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NuAttitude View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NuAttitude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 12:31pm
Originally posted by Az~Maverick Az~Maverick wrote:

Originally posted by carolina cutie carolina cutie wrote:

The cap'in is alive, eh? All of those dead, including so many kids...I wonder how he'll be able to live with himself.


B....but...isn't  El Capitan supposed be the last one leaving the ship?

I'm sure he'll have some 'splainin' to do....
 
Urrrm, yea.....I've heard the captain always goes down with his ship, plane, whatever he's navigating!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Starrygurl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 12:49pm
Damn so sad? 287 missing? I am thinking it's a small ferry, omg.Shocked Jerk of a captain. That reminds me of that Italian or Greek ship and the captain was the first to leave and didn't care.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Starrygurl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 12:56pm
Originally posted by tatee tatee wrote:

Quote Survivors blamed the high number of missing passengers on the ship's crew issuing repeated announcements that passengers should stay put even when the ship began tilting dramatically, said Yonhap.


Confused Why they always say that? In case of a emergency remain calm, xyz. Um no.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lilaca Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 4:33pm
So they got to find the missing plane and these passengers....2014...not a good year.

I hope they find them :'(
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tatee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 18 2014 at 8:30am

Vice Principal Rescued From Sinking Ferry Found Hanged

Taylor Berman


Vice Principal Rescued From Sinking Ferry Found HangedExpand

The vice principal of a South Korean high school who was rescued from a sinking ferry full of his students was found hanged to death on Friday.

Police say the vice principal, Kang Min Kyu, used his belt to hang himself from a tree outside a gymnasium in Jindo, where relatives of missing passengers have gathered for updates. Kang was reportedly one of the first people rescued from the ship.

The death toll from the Sewol ferry disaster now stands at 28, though, with about 270 people still missing, it's expected to rise dramatically. Divers briefly breached the ship's hull on Friday but were forced to turn back because of bad weather.

"The guide line that links the sunken ship and the rescue vessel has been cut off," the South Korean Coast Guard said. "Still, the entrance into the ship is open, and we plan to resume operation to enter the ship."

Officials are investigating whether a third mate's decision to order a sharp turn caused the boat to capsize. The abrupt turn took place at about 8:49 am, just ten minutes before the ferry's first distress call, though officials cautioned they don't yet know if the turn was made voluntarily or not.

Transcripts from the boat, obtained by the Associated Press, show the captain's order to abandon ship came roughly 30 minutes after an official at the Jeju Vessel Traffic Services Center told the boat to prepare the boat for evacuation. From the AP:

In the recording of the conversation, the Sewol crewmember says: "Currently the body of the ship has listed to the left. The containers have listed as well."

The Jeju VTS officer responds: "OK. Any loss of human life or injuries?" The ship's answer is: "It's impossible to check right now. The body of the ship has tilted, and it's impossible to move."

The VTS officer then says "Yes, OK. Please wear life jackets and prepare as the people might have to abandon ship."

"It's hard for people to move," replies the crew member on the radio.

Oh Yong-seok, a helmsman on the ferry, told the AP that the first instructions from the captain were for passengers to put on life jackets and stay where they were, Oh said.

About 30 minutes later, the captain finally gave the order to evacuate, Oh said, adding that he wasn't sure in the confusion and chaos on the bridge if the order was relayed to the passengers. Several survivors told the AP that they never heard any evacuation orders.

Lee Joon-Seok, the captain, has made one brief statement since the incident: "I am really sorry and deeply ashamed," Lee said in a video. "I don't know what to say."

Meanwhile, distraught family members awaiting word about their missing loved ones described their anguish to reporters.

"I want to jump into the water with them," Park Geum-san, 59, the great-aunt of a missing student, told the Associated Press. "My loved one is under the water and it's raining. Anger is not enough."

Vice Principal Rescued From Sinking Ferry Found HangedExpand

Family members of passengers gathered in a gym in Jindo, where they await updates about the disaster.

Vice Principal Rescued From Sinking Ferry Found HangedExpand

http://gawker.com/vice-principal-rescued-from-sinking-ferry-found-hanged-1564602516

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SoutherNtellect Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 18 2014 at 8:47am
Originally posted by NuAttitude NuAttitude wrote:

Originally posted by Az~Maverick Az~Maverick wrote:

Originally posted by carolina cutie carolina cutie wrote:

The cap'in is alive, eh? All of those dead, including so many kids...I wonder how he'll be able to live with himself.


B....but...isn't  El Capitan supposed be the last one leaving the ship?

I'm sure he'll have some 'splainin' to do....
 
Urrrm, yea.....I've heard the captain always goes down with his ship, plane, whatever he's navigating!

i thought this was just me watching too much Titanic
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote liesnalibis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 18 2014 at 3:54pm
How can I still be amazed by how low some people on this earth are?


South Korea ferry disaster: Fake survivor posts add to nation's anguish


(CNN) -- Disgust, anger and shock greeted official statements from South Korean authorities that texts and social media posts from survivors trapped inside the stricken ferry had been faked.

Messages such as "I am still alive... in the cafeteria please help me my battery is running out please believe me," and "My phone is not working I am inside the boat I can't see anything" were spreading on social media on Thursday -- as late as over 24 hours after the incident.

The messages gave extra substance to hope at least some of the hundreds of missing passengers were alive and awaiting rescue.




News and rumors of the texts circulated around families of the missing. The purported texts contained so much detail, they made relatives "surprised and excited," one mother said earlier this week.

The texts also fueled a tense atmosphere at Jindo -- where distraught families viewed them as proof several passengers were alive. This led to remonstrations and the hurling of objects at authorities, who relatives accused of not doing enough to save their children.

"An investigation from the Police Cyber Terror Response Center verified that all texts in question [from passengers still within the ship] are fake," South Korea police posted on its official Twitter account.

"Please stop such actions that are causing pain to the families of missing passengers. The malicious distributors of these texts will be strictly dealt with."

South Korea has been gripped by this tragedy and the pronouncement of these fake social posts added to the collective anguish -- especially as social media has been playing a crucial role in relaying information from the site.

Police successfully put out a call on social media to find any relatives of a rescued six-year-old girl who had been on board with her parents and older brother.

The revelations of fake posts have added to a growing sense of public confusion, mistrust and escalating frustration -- particularly among the passengers' relatives -- over the handling of the search and rescue operations, media coverage and official releases of information.

Nationwide grief

Across the country, scheduled festivals, concerts and school field trips are among the events that have been canceled.

TV networks have been carrying the search virtually non-stop since the incident.

All news and top searched keywords on the main Internet portals remain linked to the ship, while wishes for good news are flooding social media.

"Hoping everyone will be returned to the arms of their families ... Please be strong. Remembering the SEWOL disaster ..." tweeted Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu.

"All I can hope for is that our friends will return alive ..." tweeted Kim Min Hyuk, a senior at the high school that sent 325 students and 15 teachers on a field trip aboard the ill-fated ferry.

READ: Woman, 71, survives because stranger wouldn't give up on her

READ: Anguish over South Korean ferry sinking amplified by misinformation

READ: How likely is it there are still survivors?

CNN's Madison Park in Jindo contributed to this report.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote liesnalibis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 18 2014 at 3:57pm
They've charged the captain.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tatee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 19 2014 at 3:43pm

Breaking Proud Tradition, Captains Flee and Let Others Go Down With Ship

By CHRISTOPHER DREW and JAD MOUAWAD

Photo
A sketch of the capsized ferry stood near relatives waiting for missing passengers in South Korea. Credit Uriel Sinai for The New York Times

Ever since the Titanic sank on its maiden voyage, carrying its captain and many of the passengers with it, the notion that the captain goes down with his ship has been ingrained in popular culture.

But now, for the second time in just over two years, a sea captain — first in Italy and now in South Korea — has been among the first to flee a sinking vessel, placing his own life ahead of those of his terrified passengers.

A much-publicized photo from the latest accident shows the Korean captain being helped off his own ship, the Sewol, stepping off the deck to safety even as scores of his ferry passengers remained below where survivors believe they became trapped by rushing water and debris.

The behavior has earned the captain, Lee Jun-seok, 69, the nickname the “evil of the Sewol” among bloggers in South Korea. It also landed him in jail.

Maritime experts called the abandonment shocking — violating a proud international (and South Korean) tradition of stewardship based at least as much on accepted codes of behavior as by law.

Photo
Lee Jun-seok, left, the second captain in two years to flee a sinking vessel, was later arrested. Credit Yonhap/Reuters

“That guy’s an embarrassment to anybody who’s ever had command at sea,” said John B. Padgett III, a retired United States Navy rear admiral and former submarine captain.

His sentiments were echoed by Capt. William H. Doherty, who has commanded Navy and merchant ships and managed safety operations at a major cruise line. He called Mr. Lee’s decision to leave his 447 passengers “a disgrace,” and likened it to the desertion of the stricken Costa Concordia cruise ship off the Italian coast in 2012. “You can’t take responsibility, or say you do, for nearly 500 souls, and then be the first in the lifeboat,” he said.

Civil courts in the United States have long viewed captains as having an obligation to protect their passengers and ships, but the cases in South Korea and Italy seem likely to test the notion of criminal liability in disasters.

The captain of the Italian ship, Francesco Schettino, is on trial on manslaughter charges after the sinking of his ship left more than 30 people dead.

The death toll in the South Korean accident stood at 36 as of late Saturday, with 266 missing.

Most countries do not explicitly state that a captain must be the last person to leave a distressed ship, experts say, giving captains the leeway to board lifeboats or nearby ships if they can better command an evacuation from there. South Korea’s law, however, appears to be explicit, allowing the authorities to arrest Mr. Lee for abandoning the boat and its passengers in a time of crisis. An international maritime treaty known as the Safety of Life at Sea — first adopted in 1914 after the Titanic disaster — makes a ship’s captain responsible for the safety of his vessel and everyone on board. A later version of the treaty said that passengers should be able to evacuate within 30 minutes of a general alarm.

The Sewol took two and a half hours to sink, but many survivors have reported that the crew told passengers it was safer to stay put inside the ship, likely dooming them. (The captain says he later issued instructions for passengers to evacuate the ship, but it remains unclear if that was conveyed to passengers.)

The United States Navy’s rules are more explicit than ones for commercial ships. Dave Werner, Naval History and Heritage Command spokesman, said that Navy rules dating to 1814 require a captain to remain with a stricken ship as long as possible and salvage as much of it as he can.

Mr. Werner cited current regulations that state, “If it becomes necessary to abandon the ship, the commanding officer should be the last person to leave.”

The list of military and commercial ship captains who refused to abandon ship is a long one.

Continue reading the main story

NORTH KOREA

SOUTH

KOREA

Yellow

Sea

Ferry route

JINDO

Approximate

site of ferry

sinking

JEJU

50 MILES

The Titanic’s captain, E. J. Smith, was probably steaming too fast when the giant ship hit an iceberg, but he later won praise for helping to save more than 700 lives. He insisted that women and children be evacuated first, and he stayed near the bridge as the ship went down.

After the Andrea Doria collided with another vessel off Nantucket in 1956, the captain, Piero Calamai, pledged to remain on his own on the listing ship after the passengers were evacuated to try to save it. He agreed to abandon the vessel only when other officers refused to leave without him.

When the Navy’s first Cold War spy submarine, the Cochino, caught fire and was about to sink in the Barents Sea not far from Russia in 1949, the captain, Cmdr. Rafael C. Benitez, refused to abandon the surfaced submarine even after all his men had run across a wooden plank connecting them to another vessel heaving in the rough seas.

Commander Benitez, who was hoping to save the Cochino, crossed the plank to safety only when the men on the other vessel yelled that his sub was sinking fast. This sense of a captain’s duty was also part of the narrative in the crash of US Airways Flight 1549, which was forced to ditch in the Hudson River after losing power in both engines after it struck birds. After landing the plane on the water, Capt. Chesley B. Sullenberger III twice checked the sinking cabin to make sure no one was left before leaving himself.

And sometimes the heroes are fellow passengers.

In 1991, a 500-foot-long Greek-owned cruise ship called the Oceanos flooded off the coast of South Africa in 30-foot swells after an engine explosion. Instead of evacuating the 571 people on board, the captain and his crew left, claiming later that they went to seek help.

According to news accounts at the time, a magician who had been on board to provide entertainment radioed for help and coordinated the rescue effort from the bridge. The magician, Robin Bolton, was among the last people to leave the ship along with members of the South African Navy who were dropped aboard to search for any stragglers.

Everyone survived.

The Sewol had its own heroes and heroines.

One, Park Ho-jin, 16, found a 6-year-old girl standing alone and wet on the side of the ship as it was sliding slowly into the water. She had been left there by her older brother who went back into the ship to hunt for their mother. Mr. Park swept the child into his arms and delivered her to rescuers who had pulled a boat alongside the ship. Mr. Park made it onto a later rescue boat.

Another high school student who survived reported that a crew member named Park Ji-young, 22, had helped teenagers to get life jackets and escape by urging them to jump into the frigid waters of the Yellow Sea where rescue boats were waiting. She stayed behind without a life jacket for herself despite the youngsters’ entreaties to jump with them. “After saving you, I will get out,” she said. “The crew goes out last.”

She was later found dead, floating in the sea.

Correction: April 19, 2014

An earlier version of this article misspelled the given name and surname of the captain of the Andrea Doria. He was Piero Calamai, not Peiro Calamari.


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/world/asia/in-sad-twist-on-proud-tradition-captains-let-others-go-down-with-ship.html?hp&_r=2

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tatee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 19 2014 at 3:49pm

Captain and Two Crew Members Are Arrested in Korean Ferry Sinking

By CHOE SANG-HUN and SU-HYUN LEE



JINDO, South Korea — The captain and two crew members of a ferry that capsized, leaving more than 270 people — most of them students — missing, were arrested early Saturday, the authorities said.

The captain, Lee Jun-seok, 69, was charged with abandoning the boat and its passengers at a time of crisis, among other counts, according to prosecutors. Mr. Lee as well as the third mate, a 26-year-old woman who the authorities said was steering the ship at the time of accident on Wednesday, and another crew member were taken to jail with their hands cuffed after a judge approved their arrest warrants. The crew members also faced numerous charges.

“I bow before the people and grieved families and apologize,” Mr. Lee told reporters as he was led to jail. He added that he “partly” accepted the charges against him.

Not long after the arrests, officials said that divers had discovered three bodies inside the submerged vessel.

As hope dwindled that any of the 236 missing students would be found alive, their high school was stunned Friday by more tragic news: the death of its vice principal in what was suspected to be a suicide.

Photo
The Korean ferry's captain, Lee Jun-seok, was seen being rescued from the sinking vessel on Wednesday. Credit South Korean Coast Guard, via European Pressphoto Agency

The vice principal, Kang Min-kyu, 52, of Danwon High School, who survived the ferry accident, was found hanging from a tree near a gymnasium where families of the missing had gathered. The police suspected Mr. Kang had hanged himself.

“It’s too much, being alive alone while more than 200 of my students are missing,” he wrote in a note found in his wallet, according to the police. “Please place all the blame on me because I was in charge of the trip. Please cremate my body and scatter the ashes where the ship sank. Perhaps I should be a teacher for those missing children in the other world.”

On Friday, investigators said that Mr. Lee, the ship’s captain, who has been criticized for being among the first to leave the sinking ship, was not at the steering house when the ferry, the Sewol, tilted and began sinking on Wednesday morning.

“He temporarily left the steering command to his third shipmate,” said Park Jae-uk, a senior investigator.

The captain returned to the bridge as soon as the ship began tilting, Mr. Park said. The South Korean news agency Yonhap reported that the third mate had a year of experience steering ships, five months of it on the 6,825-ton Sewol.

Photo
As the captain and crew members of a capsized ferry were arrested, a relative of a missing passenger waited for news. Credit Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters

The arrests came after more potential clues emerged as to how the ferry’s trip to the resort island of Jeju, which began Tuesday night in Incheon, a port west of Seoul, turned into one of South Korea’s worst disasters in decades. As of Saturday evening, 32 deaths had been confirmed.

Officials confirmed on Friday that they were investigating whether the ship, under the third mate’s command, made too sharp a turn on a curve in the sea route. They have raised the possibility that the vehicles and other heavy cargo on the ferry might not have been properly secured, in which case they could have slid to one side when the turn was made, causing the ship to tilt.

Also Friday, prosecutors raided the offices of the ship’s operator, the Cheonghaejin Marine Company, and a shipyard to investigate allegations that Cheonghaejin added more cabin rooms, probably making the ship top-heavy, to accommodate more passengers after buying the 20-year-old ferry from Japan in 2012. Although the Sewol passed balancing and other safety tests, officials were looking into whether the suspected structural change contributed to the accident.

They were also investigating widespread accounts that the crew had urged passengers to stay in their quarters even as the ship was sinking, instructions that may have resulted in many people being trapped.

Mr. Lee said that his ship broadcast instructions for passengers to stay put inside “because rescue boats had not arrived yet.” He said that he eventually advised passengers to evacuate, but he did not clarify when. He also did not say whether his evacuation order was properly delivered to passengers amid the chaos.

Photo
Lee Jun-seok, the ferry's captain, was brought into court in Mokpo, South Korea, on Friday. Credit YONHAP, via Associated Press

Mr. Lee also said that he was visiting his bedroom cabin briefly when the accident happened. He denied he was intoxicated at the time.

The captain said the ship began showing signs of trouble at 8:50 a.m. Wednesday. The ship sent its first distress signal eight minutes later.

The third mate, who was in charge at the bridge while Mr. Lee was away, did not respond to reporters’ questions on Saturday as she was led out of the courtroom. But a 55-year-old coxswain, the third crew member arrested, said that the ship was attempting a usual turn on the shipping route when it swerved more rapidly than expected.

On Friday evening, hundreds of students held a candlelight vigil for Mr. Kang, the vice principal, on the school grounds in Ansan, a city south of Seoul. One student held a message for the missing students that said: “We are waiting. Please come back alive.”

On Thursday evening, families threw water bottles at fellow teachers who had visited the gymnasium and knelt before the families in apology. Mr. Kang was not there, and his colleagues had asked the police to find him.

Continue reading the main story

NORTH KOREA

Seoul

Incheon

SOUTH

KOREA

Yellow

Sea

Ferry route

JINDO

Approximate

site of ferry

sinking

JEJU

50 MILES

“He must have felt a terrible sense of guilt,” said Whang Sang-min, a professor of psychology at Yonsei University in Seoul. “He must have suffered unbearable regrets for not going against the ship’s instruction and immediately evacuating his students.”

After two days of futile efforts, South Korean divers on Friday managed to enter the capsized ferry where many of the 273 missing people were feared to have been trapped when the ship sank. But officials warned Friday that the work would be painstaking and difficult.

One of the leaders of the diving effort, Hwang Dae-sik, said Friday that underwater visibility at the site was so poor and currents so rapid that the work was “like moving against the wind of a typhoon while barely being able to see your palm.” Currents were moving diagonally across the hull, creating swirls and making it tricky for divers to enter the ship, he said.

“We have been trying to put ropes into the ship so that we can use them as guides as we crawl into the ship in the darkness and hopefully bring out missing people,” Mr. Hwang, a senior official with the Maritime Rescue and Salvage Association, said in an interview.

Using such ropes, two divers managed to enter the ship’s cargo deck but returned without finding anyone, officials said.

Despite the slow pace of the work and the days that have passed since the sinking, the news that the divers had entered the ship raised hope among hundreds of parents who have been waiting on this nearby island that survivors might yet be found.

Rescuers were also using high-pressure hoses to pump oxygen into the ship, which by Friday was completely underwater, a tiny tip of its hull occasionally appearing between the waves. The rescuers were hoping that the oxygen would reach people who might yet be alive in air pockets within the submerged vessel.

Four cranes arrived on the scene on Friday as officials prepared for the eventual salvaging of the vessel. But experts said it would take days, if not weeks, to complete the difficult task of raising the ship.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/world/asia/captain-and-two-crew-members-are-arrested-in-korean-ferry-sinking.html?action=click&contentCollection=Asia%20Pacific&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article


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