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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 3:07pm
Originally posted by pattigurlatl pattigurlatl wrote:

Natural chick you are "learning" me somethin'!
Smile
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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 3:19pm
He was allowed to go to battle. But not to Washington.

The first African American war correspondent for a major daily newspaper, the Philadelphia Press, Thomas Morris Chester witnessed Union soldiers with the Army of the Potomac seizing Richmond, Virginia. The Harrisburg native - the son of an escaped slave from Baltimore and an oyster salesman - was one of the city's most famous 19th century African Americans.

As a young man, Chester studied in Liberia, where he became a believer in African colonization. He also served as the editor of the Star of Liberia newspaper and as a school leader.

During the Civil War, Chester served as a recruiter and helped enlist Pennsylvania Black men into the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Regiments. He later helped to raise federal United States Colored Troops (USCT) regiments from his home state. It was reported that Chester led two companies of Blacks for local defense during the Gettysburg campaign in 1863. According to the Harrisburg Telegraph, this was the first time Pennsylvania issued weapons to African Americans. From August 1864 until the end of the conflict Chester was a war correspondent for the Philadelphia Press. He was the first Black reporter for a major daily northern newspaper during the war and traveled with the Army of the Potomac.

After the war, Pennsylvania was the only state to honor African American Union troops, and Chester served in 1865 as grand marshal in their Harrisburg parade.

Chester went on to study law in England. He then held several posts in Louisiana, including collector of customs, brigadier general of militia and superintendent of schools. He returned to Harrisburg in 1892 after falling ill, and died in his mother's home at 305 Chestnut Street. He is buried in Penbrook's Lincoln Cemetery.

Image Courtesy of Newseum

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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 4:16pm
  



 


African-Americans learned to preserve foods through the frying process from Native Americans. However, what led George (Speck) Crum, the son of a Native-American mother and African-American father, to invent the potato chip was not his heritage but an opportunity for revenge.

Born as George Speck in 1828…he adopted the professional name “Crum,” a name his father also used in his career as a jockey. In his early years, Crum worked as a trapper and a mountain guide in the Adirondacks before he realized his talents with food.

In the summer of 1853, Crum was working as a chef at the Moon Lake Lodge, an elegant resort in Saratoga Springs. As the story goes, Crum was cooking in the kitchen one day when a guest sent back the restaurant’s popular French-fried potatoes complaining that they were too thick. An angry Crum grabbed a new potato and sliced it spitefully thin, so thin that the guest would not be able to eat it with a fork. Fried in oil and salted, these crispy potato slices were sent out. And the guest loved them! Crum had stumbled upon what would become America’s favorite snack.

So, it was a complete accident. From then on, the chips, which Crum named “Saratoga Chips,” appeared on the Moon Lake Lodge’s menu as a house specialty.

In 1860 George Crum opened his own restaurant [“Crum’s House”] on Malta Avenue in Saratoga Lake featuring potato chips in baskets on each table. The restaurant was successful for 30 years, serving several rich and famous guests of Saratoga. Crum closed his establishment in 1890, and he died later in 1914 at the age of 86.

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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 4:19pm
Ladybird, I vaguely remember that someone tried to discredit Crum as being the inventor. Do you know anything about that?
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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 4:46pm
^^no, i don't.

I saw it on tumblr, and there wasn't anything about it. if i find some info, i'll put it here.
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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 4:52pm

The Dapper Rebels of Los Angeles, 1966

In "Boys click here" "fashion for dummies" "Featured" "Nostalgia" on January 3, 2013 at 2:02 pm

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In the summer of 1965, riots broke out in the Watts neighborhood of southern Los Angeles. Over a six-day period, 34 people were killed, 1,032 injured and over 3,438 arrests were made. In 1966, LIFE magazine revisited the site of the worst riots America had ever seen in its history. The photo essay depicting the region’s ‘fearsome street gangs’ however, turned out more like a fashion shoot for dapper style…

Click on the images to enlarge.

watts

Decked out in preppy cardigans, high-waisted rolled up trousers and Wayfarers to boot, these young men of South Central Los Angeles were an unmistakably dandy bunch in contrast to the considerably oppressive environment they were living in.

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The African-American community in Watts came to its boiling pointing in August 1965 after years of police discrimination, exclusion from high-paying jobs and residential segregation. Racially restrictive covenants had kept 95 percent of Los Angeles real estate off-limits to the black and Asian communities which severely restricted education and economic opportunities for them.

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Where the black community could buy homes in American suburbia and live out the middle-class dream, significant racial violence escalated. White gangs bombed homes and burnt crosses on the lawns. In response to the assaults, black mutual protection clubs formed and became the basis of the region’s fearsome street gangs.

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In the 1960s, the LAPD was especially known for its police brutality against the city’s Latino and black residents. The police chief, William Parker actually made it a policy for officers to ‘establish dominance’ over young black and Latino teens and pre-teens as a way of showing who was boss. Frequent beatings, wrongful arrests, assaults on women became the norm for the African American community. On the night of August 11th, the intimidation and racial injustices backfired and the Watts’ African American population reached breaking point.

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The riot started after a young African American was pulled over by police officers for suspicion of driving under the influence. When the driver’s family got involved, they were arrested too, including his mother. Local residents gathered and the situation intensified. What starting with yelling escalated to hurling rocks, bricks and whatever they could find at the police. Twenty-nine people were arrested but it did not end there. By the following night Watts was in flames.

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Rioters armed themselves and passionately shouted, “Burn baby burn” and “Long live Malcolm X.” Fires raged for four more days. A civil rights activist, Bayard Rustin wrote, “the whole point of the outbreak in Watts was that it marked the first major rebellion of Negroes against their own masochism and was carried on with the express purpose of asserting that they would no longer quietly submit to the deprivation of slum life.”

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Images found on this interesting Brazilian blog (written in Portuguese), Ubora, about urban retro style.

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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 4:56pm


racialicious:

The African American woman pictured above, Zelda Wynn Valdez, created the iconic Playboy Bunny uniform (pictured below). From the Huffington Post:

Zelda was revered for her design talent and best known for her skill in highlighting the female body. Her curve-hugging creations were worn and loved by a host of Hollywood’s biggest starlets during the 1940s and 50s, including Joyce Bryant, Dorothy Dandridge, Josephine Baker, Ella Fitzgerald and Mae West. The Pennsylvania-native’s key role in glamorizing these women caught the attention of Playboy’s Hugh Hefner and he commissioned Zelda to design the first-ever Playboy Bunny costumes. And history has proven, the low-cut, skin-tight, sexy outfits are an iconic symbol of seduction and  by Browse to Save" target="_blank">allure, forever ingrained in pop culture.

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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:00pm
pattigurl, all I could really find about crum was this:

A biography commissioned by Crum in 1893 made no mention of his purported invention.[8] It is possible that Crum's sister, Katie Speck Wicks, either made the first discovery herself or in conjunction with Crum.[9] A contemporary source gives credit to Cary Moon's wife, Harriet, stating that she developed the side dish over time.[10]

Detractors of Crum being the inventor of potato chips claim that, even if those prior to him did not call them potato chips, a sliced potato cooked in hot oil and served sprinkled with salt existed before he first made them. Existing cookbooks from that time contradict the claims that Crum and/or his sister invented potato chips. William Kitchiner's book, The Cook's Oracle, [11] includes a recipe for what could be described as a potato chip, even though the cookbook does not use that term to describe it. N.K.M. Lee's cookbook, The Cook's Own Book,[12] has a recipe that is extremely similar to Kitchiner's.


so i suppose that even if he didn't invent it, he made it popular.


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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:23pm
Photo: Redd Foxx and Nina Simone chilling in 1959. They were shot by G. Marshall Wilson (1906-1998), who was a staff photographer for EBONY for 33 years. In other news, this photo will be hanging on my wall in the near future...
Nina Simone and Redd Foxx in 1959
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 5:41pm
Photo: Coretta Scott King and her daughter, Yolanda, photographed by Moneta Sleet for EBONY in 1958. Moneta Sleet was the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who took the famous shot of Mrs. King with her daughter Bernice at Dr. Kings funeral in 1968.
Coretta Scott King and her daughter, Yolanda, photographed by Moneta Sleet for EBONY in 1958. Moneta Sleet was the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who took the famous shot of Mrs. King with her daughter Bernice at Dr. King's funeral in 1968.
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