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rising share of african americans are foreign born

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Topic: rising share of african americans are foreign born
Posted By: afrokock
Subject: rising share of african americans are foreign born
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 12:24pm


A record 3.8 million black immigrants live in the United States today, more than four times the number in 1980, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. Black immigrants now account for 8.7% of the nation’s black population, nearly triple their share in 1980.

Rapid growth in the black immigrant population is expected to continue. The Census Bureau projects that by 2060, 16.5% of U.S. blacks will be immigrants.1 In certain metropolitan areas, foreign-born blacks make up a significant share of the overall black population. For example, among the metropolitan areas with the largest black populations, roughly a third of blacks (34%) living in the Miami metro area are immigrants. In the New York metro area, that share is 28%. And in the Washington, D.C., area, it is 15%.

Jamaica, Haiti Largest Birth Countries for Black Immigrants in 2013Black immigrants are from many parts of the world, but half are from the Caribbean alone.2 Jamaica is the largest source country with about 682,000 black immigrants born there, accounting for 18% of the national total. Haiti follows with 586,000 black immigrants, making up 15% of the U.S. black immigrant population.

However, much of the recent growth in the size of the black immigrant population has been fueled by African immigration. Between 2000 and 2013, the number of black African immigrants living in the U.S. rose 137%, from 574,000 to 1.4 million. Africans now make up 36% of the total foreign-born black population, up from 24% in 2000 and just 7% in 1980.

Among black immigrants from Africa, virtually all are from sub-Saharan African countries, with only 1% of all black immigrants from North Africa. Nigeria, with 226,000 immigrants, and Ethiopia, with 191,000, are the two largest birth countries for black African immigrants to the U.S.

Black immigrants have roots in other parts of the world as well. Some 5% of all black immigrants are from South America and 4% are from Central America; those from Europe make up 2% of the population and those from South and East Asia make up 1%.3

Caribbean Is Top Birth Region; African Immigration Soared Since 2000Many black immigrants are from Spanish-speaking countries. Among these, the Dominican Republic is the largest country of birth, accounting for 166,000 black immigrants. Mexico is also a source of black immigration with roughly 70,000 black immigrants. Some 41,000 are from Cuba, and 32,000 are Panamanian. Moreover, 11% of the foreign-born black population identifies as Hispanic.

The History of Black Migration to the U.S.

The United States has long had a significant black population.4 In the nation’s earliest censuses (at the end of the 18th century), blacks accounted for nearly one-fifth of the U.S. population, with nearly all brought to the U.S. as slaves from Africa. Today, most of the nation’s 40 million U.S.-born blacks trace their roots to this population.

However, due to the outlawing of the slave trade in 1808 as well as restrictions on non-European immigration, the flow of blacks arriving in the U.S. dropped to a trickle for more than a century and a half. Among the black immigrants who voluntarily migrated during this time, most were from the Caribbean.

Close to a Third of Sub-Saharan African Immigrants Enter the U.S. as RefugeesThe modern wave of black immigration to the U.S. began when U.S. immigration policy changed in the 1960s, becoming more open to a wider variety of migrants. Just like other immigrants, foreign-born blacks benefited from the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that emphasized family reunification and skilled immigrant labor.5 In addition, the Refugee Act of 1980 loosened immigration restrictions by allowing more immigrants from conflict areas such as Ethiopia and Somalia to seek asylum in the U.S.6 Finally, the U.S. Immigration Act of 1990 sought to increase the number of immigrants from underrepresented nations, and although the act was initially intended to increase the flow of European immigrants, Africans have benefited from the program, as well.7

This act, also known as the diversity visa program, has been an important way for African immigrants to gain entry into the U.S. About one-in-five sub-Saharan African immigrants (19%) who gained legal permanent residence between 2000 and 2013 entered through this program.

During the same period, about three-in-ten (28%) sub-Saharan African immigrants arrived in the U.S. as refugees or asylees. That share was only 5% for Caribbean immigrants and 13% for the overall immigrant population. Caribbean immigrants are much more likely to enter the U.S. through family-sponsored

Caribbean and sub-Saharan African immigrants are less likely to have been granted admittance via employment-based visa programs than immigrants overall.8

A Statistical Portrait of Black Immigrants

How Black Immigrants Compare to Other Groups, 2013When compared with U.S.-born blacks, foreign-born blacks are older, with a median age of 42 years versus 29 years for U.S.-born blacks. Immigrant blacks ages 25 and older are also more likely than U.S.-born blacks to have a bachelor’s degree or more (26% versus 19%), less likely to live in poverty (20% versus 28%) and on average, have higher household incomes. They’re also much more likely to be married (48% among those ages 18 and older versus 28%) than U.S.-born blacks, which is likely tied to their higher median age.

Black immigrants share some similarities with the overall U.S. immigrant population in terms of their median ages and poverty rates. However, black immigrants are somewhat more likely to hold U.S. citizenship than all immigrants—54% versus 47%. Given that many black immigrants are from English-speaking Caribbean nations, they’re also more likely to be proficient in English compared with all immigrants (74% versus 50%). Black immigrants are also less likely to be in the U.S. illegally than all immigrants (16% versus 26%).

Compared with the U.S. population overall, black immigrants have a slightly higher median age (42 years versus 37 years) and among those that are ages 25 and up, are slightly less likely to have a college degree (26% versus 30%). In addition, black immigrants are less likely than all Americans to own their homes (40% versus 64%), and overall they have lower household incomes.

These findings are based on a Pew Research Center analysis of data from the 2013 American Community Survey in addition to analyses of the 1980, 1990 and 2000 U.S. decennial censuses. The report explores the characteristics of the nation’s black immigrant population in 2013 and how it has changed since 2000. It also compares the characteristics of black immigrants with those of U.S.-born blacks, all U.S. immigrants and the U.S. population.




Replies:
Posted By: afrokock
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 12:25pm
as always the sauce

http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2015/04/09/a-rising-share-of-the-u-s-black-population-is-foreign-born/" rel="nofollow - http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2015/04/09/a-rising-share-of-the-u-s-black-population-is-foreign-born/


Posted By: MizzAmirah
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 12:44pm
Even on BHM, you can see that. I knew Nigeria would be #1 for Africa, followed by Ethiopia. It's been like that for a while now. Nigerians no dey carry last. 


Posted By: mommykat
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 12:47pm
.


Posted By: bunzaveli
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 12:57pm
I can't hold back all these Haitian Brothas - rozay


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 1:04pm
oh.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 1:10pm
"In the New York metro area, that share is 28%."
^^^the diversity is the norm for me. Since this figure accounts for a very broad metro area, i really think that the percentage in my area and in Manhattan/Bronx/Brooklyn is much much higher, possibly 60% born overseas, 20% have been here for 2 generations and 20% have been here for centuries by way of the TransAtlantic Holocaust.
We all love, mix and get along fine so, my reaction to the article is just 'Oh'.


Posted By: Gkisses
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 1:21pm
Lot of Ethiopians and ppl from Cameroon here..ive been asked where im from a couple times and i feel like Ive failed them when i say Detroit.


Posted By: HaitianLuv
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 1:25pm
Originally posted by NJHairLuv NJHairLuv wrote:

"In the New York metro area, that share is 28%."
^^^the diversity is the norm for me. Since this figure accounts for a very broad metro area, i really think that the percentage in my area and in Manhattan/Bronx/Brooklyn is much much higher, possibly 60% born overseas, 20% have been here for 2 generations and 20% have been here for centuries by way of the TransAtlantic Holocaust.
We all love, mix and get along fine so, my reaction to the article is just 'Oh'.

The concentration is def higher in Brooklyn. Carribreans everywhere


Posted By: afrokock
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 3:20pm
Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

Lot of Ethiopians and ppl from Cameroon here..ive been asked where im from a couple times and i feel like Ive failed them when i say Detroit.
awww


Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 3:22pm
Gad damn yardies! always outshining everyone else. lolololol The brain drain is real folks reallllllllllll


Posted By: MizzAmirah
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 3:49pm
@Diane I think I read somewhere that Jamaica has a greater population in diaspora than actually Jamaica. Have you heard of that?


Posted By: afrokock
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 4:08pm
i believe that maybe true

if we account for descendants and such


Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 4:13pm
Originally posted by MizzAmirah MizzAmirah wrote:

@Diane I think I read somewhere that Jamaica has a greater population in diaspora than actually Jamaica. Have you heard of that?

yes, we do. If every yardie decided to return home we would have no space on the island or the sea to hold them all. it also has to do with the fact that once you can prove that a parent or grandparent is Jamaican then you can call yourself Jamaican and apply for citizenship even though you have never set foot on the island. so the numbers are inflated


Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 4:17pm
What makes a yardie a yardie? i think last census we were 2.5 million or so i assume that maybe another 300000 yardies are undocumented immigrants in the USA (assuming the data was only for US resident. citizens).  plenty of yardies in europe , even scattered all over the caribbean and latin america , it is said that any crabhole in the world you go there'll be 2-4 yardies living there are well. So yes more yardies live outside these 4400 square miles

ETA afro mentioned descendants- 1 adult male yardie is capable of making 4-6 babies a yearLOLLOLLOL


Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 4:58pm
Title is wrong because they're not AA. They're black. But this isn't news. I've heard AA tell me they feel like minorities within the black population in certain places, like on some college campuses.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 5:09pm
Originally posted by EPITOME EPITOME wrote:

Title is wrong because they're not AA. They're black. But this isn't news. I've heard AA tell me they feel like minorities within the black population in certain places


I agree with all of this^^^
I am the minority black on the average day in NJ & NYC. When I meet a person of the diaspora here, my assumption is that they are of foreign descent unless I have a reason to believe otherwise. I dont even bother to ask b/c it doesnt matter to me. We kinda have the 'American Melting Pot' thing going on here when it comes to people's origins here.


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 5:17pm
We need to get black numbers up

It's all good


Posted By: Yardgirl
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 7:15pm
Originally posted by HaitianLuv HaitianLuv wrote:

Originally posted by NJHairLuv NJHairLuv wrote:

"In the New York metro area, that share is 28%."
^^^the diversity is the norm for me. Since this figure accounts for a very broad metro area, i really think that the percentage in my area and in Manhattan/Bronx/Brooklyn is much much higher, possibly 60% born overseas, 20% have been here for 2 generations and 20% have been here for centuries by way of the TransAtlantic Holocaust.
We all love, mix and get along fine so, my reaction to the article is just 'Oh'.

The concentration is def higher in Brooklyn. Carribreans everywhere

Throw a stone in Brooklyn and you'll and hit a West Indian (or their offspring)


Posted By: AshBash89
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 7:51pm
Originally posted by EPITOME EPITOME wrote:

Title is wrong because they're not AA. They're black. But this isn't news. I've heard AA tell me they feel like minorities within the black population in certain places, like on some college campuses.


Glad you said


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 8:34pm
Yup epitome, My campus is filled with chidi's and Okwu's. Some who haven't been to Nigeria at all. JB's are the minority here especially for stem.


Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 8:40pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

Yup epitome, My campus is filled with chidi's and Okwu's. Some who haven't been to Nigeria at all. JB's are the minority here especially for stem.

Just Blacks?


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 8:43pm
Yep.


Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 8:47pm
at my school they called themselves "regula blacks" which is funny bc blacks in the US tend to be more mixed than nigerians or haitians lol...


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 8:56pm
Lol. I think it has a lot to do with culture, because at my school we have a certain culture where everyone either acts pg or Baltimore. So we all share that culture. But when the time comes, they'll bring out their african or Caribbean culture. So they have their american culture and something else added on. But JBs have only their american culture.


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 8:59pm
Like when you ask people where their from, they'll say I'm from pg but I'm originally from camaroon. They'll say both. But when I say I'm from moco I get an.. "Oh.." Because People are expecting me to say Nigeria or Dominican republic or something. Also because no one fuccs with moco.. But I digress :(


Posted By: MizzAmirah
Date Posted: Apr 20 2015 at 10:43pm
Well, when I'm asked, I say I'm Nigerian-American. It depends on who's asking. I could also say I'm Nigerian. But during conversation if more is asked, I say I was born and raised here. I'm from PG too. But I only say that to people outside PG (e.g. Bmore folks) and I just say my state for everyone else and KIM. Having dual cultures is complicated if you wantit to be. 


Posted By: afrokock
Date Posted: Apr 21 2015 at 3:03am
Originally posted by AshBash89 AshBash89 wrote:

Originally posted by EPITOME EPITOME wrote:

Title is wrong because they're not AA. They're black. But this isn't news. I've heard AA tell me they feel like minorities within the black population in certain places, like on some college campuses.


Glad you said
Till the cops come knocking then you're just described as African American

It still fits ..

But yeah I worded it that way intentionally ..


Posted By: nitabug
Date Posted: Apr 21 2015 at 3:11am
I never have a problem with the aa title


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: Apr 21 2015 at 3:14am
Me too. I feel like at this point in my life, being JB makes me very unique/different.


Posted By: MizzAmirah
Date Posted: Apr 21 2015 at 11:38am
At the end of the day, no1curr.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 22 2015 at 11:44pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

Me too. I feel like at this point in my life, being JB makes me very unique/different.

werent you communicating in aytian kreyol the other day? you're not of haitian origin?



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