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Sportscaster: Blacks Need to Stop Blaming Whites

 
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femmemichelle View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote femmemichelle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:43am
No one is denying the effects of institutional and systematic racism.  I see the effects of it every day. However, NO. We can't blame all of our problems on racism. It just doesn't make any sense when people do things willingly to screw themselves over that are devoid of race issues. For example, black men willingly choosing to abandon their children or outright refusing to care for their children is not the direct result of whitey's foot on their neck. It's a personal, irresponsible choice that's destroying our community. 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote SeducTress Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:44am
Another tidbit.

I've shared on here my relationship with my little sis.

I have to tell you she's my foster sister out of context... not from a place of malice.

Anyway.

I remember asking my mom why she kept her stuff in those trashbags.

Till this day my moms reply still get's me in my feelings.

"She's always lived out of those bags. She doesn't think she'll be here long"

Maaaaaaaaaaan. Water works. Not then. I was a youngin so I couldn't really appreciate that statement. It made me uncomfy and sad.

But now? Sheesh.

She was 11 years old. She refused to unpack. 
She's 25 years old now. You will still find her clothes chilling in trash bags. Trauma.


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femmemichelle View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote femmemichelle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:44am
Originally posted by afrokock afrokock wrote:

Originally posted by femmemichelle femmemichelle wrote:

Originally posted by CherryBlossom CherryBlossom wrote:

http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2014/07/bob-costas-says-people-stop-blaming-whites-black-peoples-problems/[URL=http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2014/07/bob-costas-says-people-stop-blaming-whites-black-peoples-problems/" rel="nofollow]<h1 ="post-title="" entry-title"="" style="margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 7px; margin-left: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 2em; line-height: 38px; font-family: 'Playfair Display', times, serif; color: rgb34, 34, 34;]Bob Costas Says People Should Stop Blaming Whites for Black People’s Problems</h1>[/URL]<span style="color: rgb34, 34, 34; font-family: Lora, georgia, times, serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;"></span><div ="credit"="" style="margin: 0.85em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb176, 144, 112; font-family: ' Sans', Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 24px;">
<div ="credit"="" style="margin: 0.85em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb176, 144, 112; font-family: ' Sans', Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 24px;"><span ="date="" updated="" postdate"="" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb38, 38, 38; font-family: Lora, georgia, times, serif; font-size: 18px; line-height: 27px;">“Historically the narrative of white racism and the oppression of black Americans is the overriding truth. It’s the single greatest stain on our national history. It is still part of narrative. But that narrative is much more complex now. And some of the issues that are afflicting black America are not the result of white racism,” said Costas.

</span>
 

Misleading ass title because nothing Costas said was a lie. Not every problem in the black community is bred from white racism. Some of it we do to ourselves. Who the hell would negate that? Or would it just sound better coming out of a black mouth? People get so defensive when other communities see the cracks in our own. 
 

Well... Don't just stand there.. justify your argument, 

You have piqued our interest.. 

We are listening

Response has been posted. Big smile I had other things piquing my interest...like life. 
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afrokock View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (7) Thanks(7)   Quote afrokock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:46am
Originally posted by femmemichelle femmemichelle wrote:

No one is denying the effects of institutional and systematic racism.  I see the effects of it every day. However, NO. We can't blame all of our problems on racism. It just doesn't make any sense when people do things willingly to screw themselves over that are devoid of race issues. For example, black men willingly choosing to abandon their children or outright refusing to care for their children is not the direct result of whitey's foot on their neck. It's a personal, irresponsible choice that's destroying our community. 


the cycle of poverty

but continue
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afrokock View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (12) Thanks(12)   Quote afrokock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:48am
Originally posted by femmemichelle femmemichelle wrote:

Originally posted by afrokock afrokock wrote:

Originally posted by femmemichelle femmemichelle wrote:

Originally posted by CherryBlossom CherryBlossom wrote:

http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2014/07/bob-costas-says-people-stop-blaming-whites-black-peoples-problems/[URL=http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2014/07/bob-costas-says-people-stop-blaming-whites-black-peoples-problems/" rel="nofollow]<h1 ="post-title="" entry-title"="" style="margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 7px; margin-left: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 2em; line-height: 38px; font-family: 'Playfair Display', times, serif; color: rgb34, 34, 34;]Bob Costas Says People Should Stop Blaming Whites for Black People’s Problems</h1>[/URL]<span style="color: rgb34, 34, 34; font-family: Lora, georgia, times, serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px;"></span><div ="credit"="" style="margin: 0.85em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb176, 144, 112; font-family: ' Sans', Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 24px;">
<div ="credit"="" style="margin: 0.85em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb176, 144, 112; font-family: ' Sans', Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 24px;"><span ="date="" updated="" postdate"="" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb38, 38, 38; font-family: Lora, georgia, times, serif; font-size: 18px; line-height: 27px;">“Historically the narrative of white racism and the oppression of black Americans is the overriding truth. It’s the single greatest stain on our national history. It is still part of narrative. But that narrative is much more complex now. And some of the issues that are afflicting black America are not the result of white racism,” said Costas.

</span>
 

Misleading ass title because nothing Costas said was a lie. Not every problem in the black community is bred from white racism. Some of it we do to ourselves. Who the hell would negate that? Or would it just sound better coming out of a black mouth? People get so defensive when other communities see the cracks in our own. 
 

Well... Don't just stand there.. justify your argument, 

You have piqued our interest.. 

We are listening

Response has been posted. Big smile I had other things piquing my interest...like life. 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote babelipsss Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:49am
@Seduc Tress.

We do need to stop some of the blame game. It serves no real purpose. We should work on our internal problems more. Like the breakdown of the family. How can we blame that on whites?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:53am

the article is lobger than what I am posting

Children who survive urban warfare suffer from PTSD, too


  • Tierra Turner thinks as she waits at the door of her home in the Bayview, April 11, 2007, in San Francisco, Ca. (Lacy Atkins San Francisco Chronicle)   ** Tierra Turner MANDATORY CREDITFOR PHOTGRAPHER AND SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE/NO SALES-MAGS OUT Photo: Lacy Atkins
    Tierra Turner thinks as she waits at the door of her home in the Bayview, April 11, 2007, in San Francisco, Ca. (Lacy Atkins San Francisco Chronicle) ** Tierra Turner MANDATORY CREDITFOR PHOTGRAPHER AND SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE/NO SALES-MAGS OUT Photo: Lacy Atkins

Tierra Turner's older brother was shot and killed on a busy Bayview street last summer.

By the time Tierra, 11, arrived at the scene with her mother, a yellow tarp covered 18-year-old Anthony Brooks' body. Nearby, a second tarp covered his friend, Monte Frierson.

Standing outside the police tape, Tierra broke down, her small body heaving with sobs.

Two weeks later, Tierra started the sixth grade.

Along with a Tinker Bell backpack and pink Princess cell phone, she carried the deaths with her to Visitacion Valley Middle School each day, absentmindedly writing "RIP Ant and Monte" on the cover of her notebooks and in sidewalk chalk on the playground. As the months passed, her grades slipped and her temper often flared.

At her school, the principal and staff see the signs and symptoms of trauma-related stress in many of their students - the hostile outbursts, the sliding grades, the poor test scores or the inability to pay attention.

They are among the countless children in San Francisco's toughest neighborhoods who experience murder, violence and trauma - an often unavoidable consequence of living in an urban war zone.

The violence, layers of it overlapping year after year, can eventually take up residence in the children's minds. Like combat veterans, they develop post-traumatic stress disorder - the soldier's sickness.

As many as one-third of children living in our country's violent urban neighborhoods have PTSD, according to recent research and the country's top child trauma experts - nearly twice the rate reported for troops returning from war zones in Iraq.

Los Angeles Unified officials conduct annual surveys, finding similar rates of PTSD within the schools in that city's most violent neighborhoods. Implementing a group treatment program, one developed by the district, has come in fits and starts, however.

In the Bay Area and across the country, meanwhile, PTSD in these urban children is generally undiagnosed, untreated and almost completely off the radar for policymakers and education officials.

A Stanford University researcher, however, believes schools should be on the front lines when it comes to recognizing and treating children with symptoms of PTSD, and has identified Visitacion Valley Middle School as the ideal place to test a therapy involving 17 one-on-one sessions with a trained counselor.

"We have to pay a lot more attention to this," said Dr. Victor Carrion, director of the Stanford Early Life Stress Research Program. "PTSD basically feeds on avoidance. The more you avoid it, the worse it gets."

But Carrion lacks ongoing funding and said the study has stalled despite a waiting list of students at the school.

Nearly a third of the 105 students in Tierra's sixth-grade class at Visitacion Valley said they have seen or knew someone killed with a gun, according to a poll school officials administered last fall.

"The violence permeates the lives of the children," said school Principal James Dierke. "It's something they carry around with them like a coat, all day long."

Yet, these children, while hurt and scared, can be helped.

Tierra's trauma is recognized

The F-word flew smoothly out of Tierra's mouth as if it had been there before, which it had.

The profanity didn't faze Dierke, who sat beside her in his office in June, a day before school let out for the summer.

Tierra continued the rant - something about a boy she wanted to beat up. It wouldn't have been the first fistfight the girl waged, punching larger opponents with the full force of her 110 pounds on her 5-foot, one-inch frame.

Dierke didn't blink at Tierra's language or tough talk. She wasn't in trouble. The two were just chatting.

"Are you going to summer school?" Dierke asked, changing the subject. "You need to."

She didn't look at him when she said yes.


http://www.sfgate.com/education/article/Children-who-survive-urban-warfare-suffer-from-2524472.php


Edited by SamoneLenior - Jul 11 2014 at 11:53am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:55am

COMMUNITY VIOLENCE-RELATED PTSD IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS


Homicide has become the leading cause of death
among minority adolescent males in some inner
city areas. Recent media attention has been focused
on the plight of inadvertent victims of violent street
crime, and the issue of community violence is now
recognized as a major public health issue—more
than a criminal justice problem—especially among
youths. Early studies of youths’ experiences with
community violence focused primarily upon the
issue of recidivism anong adolescent perpetrators.
More recently, studies have begun to examine a
spectrum of community violence and its traumatic
consequences to youth victims.
This article is intended to provide an up-to-date
overview of this relatively new area of trauma study.
To narrow the definition of community violence for
the purposes of this article, distinction is made
between studies of crime-related trauma, which are
most often conducted with adult samples, and stud­
ies of community violence exposure in children and
adolescents. (See Resnick & Kilpatrick, 1994, for an
overview of crime-related PTSD among adults.)
Several types of possible violent interpersonal events
among youths are examined. In the context of the
ongoing national epidemic of inner city violence,
key risk factors are identified for victimization of
children and adolescents. Findings from recent stud­
ies examining violence-related PTSD symptomatol­
ogy in adolescent survivors are then presented.
Methodologic issues in operationally defining and
assessing key variables in the study of community
violence-related PTSD are discussed, and selected
instruments that have proven useful are described.
Finally, the article raises two critical clinical issues
for future direction: treatment of community vio­lence-related
distress in adolescents; and violence pre­vention efforts.

http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/newsletters/research-quarterly/V9N4.pdf
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote JasmineE02 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 11:57am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 12:01pm

from what Jasmine posted

And there’s compelling evidence that number of black dads living apart from their kids stems from structural systems of inequality and poverty, not the unfounded assumption that African-American men somehow place less value on parenting. Equal numbers of black dads and white dads tend to agree that it’s important to be a father who provides emotional support, discipline, and moral guidance.

I clicked the link and found this

By the 1980s and 1990s, however, unlimited welfare was seen as problematic. The Clinton administration made a push to get women off the rolls. One of the ways to do that was to increase the help women received from noncustodial fathers, primarily through enforcing child-support payments. But when agencies tried to track down fathers and get them to pay, they found that many men were unemployed or underemployed and unable to meet their obligations. Community groups that had already been working to help men get job training and steady employment now had the federal government's attention through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, which was created by the 1996 welfare-reform bill.

While TANF made maintaining two-parent families a goal, its primary focus was economic support for low-income parents and their children. That focus changed in 2001, when Bush started the National Healthy Marriage Initiative, devoting $90 million to marriage-promotion programs. The funding was administered by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), a division of the Department of Health and Human Services. And the programs -- which were essentially marriage-counseling sessions -- were based on the idea that declining marriage rates and ascending divorce rates were the source of society's problems and that promoting marriage would be the cure.

There is, as yet, no hard evidence that the programs work at reducing poverty. Groups that help coordinate these programs, like the National Fatherhood Initiative, cite many personal stories of couples who say the programs were helpful. It's easy to see how a forum in which husbands and wives can talk about their frustrations and problems as a couple make them feel better. It's harder to see how that may translate into food on the table and college tuition for their children.

But there are stories of people who say they benefit. Dawit Solomon, a 29-year-old who was raised by a single mother, finished a class last year that he says has changed his relationship with his 10-year-old son. Solomon's girlfriend got pregnant in his senior year of high school, and they did not marry. For most of his relationship with her and their son, Daquan, Solomon felt his main purpose was to pay child support. "I didn't feel like I didn't have responsibilities," he said. "I didn't know what it's like to be a dad."

After he fell behind on his child support, Solomon was ordered by the court to attend fatherhood classes with a group in Alexandria, Virginia. He could have stopped going after three classes but chose to finish the 12-week course and has emerged as its evangelist. "I was always angry at the system, felt like it was always unfair to the father," he said. That anger reached back into his relationship with his absent father, extended to his relationship with his son's mother, and refracted, he now feels, to affect the relationship he had with his son. He often saw Daquan on weekends but would plop him in front of a video game while he went about his business. The class taught him to let go of his anger and to spend time with his son.

Solomon's class used curriculum from the National Fatherhood Initiative, a group founded in 1994 that has helped shape the nationwide efforts to address fatherless families. A former president of the group, Wade Horn, was tapped by Bush to shape many of the ACF's healthy-marriage policies. Before joining the ACF, Horn wrote, "States should begin by eliminating systemic preferences that give advantages to single-parent families over two-parent, married families. But making welfare neutral when it comes to marriage is grossly insufficient." That children of single parents needed more help was irrelevant.

When Congress reauthorized TANF in 2006, it shifted away from promoting two-parent households as a means to help reduce poverty rates to promoting marriage as a goal in and of itself, setting aside $150 million for programs designed to encourage healthy marriages. (The grants were authorized for five years.) A 2006 statement from the ACF decries "divorce, cohabitation, and out-of-wedlock childbearing" before it even mentions low-income children. When children are mentioned, it's to note that the ACF already has contact with them through several poverty-reduction programs. The language that established the new fatherhood and marriage-promotion programs did not limit them to low-income families. They could be used by any father or couple.

And that's the problem, some community groups say. These programs weren't focused on addressing poverty, and they supplanted more practical efforts such as job training and job placement, which had to compete for funding. Groups that work directly with mothers and fathers of low-income children are split on whether the programs were helpful at all, according to a report from the Center for Family Policy and Practice. Many groups think the programs are beside the point: Low-income men have basic problems staying stably employed, housed, and fed. Even groups that felt the marriage programs were useful and helped their clients did not think they were important outside the context of job-training, skills-training, and other economic-support programs.

"I don't even want to judge whether or not an individual mother or father or person wants that kind of service or needs it or can benefit from it," says the center's co-director, Jacquelyn Boggess. "We all can benefit from that. But to actually take away the services that respond to economic insecurity and then put in the one about being a better spouse or parent. ... I can't see that as beneficial."

In the meantime, Erick King, who, along with his twin brother, created the fatherhood class in Alexandria, said the group is trying to get federal funding, but the signals from the federal government are ambiguous. The program has so far relied on private donations totaling about $100,000. King, 31, was inspired by his own troubled history with his father and his work as a juvenile probation officer. Through his work with juveniles in the court system, King has come to believe one of the primary reasons young people get in trouble is a lack of parenting at home. "It's the root of the problem," he says. "There's no substitute for the father being in their life. If that's the root cause, let's address it at the root cause."

King says the men come to the class with a range of experiences, but the absence of their own fathers is a commonality. Twenty-seven men graduated last year, the first year of the program's existence, and about 80 percent were referred through the court system because of child support or family court cases. The men ranged in age from their teens to their 60s and mostly represented the bottom of the income ladder, making no more than about $40,000 a year. The group uses a curriculum supplied by the National Fatherhood Initiative but also tries to respond to the needs of the men they meet, including job-placement programs. This year, meeting with job-assistance groups will be a requirement to pass. But graduating just means showing up and participating in most of King's classes, which involve sessions in which men talk about their relationships to their father, take their children on community outings, and hear lectures from domestic-violence experts. There is no nationally recognized fatherhood curriculum. And while King follows the men post-graduation by communicating with their caseworkers, it's too early to tell what kinds of outcomes programs like his will produce.




Edited by SamoneLenior - Jul 11 2014 at 12:02pm
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