Crum and/or his sister invented potato chips. William Kitchiner's book, The Cook's Oracle, [11] includes a recipe for what could be described as a potato chip, even though the cookbook does not use that term to describe it. N.K.M. Lee's cookbook, The Cook's Own Book,[12] has a recipe that is extremely similar to Kitchiner's.


so i suppose that even if he didn't invent it, he made it popular.


thanks ladybird. I had a feeling there were attempts to undermine his contributions.
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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:29pm
Originally posted by PurpleHaze PurpleHaze wrote:

 
Purps I was completely ignorant of this event.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:56pm
Originally posted by pattigurlatl pattigurlatl wrote:

  Purps I was completely ignorant of this event.


I'm Facebook friendsWink with Marsha Warfield. She shares some great info. Got that from her.

 
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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 6:56pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 10:01pm
I'm callin it quits for today.

In all my life, I always knew that women who had children would be born into slavery.

I just came across a slave narrative of a slave who was actually sold at 3 months old. I never knew this to be a possibility. I guess that is ignorance on my part but everything I had every read, and I read alot, never mentioned infants being sold. Pregnant women yes, actual babies no. So it makes me feel a bit melancholy.

I will return tomorrow with more posts and hope others feel inspired to contribute too.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 09 2013 at 8:56am

Another image of Americana is of the south being deeply segregated in all matters, especially during the Civil War period. In reality, in some matters this wasn't so.

In many parts of the Deep South race mixing was tolerated. In fact "[s]o common was mixing among the elites of both races that it came to be institutionalized in `quadroon balls.'" This was a social event were wealthy white men courted prospective mulatto mistresses(1 ).

Even what would be called consensual sex is jaded by the factor of the master slave relationship, and the blacks place in early America society.

Another aspect that would now be considered rape would be the breeding of slaves(2 ).

Out and out rape occurred to Slaves. One ex slave said about her masters sexual advances and his slave women "Old Bufford--his darkies had chillen by him, and Mammy wouldn't do it; and I've seen him take a paddle with holes in it and beat her, and everywhere it hit it raised a blister; then he would take a switch and break them blisters." (3 ).

After repeatedly being raped by her master, on June 23, 1855, a slave woman named Celia warned her master if he did not stop raping her he would hurt him. On her masters next visit to rape her, Celia took a stick and killed her master. During her trial she argued that though she was a slave she had the right to defend her self. The court rejected this argument(3).

Slave men were powerless to protect their wives as this story indicates. "Then there was old Sam Watkins,--he would ship their husbands (slaves) out of bed and get in with their wives. One man said he stood it as long as he could and one morning he just stood outside, and when he got with his wife he just choked him to death. He said he knew it was death, but it was death anyhow; so he just killed him. They hanged him." (4).

It's even been suggest "that the strongest reason why southerners stick with such tenacity to their 'peculiar institution,' is because licentious white men could not carry out their wicked purposes among the defenseless colored population, as they now do, without being exposed and punished by law if slavery was abolished." (5).

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