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Sportscaster: Blacks Need to Stop Blaming Whites

 
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SeducTress View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SeducTress Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:02pm
Originally posted by babelipsss babelipsss wrote:

@Seduc Tress.

We do need to stop some of the blame game. It serves no real purpose. We should work on our internal problems more. Like the breakdown of the family. How can we blame that on whites?

Wassup.

Why the screw face?
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SeducTress View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SeducTress Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:02pm
Thanks Samone!

I don't mind it being long. Sort of expect it to be given the topic.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote JasmineE02 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:03pm
Maybe we should turn this into the African American research literature thread. LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote babelipsss Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:03pm
Seduc it was a confused face. I couldn't see where you were going with your example.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SeducTress Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:04pm
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


the article is lobger than what I am posting

Children who survive urban warfare suffer from PTSD, too


  • Tierra Turner thinks as she waits at the door of her home in the Bayview, April 11, 2007, in San Francisco, Ca. (Lacy Atkins San Francisco Chronicle)   ** Tierra Turner MANDATORY CREDITFOR PHOTGRAPHER AND SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE/NO SALES-MAGS OUT Photo: Lacy Atkins
    Tierra Turner thinks as she waits at the door of her home in the Bayview, April 11, 2007, in San Francisco, Ca. (Lacy Atkins San Francisco Chronicle) ** Tierra Turner MANDATORY CREDITFOR PHOTGRAPHER AND SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE/NO SALES-MAGS OUT Photo: Lacy Atkins

Tierra Turner's older brother was shot and killed on a busy Bayview street last summer.

By the time Tierra, 11, arrived at the scene with her mother, a yellow tarp covered 18-year-old Anthony Brooks' body. Nearby, a second tarp covered his friend, Monte Frierson.

Standing outside the police tape, Tierra broke down, her small body heaving with sobs.

Two weeks later, Tierra started the sixth grade.

Along with a Tinker Bell backpack and pink Princess cell phone, she carried the deaths with her to Visitacion Valley Middle School each day, absentmindedly writing "RIP Ant and Monte" on the cover of her notebooks and in sidewalk chalk on the playground. As the months passed, her grades slipped and her temper often flared.

At her school, the principal and staff see the signs and symptoms of trauma-related stress in many of their students - the hostile outbursts, the sliding grades, the poor test scores or the inability to pay attention.

They are among the countless children in San Francisco's toughest neighborhoods who experience murder, violence and trauma - an often unavoidable consequence of living in an urban war zone.

The violence, layers of it overlapping year after year, can eventually take up residence in the children's minds. Like combat veterans, they develop post-traumatic stress disorder - the soldier's sickness.

As many as one-third of children living in our country's violent urban neighborhoods have PTSD, according to recent research and the country's top child trauma experts - nearly twice the rate reported for troops returning from war zones in Iraq.

Los Angeles Unified officials conduct annual surveys, finding similar rates of PTSD within the schools in that city's most violent neighborhoods. Implementing a group treatment program, one developed by the district, has come in fits and starts, however.

In the Bay Area and across the country, meanwhile, PTSD in these urban children is generally undiagnosed, untreated and almost completely off the radar for policymakers and education officials.

A Stanford University researcher, however, believes schools should be on the front lines when it comes to recognizing and treating children with symptoms of PTSD, and has identified Visitacion Valley Middle School as the ideal place to test a therapy involving 17 one-on-one sessions with a trained counselor.

"We have to pay a lot more attention to this," said Dr. Victor Carrion, director of the Stanford Early Life Stress Research Program. "PTSD basically feeds on avoidance. The more you avoid it, the worse it gets."

But Carrion lacks ongoing funding and said the study has stalled despite a waiting list of students at the school.

Nearly a third of the 105 students in Tierra's sixth-grade class at Visitacion Valley said they have seen or knew someone killed with a gun, according to a poll school officials administered last fall.

"The violence permeates the lives of the children," said school Principal James Dierke. "It's something they carry around with them like a coat, all day long."

Yet, these children, while hurt and scared, can be helped.

Tierra's trauma is recognized

The F-word flew smoothly out of Tierra's mouth as if it had been there before, which it had.

The profanity didn't faze Dierke, who sat beside her in his office in June, a day before school let out for the summer.

Tierra continued the rant - something about a boy she wanted to beat up. It wouldn't have been the first fistfight the girl waged, punching larger opponents with the full force of her 110 pounds on her 5-foot, one-inch frame.

Dierke didn't blink at Tierra's language or tough talk. She wasn't in trouble. The two were just chatting.

"Are you going to summer school?" Dierke asked, changing the subject. "You need to."

She didn't look at him when she said yes.


http://www.sfgate.com/education/article/Children-who-survive-urban-warfare-suffer-from-2524472.php


Yup!
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SamoneLenior View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:05pm

but Jasmine studies are pointless lol
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote SeducTress Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:06pm
Originally posted by babelipsss babelipsss wrote:

Seduc it was a confused face. I couldn't see where you were going with your example.

Gotcha

We're all over the place in here.

I was sharing my experience of witnessing symptoms of trauma. 

The little girl who's constantly tense, my little sis who's subconsciously still a paranoid child.

Man this is so sad. 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SeducTress Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:06pm
Originally posted by JasmineE02 JasmineE02 wrote:

Maybe we should turn this into the African American research literature thread. LOL

Big smileBig smileBig smileBig smileBig smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote CherryBlossom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:07pm
Originally posted by JasmineE02 JasmineE02 wrote:

http://thinkprogress.org/health/2014/01/16/3175831/myth-absent-black-father/
*pins shiny gold star on jasmine's chest*Approve lemme post this in it's entirety...Embarrassed

The Myth Of The Absent Black Father

BY TARA CULP-RESSLER  

"The Myth Of The Absent Black Father"

 

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black dad

CREDIT: SHUTTERSTOCK

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published new data on the role that American fathers play in parenting their children. Most of the CDC’s previous research on family life — which the agency explores as an important contributor to public health and child development — has focused exclusively on mothers. But the latest data finds that the stereotypical gender imbalance in this area doesn’t hold true, and dads are just as hands-on when it comes to raising their kids.

That includes African-American fathers.

In fact, in its coverage of the study, the Los Angeles Times noted that the results “defy stereotypes about black fatherhood” because the CDC found that black dads are moreinvolved with their kids on a daily basis than dads from other racial groups:

black fatherhood

CREDIT: LOS ANGELES TIMES

In some cases, the differences between black fathers and white or Latino fathers weren’t statistically significant. Nonetheless, the fact that there’s no dramatic drop-off for African-American fathers is still a surprising revelation for some people.

Considering the fact that “black fatherhood” is a phrase that is almost always accompaniedby the word “crisis” in U.S. society, it’s understandable that the CDC’s results seem innovative. But in reality, the new data builds upon years of research that’s concluded that hands-on parenting is similar among dads of all races. There’s plenty of scientific evidence to bust this racially-biased myth.

The Pew Research Center, which has tracked this data for years, consistently finds no big differences between white and black fathers. Gretchen Livingston, one of the senior researchers studying family life at Pew, wasn’t at all surprised by the new CDC data. “Blacks look a lot like everyone else,” she pointed out.

Although black fathers are more likely to live separately from their children — the statistic that’s usually trotted out to prove the parenting “crisis” — many of them remain just as involved in their kids’ lives. Pew estimates that 67 percent of black dads who don’t live with their kids see them at least once a month, compared to 59 percent of white dads and just 32 percent of Hispanic dads.

And there’s compelling evidence that number of black dads living apart from their kids stems from structural systems of inequality and poverty, not the unfounded assumption that African-American men somehow place less value on parenting. Equal numbers of black dads and white dads tend to agree that it’s important to be a father who provides emotional support, discipline, and moral guidance. There’s one area of divergence in the way the two groups approach their parental responsibilities: Black dads are even more likely to think it’simportant to financially provide for their children.

Dr. Roberta L. Coles, a sociology professor at Marquette University, has also researched black fathers for nearly a decade. Her most well-known work includes The Best Kept Secret: Single Black Fathers and The Myth of the Missing Black Father: The Persistence of Black Fatherhood in America. Like Pew, Coles has also found that even though black dads may be less likely to marry their kids’ mothers, they typically remain involved in raising their children.

In an interview with the Grio this week, Coles explained that she’s invested in continuing to challenge the prevailing stereotypes in this area. “It’s important to get it out there that that’s not the whole picture,” Coles noted. “People need to know there are men out there trying to do their best.”

That’s the same reason that Kenrya Rankin Naasel recently published Bet On Blacka collection of essays in which African-American women share their stories of being raised by great fathers. “For years, we’ve all been bombarded with statistics that scream our men are not up to the important task of fathering,” she explained in an interview with BET about her project. “Ultimately, I hope that Bet On Black challenges the rhetoric about our families and changes the conversation to one that celebrates rather than denigrates.”

Despite the concrete evidence to dispel the prevailing assumptions about black dads, the conversation is still dominated by headlines like “What’s the Problem with Black Fathers?” and “Who’s Your Daddy: The Epidemic Of Absent Black Fathers.” President Obama has drawnsome criticism for repeatedly delivering speeches about the importance of fatherhood to nonwhite audiences. And this past fall, when Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson’s two-year-old son tragically passed away, the media wasted no time falling back on all the stereotypes about irresponsible black dads.

The resistance to the research in the field may speak to the fact that racially-motivated stereotypes are particularly hard to break out of. For instance, despite the wealth of evidence disproving Americans’ assumptions about welfare recipients, the deeply-ingrained myth of the “welfare queen” remains.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote afrokock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:07pm
doc im sure youve posted that ptsd thread here before

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