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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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Naturalchick30 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2013 at 7:03pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote india100 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 10:13am
YEAHH!!  Finally a sticky topic . Thumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 2:34pm

About Absalom Jones...

Founder of the
African Episcopal Church
of St. Thomas
1746-1818

Absalom Jones was born into slavery in Sussex County, Delaware, on November 6, 1746. He taught himself to read and knew the New Testament thoroughly at an early age. When he was 16, Absalom's owner took him to Philadelphia, Pa., where he served as a clerk and handyman in a retail store.

THE REV. ABSALOM JONES

He was allowed to work for himself in the evenings and keep his earning. He was married in 1770. By the time Jones was 38 years old, he had purchased his wife's freedom, and his own, and had bought a house. Later he built two more houses and used them for rental income.

During this period he met Richard Allen, and they became lay preachers in St. George's Methodist Episcopal Church and lifelong friends. Their efforts met with great success, and the congregation multiplied tenfold.

Jones and Allen, in 1787, organized the Free African Society. The Society was both religious and benevolent, helping widows and orphans and assisting in sick, relief and burial expenses, and the assimilation of newly freedmen into urban life. Because of racial tensions and an altercation with church officials, they left St. George's congregation.

In 1792, under the leadership of Absalom Jones, "The African Church" was organized as a direct outgrowth of the Free African Society. In 1793, the two men organized the Black community to serve as nurses and attendants during Philadelphia's severe Yellow Fever epidemic.

In 1794, "The African Church" building was completed and dedicated on July 17th of that year. Absalom Jones led his African Church in applying to Bishop William White for membership in the Episcopal Church. On Sunday, September 14, 1794, the congregation was received into the fellowship and communion of he diocese of Pennsylvania. The following year the Diocesan Convention approved the affiliation with the stipulation that the Church could not participate in the Diocesan Convention this was not resolved until 1864. So "The African Church" became The African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, and Absalom Jones was ordained Deacon. Some nine years later he was ordained Priest, becoming the first priest in America of African descent.

In 1797, when the first African Masonic Lodge of Philadelphia was warranted, Absalom Jones was installed as First Worshipful Master and in 1815 he was elected the First Grand Master of the First African Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

During his ministry, Absalom Jones never lost his deep conviction that religious and social action go hand in hand. He founded schools for his people, helped them in distress, and supported them in their protest against slavery and oppression. He helped to found an insurance company, and a society which fought vice and immorality. Absalom Jones died at his home, 32 Powell Street, Philadelphia, Pa., on February 13, 1818. In 1973, the 64th General Convention of the Episcopal Church added his name to the Church calendar as an optional feast to be celebrated.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 2:42pm

Ella Fitzgerald &amp;amp; Marilyn Monroe listening to jazz at Hollywood&amp;#8217;s Tiffany Club (1955)&nbsp;  &amp;#8220;I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt. It was because of her that I played the Mocambo, a very popular nightclub in the &amp;#8217;50s. She personally called the owner of the Mocambo [ed. note: who had refused to book Fitzgerald because she was black], and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night.  She told him - and it was true, due to Marilyn&amp;#8217;s superstar status - that the press would go wild. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard&amp;#8230; After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again. She was an unusual woman - a little ahead of her times. And she didn&amp;#8217;t know it.&amp;#8221;

Ella Fitzgerald & Marilyn Monroe listening to jazz at Hollywood’s Tiffany Club (1955) 

“I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt. It was because of her that I played the Mocambo, a very popular nightclub in the ’50s. She personally called the owner of the Mocambo [ed. note: who had refused to book Fitzgerald because she was black], and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night.

She told him - and it was true, due to Marilyn’s superstar status - that the press would go wild. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard… After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again. She was an unusual woman - a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it.”


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 2:42pm

Alice

Emma Leach: An Astronomical Diary, or Almanack (New London, 1771)

Alice

Alice, known variously as Black Alice, Old Alice, and Alice of Dunk’s Ferry, was a native of Philadelphia and a slave, born to parents who were brought from Barbados. She is said to have been 116 at the time of her death in 1802. She was celebrated in her time as a local historian, having seen Philadelphia develop from an early river settlement to the capital of a new nation, and she was an active member of the historic Christ Church. She likely sat for a portrait due to her respected position in the local community; in this way, the portrait itself is an indication of the heights to which an elderly, illiterate, enslaved woman could ascend. Alice’s portrait appears in the second volume of Eccentric Biography (Worcester, 1804), written by Isaiah Thomas, founder of the American Antiquarian Society. He mentions the following notable traits regarding Alice: her piety, skill as a historian and story teller, capability as a toll worker at a Delaware River ferry crossing, and, most significantly, her longevity. Thomas devotes much of Alice’s entry to tales of her extraordinary vitality, recalling events such as Alice riding horseback at the age of ninety-five and losing and regaining her eyesight as a centenarian.

Eccentric Biography is a dual volume set featuring noteworthy men and women in history. The men included in the first volume were selected for having “sufficiently striking” peculiarities, whereas their female counterparts were “remarkable for some extraordinary deviation from the generality of the sex.” This distinction demonstrates how being a woman was, in and of itself, a deviation from the norm. Furthermore, though both volumes include entries on people distinguished for their physical attributes, only the women’s volume contains a direct reference to such people on its title page.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 3:04pm
Natural chick you are "learning" me somethin'!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 3:07pm
Originally posted by pattigurlatl pattigurlatl wrote:

Natural chick you are "learning" me somethin'!
Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 3:19pm
He was allowed to go to battle. But not to Washington.

The first African American war correspondent for a major daily newspaper, the Philadelphia Press, Thomas Morris Chester witnessed Union soldiers with the Army of the Potomac seizing Richmond, Virginia. The Harrisburg native - the son of an escaped slave from Baltimore and an oyster salesman - was one of the city's most famous 19th century African Americans.

As a young man, Chester studied in Liberia, where he became a believer in African colonization. He also served as the editor of the Star of Liberia newspaper and as a school leader.

During the Civil War, Chester served as a recruiter and helped enlist Pennsylvania Black men into the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Regiments. He later helped to raise federal United States Colored Troops (USCT) regiments from his home state. It was reported that Chester led two companies of Blacks for local defense during the Gettysburg campaign in 1863. According to the Harrisburg Telegraph, this was the first time Pennsylvania issued weapons to African Americans. From August 1864 until the end of the conflict Chester was a war correspondent for the Philadelphia Press. He was the first Black reporter for a major daily northern newspaper during the war and traveled with the Army of the Potomac.

After the war, Pennsylvania was the only state to honor African American Union troops, and Chester served in 1865 as grand marshal in their Harrisburg parade.

Chester went on to study law in England. He then held several posts in Louisiana, including collector of customs, brigadier general of militia and superintendent of schools. He returned to Harrisburg in 1892 after falling ill, and died in his mother's home at 305 Chestnut Street. He is buried in Penbrook's Lincoln Cemetery.

Image Courtesy of Newseum

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African-Americans learned to preserve foods through the frying process from Native Americans. However, what led George (Speck) Crum, the son of a Native-American mother and African-American father, to invent the potato chip was not his heritage but an opportunity for revenge.

Born as George Speck in 1828…he adopted the professional name “Crum,” a name his father also used in his career as a jockey. In his early years, Crum worked as a trapper and a mountain guide in the Adirondacks before he realized his talents with food.

In the summer of 1853, Crum was working as a chef at the Moon Lake Lodge, an elegant resort in Saratoga Springs. As the story goes, Crum was cooking in the kitchen one day when a guest sent back the restaurant’s popular French-fried potatoes complaining that they were too thick. An angry Crum grabbed a new potato and sliced it spitefully thin, so thin that the guest would not be able to eat it with a fork. Fried in oil and salted, these crispy potato slices were sent out. And the guest loved them! Crum had stumbled upon what would become America’s favorite snack.

So, it was a complete accident. From then on, the chips, which Crum named “Saratoga Chips,” appeared on the Moon Lake Lodge’s menu as a house specialty.

In 1860 George Crum opened his own restaurant [“Crum’s House”] on Malta Avenue in Saratoga Lake featuring potato chips in baskets on each table. The restaurant was successful for 30 years, serving several rich and famous guests of Saratoga. Crum closed his establishment in 1890, and he died later in 1914 at the age of 86.

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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 08 2013 at 4:19pm
Ladybird, I vaguely remember that someone tried to discredit Crum as being the inventor. Do you know anything about that?
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