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The Official Black History Thread!!!! (GREAT READ)

 
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Prazol60 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Prazol60 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 29 2013 at 1:07pm
**cough** I am sure this will be penned soon...right? 
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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 29 2013 at 5:38pm
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Once there was a woman whose cells were immortal. What does this mean? Today, these cells have multiplied in laboratories worldwide to the point that, if you were to weigh all the cells that currently exist, they’d weigh about 50 million metric tons—about as much as 100 Empire State Buildings. So who was this woman, and why are scientists keeping her cells supplied with fresh nutrients so they can live on?

The woman was Henrietta Lacks, and her immortal cells—dubbed "HeLa"—have been essential in many of the great scientific discoveries of our time: curing polio; gene mapping; learning how cells work; developing drugs to treat cancer, herpes, leukemia, influenza, hemophilia, Parkinson’s disease, AIDS … and the list goes on and on (and on). If it deals with the human body and has been studied by scientists, odds are those scientists needed and used Lacks' cells somewhere along the way. HeLa cells were even sent up to space on an unmanned satellite to determine whether or not human tissue could survive in zero gravity.

Lacks was an impoverished black woman who died on October 4, 1951 of cervical cancer at just 31 years old. During her cancer treatment, a doctor at Johns Hopkins took a sample of her tumor without her knowledge or consent and sent it over to a colleague of his, Dr. George Gey, who had been trying for 20 years, unsuccessfully, to grow human tissues from cultures. A lab assistant there, Mary Kubicek, discovered that Henrietta’s cells, unlike normal human cells, could live and replicate outside the body.

Go to just about any cell culture lab in the world and you’ll find billions of HeLa cells stored there. In contrast to normal human cells, which will die after a few replications, Lacks' cells can live and replicate just fine outside of the human body (which is also unique among humans). Give her cells the nutrients they need to survive, and they will apparently live and replicate along forever, almost 60 years and counting since the first culture was taken. They can be frozen for literally decades and, when thawed, they'll go right on replicating.

Before her cells were discovered and widely cultured, it was nearly impossible for scientists to reliably experiment on human cells and get meaningful results. Cell cultures that scientists were studying would weaken and die very quickly outside the human body. Lacks' cells gave scientists, for the first time, a “standard” that they could use to test things on. HeLa cells can survive being shipped in the mail just fine, so scientists across the globe can use the same standard to test against.

Lacks died of uremic poisoning, in the segregated hospital ward for blacks, about 8 months after being diagnosed with cervical cancer, never knowing that her cells would become one of the most vital tools in modern medicine and would spawn a multi-billion dollar industry. She was survived by her husband and five children; the family lived in poverty for most of their lives, and didn't find out about the fate of Lacks' incredible cells until years later.




Edited by Ladybird0724 - Jan 29 2013 at 5:40pm
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goodm3 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote goodm3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 9:31am
BUMMMMPPPP Lets revive this thread for Black History Month!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (6) Thanks(6)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 12:06pm

The Greensboro 4






On February 1, 1960, At 4:30PM, Four Freshmen From North Carolina A&T    -- Ezell Blair, Jr., David Richmond, Joseph McNeil And Franklin McCain, Sat Down At The Lunch Counter Of The Local F. W. Woolworth Store  At 132 South Elm Street In Greensboro, North Carolina, And Ordered Coffee And Cherry Pie. This Bold Act Defied The Jim Crow Laws That Permitted Blacks To Shop In The Store But Not Eat A Meal There. After Being Refused Service, The Young Men Began Reading Their Textbooks, Sending The Message That They Were Not Leaving Until They Were Served Or The Store Closed.

The "Greensboro 4," As They Were Called, Returned The Next Morning With More A&T Students. On Wednesday 70 Students Joined The Protest, Including Women From Nearby Bennett College And Some White Students From Other Local Schools. By This Time The Greensboro Sit-In Had Become A National News Story.

On Thursday, 150 A&T Students Moved Down The Street And Staged A Similar Sit-In In The S. H. Kress & Co. Store. Other Demonstrations Began Taking Place Throughout The South.

The Greensboro Sit-In Is Credited With Re-Igniting The Civil Rights Movement In America -- Transforming The Older Generation's "Don't-Rock The-Boat" Tactics To A More Militant, Protest-Based Platform.




Edited by PurpleHaze - Feb 01 2013 at 12:08pm
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Junior Jr View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (7) Thanks(7)   Quote Junior Jr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 12:08pm
can this be stickied instead of the tired gabby douglas thread?
 
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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (9) Thanks(9)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 12:11pm
It should be stickied but the admins keep removing it. Shouldn't be a February thing either. Black history is history.
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Ladybird0724 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (7) Thanks(7)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 12:38pm
here are some children's books that talk about famous black people that are usually not discussed during the month. when i taught 3rd, these books were really big w/ my class:

Rons Big Mission
Based on the life of Ron McNair (he was on the challenger shuttle). As a young boy, he became the first AA in his town to have a library card.

Henrys Freedom Box: A True Story from the Underground Railroad
Henry Brown shipped himself in a box up North to escape slavery




I, Matthew Henson: Polar Explorer
Matthew Henson discovered the North Pole. He wasn't credited for the discovery for years afterwards

The Story Of Ruby Bridges: Special Anniversary Edition
Ruby Bridges integrated an all-white school in NO

The Last Black King of the Kentucky Derby: The Story of Jimmy Winkfield
Jimmy Winkfield was the last AA to win the KY derby and is considered one of the best jockeys ever

Perfect Timing: How Isaac Murphy Became one of the Worlds Greatest Jockeys
Issac Murphy was another jockey



thats all that i can think of for now...enjoy


Edited by Ladybird0724 - Feb 01 2013 at 12:41pm
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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 7:29pm
Bump to make this a sticky.
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purple.chuckz View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (6) Thanks(6)   Quote purple.chuckz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 7:46pm
EVERY ONE NEEDS TO READ THIS BOOK. It is an amazing read. Download it, check it out from your local library.... 

It is an ode to the endurance of African Americans.  The book goes into details about the migrations of 3 different African Americans from the South to the West, Midwest and North; and also sprinkles bits of history and statistics in the narrative.  It's extremely heartbreaking and uplifting. 

It only took me a week to read all 600pages; that's how good this book is.  Knowing one's history will set you free. 

Check out the author's website. 







The Great Migration, which comes to life in the pages of this book, lasted from 1915 to 1970, involved six million people and was one of the largest internal migrations in U.S. history. It changed the country, North and South. It brought us jazz, Motown, rhythm and blues,  hip hop. It brought us John Coltrane, Thelonius Monk, Jimi Hendrix, Toni Morrison, August Wilson, Romare Bearden, Malcolm X, Jesse Owens, Bill Russell, Denzel Washington, Michelle Obama — all children or grandchildren of the Great Migration. It changed the cultural and political landscape of America, exerting pressure on the South to change and paving the way toward equal rights for the lowest caste people in the country.

Based on interviews with 1,200 people who participated in the Migration and on newly available census analyses and research into archival material, The Warmth of Other Suns tells one of the greatest underreported stories in American history. It is the story of how the northern cities came to be, of the music and culture that might not have existed had the people not left, the consequences North and South and, most importantly, of the courageous souls who dared to leave everything they knew for the hope of something better.

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pattigurlatl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pattigurlatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 11:34pm
thanks purp.c
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