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tatee View Drop Down
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    Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 2:58pm

The School-to-Prison Pipeline Is Targeting Your Child

The Advancement Project's Judith Brown Dianis on how minor infractions land Black and Latino children in major trouble
Zerlina Maxwell
By Zerlina Maxwell Contributing Writer
     

Photo courtesy of

Youth Justice Coalition


The School-to-Prison Pipeline Is Targeting Your Child

Most of us have heard the term the “school-to-prison” pipeline, but perhaps you aren’t completely clear on what it is or how it works.  A new video by the Advancement Project that uses throwback clips of classic television shows, “The Cosby Show” and “Saved By the Bell,” is meant to illustrate exactly what drives the mass incarceration of Black and Latino youth.  The video highlights the fact that kids today are more poorly behaved than in the past, but that punishment for even minor disciplinary infractions in school casts them criminals.  When Zach Morris was disciplined for using a phone in class, we didn't see Mr. Belding calling the cops.

“It has been this way for a long time but in the 1980s, there was a shift in the discourse around young people and there was this new term used to describe them, 'superpredator.'  Young people had been dubbed superpredators right in the middle of the crack cocaine epidemic and the height of the war on drugs,” Judith Browne Dianis, co-director of the Advancement Project, told EBONY.com.  “The intersection of these things, were the leading cause to a crackdown on young people’s [behavior].”

“Schools then started to adopt 'zero tolerance policies' along with drug sniffing dogs and metal detectors. Then came the 1990s, with the Drug Free School Zones Act which requires expulsion for carrying a gun on school grounds.  Zero tolerance policies are the kind of discipline that requires a particular kind of exclusion and it is a practice of harsh discipline.”



It wasn’t always like this.  Before and during part of the 1980s, kids engaged in many of the same behaviors that are the grounds for suspension and expulsion now.  Talking on a cell phone, having a food fight in the cafeteria, lateness, dress code violations,disrupting class----minor infractions that used to result in a trip to the principal’s office and maybe a few days of detention.  Now, these types of behaviors can result in criminal penalties, fines, and young people getting caught up in the criminal justice system with ramifications that can last a lifetime. 

“In Chicago, twenty-five young people were involved in food fight in the cafeteria and instead of being punished by having to clean up the cafeteria, they were suspended from school and arrested,” says Browne Dianis.

Behavior that isn’t usually an criminal offense becomes one thanks to zero tolerance policies that are often enforced by former police officers---who usually are not trained beyond their law enforcement backgrounds and often lack the skills to deal with young people.  Rambunctious teenage behavior gets turned into a 'disorderly conduct'  violation complete with punishment and court fees.  Your child could be arrested for running in the hallway.

“The [education and criminal justice] systems depend on each other.  You put a young person out of school and there are other systems that benefit from that.  Instead of being about learning discipline is now about punishment.” says Browne Dianis.  Corrections officers, probation officers, and private prisons all benefit if more kids are kicked out of school and put into the criminal justice system.  These systems thrive off of more and more bodies being moved into their system via mass incarceration and the more young people who get driven into the criminal justice system, the more money many of these institutions make."

"Black and brown students within this framework suffer the worst fate.  When a student is disciplined for “disrespect” or for rolling their eyes at an authority figure within the school, the consequences are subjectively doled out.  “Black students are more likely to be suspended for subjective things and bias could be part of it."

The punishment does not result in better behavior, nor is it a deterrent.  Adds Brown Dianis “We know suspensions don’t work.  If you are suspended, you are more likely to fail academically and wind up in the juvenile justice system.”  According to a recent report by the Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the University of California, Los Angeles Civil Rights Project, a single suspension in the ninth grade doubles the odds for a student dropping out of high school.

“It’s the overreaction from adults and sometimes it’s not even something the kid is doing to warrant such harsh discipline.  [Suspensions and expulsions] don’t fix anything because they don’t get to the root cause of behavior.”

Browne Dianis says that this system of criminalizing run of the mill youthful indiscretions has an unequal impact on Black children and results in essentially the racial profiling of Black students in American schools. 

“Black children are being pushed out and dehumanized by this system.”


Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/news-views/the-school-to-prison-pipeline-is-targeting-your-child-405#ixzz2lsi8L0RK
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LovesHim View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote LovesHim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 3:21pm
Yes.... As a person who works in the public school system I am very aware of the school to prison pipeline..

Education.... and specifically the ability to read is soooooo important to our community..... 

I wish I could convince other educators and parents of this though..... sighhhhh 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 510QUEEN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 3:46pm
that was a good video
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mommykat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 5:52pm
...

Thanks nice read and vid...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Ladybird0724 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 6:25pm
yes, the school/prison pipeline is real and thriving. what was that big city that just closed a bunch of schools but was building a 400M prison? Philly? I can't remember

and tbh I believe that it has (in part) something to do w/ the educators of the inner city schools.

inexperienced white teachers who know nothing about our culture and way of being, no understanding of our struggles are usually in inner city classrooms.

i don't remember if the article mentioned this, but also the large # of black children who are tested and considered "special ed" has something to do w/ it as well, but that is a whole other article.

this is why our community needs to hold education in a higher regard. parents need to be in the schools, on the PTA, volunteering in the classrooms and at the board mtgs advocating for our chilren. too many parents are not connected to their school. yes, schools can do better with making that connection, but so can parents.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Az~Maverick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 6:44pm
Originally posted by Ladybird0724 Ladybird0724 wrote:

yes, the school/prison pipeline is real and thriving. what was that big city that just closed a bunch of schools but was building a 400M prison? Philly? I can't remember

and tbh I believe that it has (in part) something to do w/ the educators of the inner city schools.

inexperienced white teachers who know nothing about our culture and way of being, no understanding of our struggles are usually in inner city classrooms.

i don't remember if the article mentioned this, but also the large # of black children who are tested and considered "special ed" has something to do w/ it as well, but that is a whole other article.


this is why our community needs to hold education in a higher regard. parents need to be in the schools, on the PTA, volunteering in the classrooms and at the board mtgs advocating for our chilren. too many parents are not connected to their school. yes, schools can do better with making that connection, but so can parents.

This is why homeschooling, if able, should become more popular for our people. And let's not forget about the lack of cultural studies, that's a whole subject altogether. It's so sad that something like getting an education creates more hurdles and "rules", that are written in pencil, for us than anything.

And I totally agree that parents need to be present for their kids. Not just show up, cussing the teacher out over a bad grade when they haven't seen you for the rest of the school year. Ermm

A slow learning yt child gets resources, help and therapy while a black child of the same gets thrown into special ed, told to get meds, or held back a grade or two. The system wants to give us every disadvantage as possible to keep us right where they want us to be.....in our place. 





Edited by Az~Maverick - Nov 27 2013 at 6:51pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote ImThatDiva Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 7:15pm
Originally posted by tatee tatee wrote:


“Schools then started to adopt 'zero tolerance policies' along with drug sniffing dogs and metal detectors. Then came the 1990s, with the Drug Free School Zones Act which requires expulsion for carrying a gun on school grounds.  Zero tolerance policies are the kind of discipline that requires a particular kind of exclusion and it is a practice of harsh discipline.”


It wasn’t always like this.  Before and during part of the 1980s, kids engaged in many of the same behaviors that are the grounds for suspension and expulsion now.  Talking on a cell phone, having a food fight in the cafeteria, lateness, dress code violations,disrupting class----minor infractions that used to result in a trip to the principal’s office and maybe a few days of detention.  Now, these types of behaviors can result in criminal penalties, fines, and young people getting caught up in the criminal justice system with ramifications that can last a lifetime.


yeah umm, can't relate. I've never understood why it is such a problem to go to school  and abide by these rules. No cell phone?*locks phone in locker* No food fight(because they can possibly become dangerous)? *doesn't engage in food fight or initiate one* Don't be late for class?*doesn't dawdle in the halls between classes* Don't bring weapons or drugs?*doesn't own or use them anyway*

These are very simple rules-- no-- EXTREMELY simple rules to follow. If your teacher tells you to raise you hand in order to speak, don't open your mouth unless you've raised your hand and they've called on you. There's no need for excessive talking or rowdiness in class. What the hell are you in school for then?

Yes, I'm positive that administrators in schools--specifically in inner city schools-- do the most at times which needs to be rectified. However, I'm failing to see the problem with these rules or their punishment really. I've never once gotten in trouble for school for anything. I went there, did what I was told to do and sometimes above and beyond and went home. My dad and mom never received a call saying I was talking too much or I bought a weapon, I was disrespectful and/or etc. for my sisters or me.

Seriously, is it truly that hard to behave in school?

Edited by ImThatDiva - Nov 27 2013 at 8:59pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote ppp38 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 7:26pm
I'm tired of parents shifting the blame for their under performing kids. If your kids are going from school to prison- its not the fault of the system, its your fault for not being able to provide for your child emotionally or financially. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (5) Thanks(5)   Quote Printer_Ink Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 7:39pm
Sorry but I don't think this ois a White/Blackl problem. Black folks have got to stop blameing all their problems on White people instead of taking responsibilty for their own actions. I think the root of this problem is sexual irresponsibility.
 
If you get knocked before you are on your feet, through school, have a job and a husband .. then you set your kids and yourself up for a life of hardship and struggle. This is the path a lot of Black women make and then they to pretend it's all the fault of he White man that they are poor and struggling. Geesh!
 
So then you've  got to live in these bad areas and send your kids to the bad schools and then you expect the teachers to understand the community etc.
 
Sometimes that can work - but sometimes not.
 
It is the woman's responsibilty to either use some sort of birth control, (there are natural ones available), have an abortion or .. the common sense technique which is to not have sex. Duh. Don't be so loose.
 
Otherwise, you are just producing these innocent children into a world of deprivation which sets them up for the whole school to prison situation.
 
In the end .. it is not the school's responsibiy help you raise these childrem - never will be.


Edited by Printer_Ink - Nov 27 2013 at 7:45pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carolina cutie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2013 at 8:56pm
Originally posted by Az~Maverick Az~Maverick wrote:

Originally posted by Ladybird0724 Ladybird0724 wrote:

yes, the school/prison pipeline is real and thriving. what was that big city that just closed a bunch of schools but was building a 400M prison? Philly? I can't remember

and tbh I believe that it has (in part) something to do w/ the educators of the inner city schools.

inexperienced white teachers who know nothing about our culture and way of being, no understanding of our struggles are usually in inner city classrooms.

i don't remember if the article mentioned this, but also the large # of black children who are tested and considered "special ed" has something to do w/ it as well, but that is a whole other article.


this is why our community needs to hold education in a higher regard. parents need to be in the schools, on the PTA, volunteering in the classrooms and at the board mtgs advocating for our chilren. too many parents are not connected to their school. yes, schools can do better with making that connection, but so can parents.

This is why homeschooling, if able, should become more popular for our people. And let's not forget about the lack of cultural studies, that's a whole subject altogether. It's so sad that something like getting an education creates more hurdles and "rules", that are written in pencil, for us than anything.

And I totally agree that parents need to be present for their kids. Not just show up, cussing the teacher out over a bad grade when they haven't seen you for the rest of the school year. Ermm

A slow learning yt child gets resources, help and therapy while a black child of the same gets thrown into special ed, told to get meds, or held back a grade or two. The system wants to give us every disadvantage as possible to keep us right where they want us to be.....in our place. 
IA with all of this but especially the bolded.


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