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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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PurplePhase View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (5) Thanks(5)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 06 2013 at 7:09pm
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niecy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote niecy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 06 2013 at 8:16pm
About time they sticky'd this thread! Hopefully it stays up here. Clap 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote teendiva Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 06 2013 at 9:38pm
Originally posted by PurpleHaze PurpleHaze wrote:

Lincoln freed the slaves.

False


Steven Spielberg may believe it but it just ain’t true. A careful reading of Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation proves that it freed NOT A SINGLE SLAVE! In the surprisingly short document only the slaves of “rebellious” states are ordered to be freed; those states who were loyal to America got to keep their Africans—as slaves! Thanks, Lincoln. The “Emancipation Proclamation” lists a whole slew of places to be “left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.” At that time in history, Lincoln actually had no authority over the states where he “freed” the slaves. They were part of another country—the Confederate States of America—with an altogether different president, Jefferson Davis. Lincoln himself was never hesitant to express his hatred of Black people, like when he said: “As the negro is to the White man so is the crocodile to the negro and as the negro may rightfully treat the crocodile as a beast or a reptile so may the White man treat the negro as a beast or a reptile.” It is White historians and Hollywood mythmakers who so desperately needed to find an American Jesus to die for America’s racial sins. It is they who have made Lincoln into something he never was or wanted to be—a martyr on behalf of Black people.

Sources: Lerone Bennett, Jr., Forced into Glory (2007); NOI Research Group, “Lincoln, Lies, and Black Folk,” Pts. 1 and 2, The Final Call, Nov 27 & Dec. 6, 2012.

Yep, I learned this in 10th grade, and I live in the South. But then again I took AP. We specifically learned that the Emancipation Proc. was for the Confederacy, and the 13th Amendment abolished slavery.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote iGotSunshine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2013 at 9:10am
Originally posted by niecy niecy wrote:

About time they sticky'd this thread! Hopefully it stays up here. Clap 
 
IA
be back to add more
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (5) Thanks(5)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2013 at 12:48pm
February 7, 1791

http://www.calvin.edu/contentAsset/raw-data/0e8fabd2-c518-4d06-8dbb-838921f2c86e/bodyimage1/8b0d08f6-58bc-4a8c-b8ab-334576e91a7f.jpg
Benjamin Banneker, inventor, surveyor, mathematician, and astronomer, began to help lay out Washington, DC, under the supervision of Major Andrew Endicott, IV on this date.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2013 at 2:56pm
Woman behind Playboy bunnies outfits was also a sista:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/07/zelda-wynn-valdes-playboy-bunny_n_2637802.html?ref=topbar

Zelda Wynn Valdes
Zelda Wynn Valdes, an iconic fashion designer, is the woman behind the Playboy Bunny outfits.

In celebration of Black History Month we're looking back at groundbreaking moments in fashion, beauty and beyond. There are plenty of firsts, little-known facts and milestones that deserve to be highlighted -- so we're doing just that!


WHO: Zelda Wynn Valdes (or Zelda Barbour Wynn Valdes ), fashion and costume designer

THE MAJOR MOMENT: Zelda was revered for her design talent and best known for her skill in highlighting the female body. Her curve-hugging creations were worn and loved by a host of Hollywood's biggest starletsduring the 1940s and 50s, including Joyce Bryant, Dorothy Dandridge, Josephine Baker, Ella Fitzgerald and Mae West. The Pennsylvania-native's key role in glamorizing these women caught the attention of Playboy's Hugh Hefner and he commissioned Zelda to design the first-ever Playboy Bunny costumes. And history has proven, the low-cut, skin-tight, sexy outfits are an iconic symbol of seduction and allure, forever ingrained in pop culture.

THE COSTUME: 
zelda barbour wynn valdes

FAB FACT: In 1948, Zelda opened her own boutique, "Chez Zelda," on Broadway in New York City, making her the first African-American to own a store on the coveted street. She was also the New York chapter president of the National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designer (NAFAD), a coalition of black designers that was founded by Mary McLeod Bethune.

FAST FORWARD: In 1970, Zelda was approached by Arthur Mitchell to serve as the head costume designer for his then newly-established performance company, the Dance Theatre of Harlem. She spent 18 years with the dance company and retired at the age of 83. From dressing Hollywood darlings, Playboy Bunnies and ballerinas, Zelda's legacy is long and enduring -- a fact that she was certainly proud of. "I just had a God-given talent for making people beautiful," Zelda said during a 1994 interview with The New York Times. Zelda Wynn Valdes died at the age of 96 in 2001. 

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PurplePhase View Drop Down
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Mary Fields, also known as Stagecoach Mary, was the first African-American woman to work as a mail carrier in the United States. She was also the second American woman to work for the United States Postal Service. She was a woman with a very imposing stature, for she stood 6 feet tall and weighed 200 lbs. She also liked to smoke cigars, drink whiskey and she ...carried a pistol for protection.

Born into slavery and emancipated when slavery was outlawed Fields worked as a worker at a Native American mission. There she worked the fields, did laundry, tended to animals, etc. She also owned and managed a restaurant where she fed those with money and without. Mary answered to no one and defended herself with her mouth, fists and pistol.

At the age of 60 years old, Fields was hired as a mail carrier and to work for the USPS.  She drove the route with horses and a mule named Moses.  She never missed a day, and her reliability in any weather or circumstance earned her the nickname "Stagecoach." In the 1996 TV movie The Cherokee Kid, Fields was played by Dawn Lewis, and in the 2012 TV movie Hannah's Law she was played by Kimberly Elise.

 



Edited by PurpleHaze - Feb 07 2013 at 6:39pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (5) Thanks(5)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2013 at 6:38pm

Mary McLeod Bethune
http://www2.talbot.edu/ce20/educators/images/mary_bethune.jpg


The true worth of a race must be measured by the character of its womanhood. - Mary McLeod Bethune

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2013 at 6:47pm


http://www.chicagotribute.org/Images/Binga%20portrait.jpg
Once nearly the richest Black man in Chicago ( by some accounts he was) Jesse Binga was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1865. He moved to Chicago to start a bank in 1908.

The bank was made primarily for African-Americans, since during that time many banks would not allow African-Americans in. The Great Migration came, and Binga State Bank grew more popular.

Jesse Binga grew to be a rich man and eventually he and his wife bought a house at 5922 South Park Avenue, which is now known as King Drive, which was a strictly white neighborhood. His house was bombed five different times by racist neighbors.

In 1929 the Great Depression hit, and Binga Bank was forced to close. Then bank examiners said that Binga State Bank was run illegally and Jesse Binga was sent to jail on a ten year sentence. After a few years Binga was released thanks to many protests and petitions. Binga was given a $15 a week job as a janitor at St. Anselm's Church. He died at age 85.

Jesse Binga was once one of the richest men of his time, but when the depression hit he lost everything and died as a poor man in June 1950.

Binga was an honorary member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Naturalchick30 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2013 at 6:56pm
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