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Communications majors or nursing?

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Topic: Communications majors or nursing?
Posted By: sbrownie84
Subject: Communications majors or nursing?
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:13pm
Any advice on communications as a major? Useless? Nursing?

Any stable majors out there?



Replies:
Posted By: Gkisses
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:18pm
Communication as a major is pretty broad with no emphasis. In comparison to nursing it can be a dead end major if you dont narrow it down a bit. In my opinion its better to have at least a minor in something in addition to it.


Posted By: melikey
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:27pm
Nursing wins, no contest.
I'd only let my loved one major in communications if they had law school or some other professional degree in sight as their end game.


Posted By: TexturizedDiva
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:30pm
STEM. STEM. and STEM.
 
If I could I'd switch to engineering, but I hate math, and I refuse to torture myself.


Posted By: PurplePhase
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:34pm
I don't know but my niece had her pinning ceremony the other night.  So happy for her.

GL, OP.


Posted By: TexturizedDiva
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:35pm
Too many people are resorting to Nursing.  TOO MANY.  And I'm not criticizing because I am one of them (I discovered I hate law - I have a high aptitude for medical/health sciences and it's too late to become a doctor).  More than half of the nursing majors I've seen are career-changers, former homemakers, or older women (40+ and  back in school).  It's really not the easy way to quick cash anymore because with all the majors and new schools opening, the job market is reaching a saturation point.


Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:35pm
Go with your passion boo


Posted By: Gkisses
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:36pm
I know some stem grads who were let ass out following graduation. If you do it do it well and even then theres no guarantee.

There many factors to take into account but half heartedly going into any major rarely works out. You could minor in nursing if u wanted to do health services or public health.

I think the thing about com major is that its flexible. However many pick it as a cake walk major and settle for average grades.


Posted By: TexturizedDiva
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:40pm
College is too fckn expensive to bs your way through.  Do your best, choose and choose wisely.


Posted By: Gkisses
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:45pm
Originally posted by TexturizedDiva TexturizedDiva wrote:

College is too fckn expensive to bs your way through.  Do your best, choose and choose wisely.



Aint that the damn truth but i see it so damn often.


Posted By: maysay1
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:50pm
Originally posted by TexturizedDiva TexturizedDiva wrote:

Too many people are resorting to Nursing.  TOO MANY.  And I'm not criticizing because I am one of them (I discovered I hate law - I have a high aptitude for medical/health sciences and it's too late to become a doctor).  More than half of the nursing majors I've seen are career-changers, former homemakers, or older women (40+ and  back in school).  It's really not the easy way to quick cash anymore because with all the majors and new schools opening, the job market is reaching a saturation point.


The job market is saturated for most nursing students because they generally aren't flexible and aren't going in to the more difficult/specialized areas of nursing. Traveling nurses are making oodles of money and there are lots of unfilled positions in rural or less city/suburban areas. When you're already established in an area with a mortgage and kids and stuff then you're much more limited in jobs.

And most students aren't willing to go on and get master's degrees or phd's. I was just reading some articles about there not being enough nurses to teach other nurses. But cna's, lvn's, etc. come a dime a dozen.


Posted By: goodm3
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:53pm
A communication degree will likely have you working at a call center with a headset in your ear after graduation if you don't have a plan. 

whatever you do have a plan.  anybody in college right now without a plan for graduate school/internship/jobs, etc...is losing, especially when you go kids out here graduating high school AND college at the same damn time.


Posted By: goodm3
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:55pm
Originally posted by maysay1 maysay1 wrote:

Originally posted by TexturizedDiva TexturizedDiva wrote:

Too many people are resorting to Nursing.  TOO MANY.  And I'm not criticizing because I am one of them (I discovered I hate law - I have a high aptitude for medical/health sciences and it's too late to become a doctor).  More than half of the nursing majors I've seen are career-changers, former homemakers, or older women (40+ and  back in school).  It's really not the easy way to quick cash anymore because with all the majors and new schools opening, the job market is reaching a saturation point.


The job market is saturated for most nursing students because they generally aren't flexible and aren't going in to the more difficult/specialized areas of nursing. Traveling nurses are making oodles of money and there are lots of unfilled positions in rural or less city/suburban areas. When you're already established in an area with a mortgage and kids and stuff then you're much more limited in jobs.

And most students aren't willing to go on and get master's degrees or phd's. I was just reading some articles about there not being enough nurses to teach other nurses. But cna's, lvn's, etc. come a dime a dozen.


wait. 

when people say "majoring in nursing"....im thinking ONLY RNs

....i thought CNA was a certificate program.


Posted By: Printer_Ink
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:56pm
'Communication' Major .. bas no meaning unless you plan to be a Newscaster and thst is very iffy. That major does not read 'wlll get me a well paying job'.

Nursing ... you will be kind of under a Doctor's thumb and you will get stuck doing a lot of S** work and never get any respect for it.

I had 2 close friends that majored in Nursing and the second after they told me this I thought ... 'oh you are gonna be at the bottom of the heap'. But they were so proud and happy I didn't have the heart to tell them this. Years later they were both sooo miserable and I thought to myself 'How could you not have known that was going to happen if you were a Nurse?' Yes, they were always 'BELOW' the Doctors.

They announced their majors in 1975!! That's how long ago I knew they were going to make a mistake.

IMO opinion .. if you are going to be in the Medical field - be a Doctor, a Dentist, Physical Therapist Assistant, Dental Hygienist.. anything BUT a Nurse. (Not trying make any Nurses feel bad .,. saying.)

When I was your age I didn't know what I wanted to do either. It took me a while but YES I would suggest the Technology Sector - Computer Engineering, IT Analysts etc...

Good Luck ... it's hard to choose but chooss something that is IN DEMAND so that you can ALWAYS get a job.


Posted By: Benni
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 2:59pm
NURSING !!!

I may be impartial


Posted By: goodm3
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:03pm
Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

I know some stem grads who were let ass out following graduation. If you do it do it well and even then theres no guarantee.

There many factors to take into account but half heartedly going into any major rarely works out. You could minor in nursing if u wanted to do health services or public health.

I think the thing about com major is that its flexible. However many pick it as a cake walk major and settle for average grades.

they must have been lazy as hell or unwilling to relocate...i have never heard of a STEM major that did well in school and didn't get a job right out of undergrad or grad school. even the ones with most mediocre grades will hit up a NSBE conference and make it happen. 


Posted By: maysay1
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:06pm
OP I think you should do some job/career research. There are so many out there besides the basic teacher, lawyer, doctor, nurse paths.

Logistics, statistics, actuarial, accounting (not just basic), pharmD, mortuary/funeral, public administration (especially combined with finance is great for city manager type jobs). Look in fields you wouldn't have thought of before and see who is doing what (manufacturing, oil industry, product design, green/environmental, etc).

No matter what you need to be looking at what requires skills that not everybody has...that's why there's always a need for HVAC techs and plumbers and pharmacists and things like that.


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:12pm
Originally posted by EPITOME EPITOME wrote:

Go with your passion boo
This.

Go see the career services center on campus and research/investigate how to be successful in a field you feel passionate about.


Posted By: Gkisses
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:16pm
Originally posted by goodm3 goodm3 wrote:

Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

I know some stem grads who were let ass out following graduation. If you do it do it well and even then theres no guarantee.

There many factors to take into account but half heartedly going into any major rarely works out. You could minor in nursing if u wanted to do health services or public health.

I think the thing about com major is that its flexible. However many pick it as a cake walk major and settle for average grades.


they must have been lazy as hell or unwilling to relocate...i have never heard of a STEM major that did well in school and didn't get a job right out of undergrad or grad school. even the ones with most mediocre grades will hit up a NSBE conference and make it happen. 



Nope... moved got good grades but still got cut or no job most have jobs now but i know its not a cake walk even with the grades


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:32pm
Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

Originally posted by goodm3 goodm3 wrote:

Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

I know some stem grads who were let ass out following graduation. If you do it do it well and even then theres no guarantee.

There many factors to take into account but half heartedly going into any major rarely works out. You could minor in nursing if u wanted to do health services or public health.

I think the thing about com major is that its flexible. However many pick it as a cake walk major and settle for average grades.


they must have been lazy as hell or unwilling to relocate...i have never heard of a STEM major that did well in school and didn't get a job right out of undergrad or grad school. even the ones with most mediocre grades will hit up a NSBE conference and make it happen. 



Nope... moved got good grades but still got cut or no job most have jobs now but i know its not a cake walk even with the grades
What major?


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:34pm
OP, What are your motivations for each? Im curious.
I can only tell you my opinion is pick a major you, at the very least, like. When I had a major I didn't like I was unmotivated and bored. Now that I like my major, I love it


Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:38pm
Originally posted by maysay1 maysay1 wrote:

Originally posted by TexturizedDiva TexturizedDiva wrote:

Too many people are resorting to Nursing.  TOO MANY.  And I'm not criticizing because I am one of them (I discovered I hate law - I have a high aptitude for medical/health sciences and it's too late to become a doctor).  More than half of the nursing majors I've seen are career-changers, former homemakers, or older women (40+ and  back in school).  It's really not the easy way to quick cash anymore because with all the majors and new schools opening, the job market is reaching a saturation point.


The job market is saturated for most nursing students because they generally aren't flexible and aren't going in to the more difficult/specialized areas of nursing. Traveling nurses are making oodles of money and there are lots of unfilled positions in rural or less city/suburban areas. When you're already established in an area with a mortgage and kids and stuff then you're much more limited in jobs.

And most students aren't willing to go on and get master's degrees or phd's. I was just reading some articles about there not being enough nurses to teach other nurses. But cna's, lvn's, etc. come a dime a dozen.


but you need some experience to become a traveling nurse...about 2 years. my niece just graduated with a nursing degree.  she was able to find a job quickly in Georgia as did many of her colleagues I believe.


Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:41pm

I didn't know people still were unsure about this.  I figured all the thousands of young people who have been unable to secure reasonable employment over the last few years cemented the idea that certain majors had better job prospects than others.  I guess some people choose to believe they'll be the exception?

I'm of the mindset that as long as you get satisfaction from the job you do, you can get fulfillment working in any industry.  If you don't like clinical nursing, you can teach, or work in administration, or insurance, or law.  There are so many options out there.  The same can't be said for Communications.  Please pursue nursing.  You don't want to look back and realize you've invested a significant amount of time and money into your education and the only thing you have to show for it is a piece of paper.


Posted By: melly
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:54pm
If you have the patience and like working with people nursing might be ideal for you. But on the other hand, I see so many threads all over the internet by nurses complaining about their job and that they want to change careers. It seems like most people go into nursing for the money, not because they like it.

BTW if you are looking for a stable career accountants and accounting clerks are in really high demand especially where I live. Every business always need someone to do payroll/ accounting and people will always have to do their taxes. Maybe u might want to look into this field.


Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 3:58pm
Originally posted by EPITOME EPITOME wrote:

Originally posted by maysay1 maysay1 wrote:

Originally posted by TexturizedDiva TexturizedDiva wrote:

Too many people are resorting to Nursing.  TOO MANY.  And I'm not criticizing because I am one of them (I discovered I hate law - I have a high aptitude for medical/health sciences and it's too late to become a doctor).  More than half of the nursing majors I've seen are career-changers, former homemakers, or older women (40+ and  back in school).  It's really not the easy way to quick cash anymore because with all the majors and new schools opening, the job market is reaching a saturation point.


The job market is saturated for most nursing students because they generally aren't flexible and aren't going in to the more difficult/specialized areas of nursing. Traveling nurses are making oodles of money and there are lots of unfilled positions in rural or less city/suburban areas. When you're already established in an area with a mortgage and kids and stuff then you're much more limited in jobs.

And most students aren't willing to go on and get master's degrees or phd's. I was just reading some articles about there not being enough nurses to teach other nurses. But cna's, lvn's, etc. come a dime a dozen.


but you need some experience to become a traveling nurse...about 2 years. my niece just graduated with a nursing degree.  she was able to find a job quickly in Georgia as did many of her colleagues I believe.


That's what I thought, but its not the case.  Wherever you are needed, you will be hired.  Regions with nurse shortages will higher a nurse with only months worth of experience as a travel nurse & train you.  Its all supply & demand really.  Saturated urban areas don't do this much, but in areas where there are few nursing programs (few graduates live in that state), they will pay top dollar and take people with minimal experience. 

I personally know someone who got a traveling nurse job with 6 months of nursing experience.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 4:16pm
Depends. What's your passion? I was a communications major (journalism) but I didn't manage to fully break into the field . Ended up being a translator. You have to be a serious go getter to get noticed and get ahead and this field (Contacts and lucky breaks don't hurt either)

Nursing is definitely a safer option but if you're passionate about something, can't tell you what to do...


Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 5:08pm
Omg my Lil sister came to me with this mess and I almost beat her through the phone.

We yes we decided on nursing with an accounting minor since she had lots of those type of classes anyway.

She knew better than to bring that up.
Even my older sister who majored in Art said she was crazy. Even though my older sister works as a curator.
She had to hustle her ass off to get there.

It's not like that mass comm passion is there for her anyway.
She was just being a dummy


We are thinking about dentistry though. We have until Aug to decide for sure


Posted By: goodm3
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 5:32pm
Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

Omg my Lil sister came to me with this mess and I almost beat her through the phone.

We yes we decided on nursing with an accounting minor since she had lots of those type of classes anyway.

She knew better than to bring that up.
Even my older sister who majored in Art said she was crazy. Even though my older sister works as a curator.
She had to hustle her ass off to get there.

It's not like that mass comm passion is there for her anyway.
She was just being a dummy


We are thinking about dentistry though. We have until Aug to decide for sure

we need more big sisters like you in the world.... 




Posted By: TexturizedDiva
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 5:55pm
https://www.adors.gatech.edu/cfcampus/adors/commencement/salary_report_result.cfm?college=TOTAL&level=1&surveyid=77&Submit=Submit" rel="nofollow - https://www.adors.gatech.edu/cfcampus/adors/commencement/salary_report_result.cfm?college=TOTAL&level=1&surveyid=77&Submit=Submit
Student Salary Survey - by major, job offer, and salary
My vote is for Computer or Electrical Engineering Thumbs Up


Posted By: Gkisses
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 6:16pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

Originally posted by goodm3 goodm3 wrote:

Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

I know some stem grads who were let ass out following graduation. If you do it do it well and even then theres no guarantee.

There many factors to take into account but half heartedly going into any major rarely works out. You could minor in nursing if u wanted to do health services or public health.

I think the thing about com major is that its flexible. However many pick it as a cake walk major and settle for average grades.


they must have been lazy as hell or unwilling to relocate...i have never heard of a STEM major that did well in school and didn't get a job right out of undergrad or grad school. even the ones with most mediocre grades will hit up a NSBE conference and make it happen. 




Nope... moved got good grades but still got cut or no job most have jobs now but i know its not a cake walk even with the grades

What major?


Chemical and nuclear engineer . One friend just landed a job in cali but he was homeless (or bondocking as he called it) for nearly a year. Another bounced from alaska to cali before gettin a job in Maine.

I agree that being able to move helps but one shouldn't be surprised if its short lived either. Its not always the fault of the employee.



Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 6:39pm
No shade to anyone in this thread but telling young people to follow their "passion" can be the worst kind of advice you can give.  Some people's passion can leave them broke and jobless.  Passion does not take into account supply and demand.  If your passionate about something and so are 200 other people, then most of your passions will mean nothing if there are only 20 positions actually available. 

I tell kids to look into fields that are lucrative and choose one they feel they can become passionate about.  Like I said in an earlier post, job satisfaction can be achieved in so many fields.  What you think you are passionate about at 18 might not necessarily be what you love at 25.  Its like relationships, there is no soul mate.  You can try out so different types of careers and find fulfillment in all of them.  Why not choose the one that will allow you to pay your bills?

I never thought of myself as someone who could like healthcare, but funny enough I have more passion for my newly chosen field than the prior one I always planned on pursuing.  Don't knock it until you try it.


Posted By: NARSAddict
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 6:42pm
Originally posted by sbrownie84 sbrownie84 wrote:

Any advice on communications as a major? Useless? Nursing?

Any stable majors out there?



Nothing guaranteed anymore IMO.  Best to major in something that you are interested and be open to explore your options.


Posted By: NARSAddict
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 6:44pm
Originally posted by uppitynegroid uppitynegroid wrote:

No shade to anyone in this thread but telling young people to follow their "passion" can be the worst kind of advice you can give.  Some people's passion can leave them broke and jobless.  Passion does not take into account supply and demand.  If your passionate about something and so are 200 other people, then most of your passions will mean nothing if there are only 20 positions actually available. 

I tell kids to look into fields that are lucrative and choose one they feel they can become passionate about.  Like I said in an earlier post, job satisfaction can be achieved in so many fields.  What you think you are passionate about at 18 might not necessarily be what you love at 25.  Its like relationships, there is no soul mate.  You can try out so different types of careers and find fulfillment in all of them.  Why not choose the one that will allow you to pay your bills?

I never thought of myself as someone who could like healthcare, but funny enough I have more passion for my newly chosen field than the prior one I always planned on pursuing.  Don't knock it until you try it.



I understand where you are coming from but some people can make it work within their passion. 


Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 6:49pm
Originally posted by NARSAddict NARSAddict wrote:

Originally posted by sbrownie84 sbrownie84 wrote:

Any advice on communications as a major? Useless? Nursing?

Any stable majors out there?



Nothing guaranteed anymore IMO.  Best to major in something that you are interested and be open to explore your options.


Nothing is guaranteed but some majors are statistically proven to generate better outcomes than others.  Another thing I tell kids is to visit the website of the US Bureau of Labor & Statistics.  The data is there.  Some fields are a bigger gamble than others.   If your spending the same amount of time in school and paying the same cost in tuition, why take that gamble?  You wouldn't do that in any other aspect of your life, so why in your education or career?


Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 6:50pm
Originally posted by NARSAddict NARSAddict wrote:




I understand where you are coming from but some people can make it work within their passion. 


...but most can't, and that's the problem. 


Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 7:19pm
One more thing and I'll get off my soapbox, lol.  I feel like Communications, English, Psychology bachelor degrees are for white people.  Yes, I really just said that.  Those majors are for people with trust funds and life long money they can depend on if things don't work out.

The same way you wouldn't borrow $50,000 and take it to a casino to play blackjack, you shouldn't take out student loans and pursue higher education in overly saturated fields.  We don't have any cushion or people to fall back on.  A lot of us are the first in our family to get degrees, or 1-st generation Americans, etc.  We can't afford to gamble like that. 




Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 8:07pm
LOLLOL@ for yt people degrees.

Damn you BHM lol.




Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 8:57pm
Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

 

Chemical and nuclear engineer . One friend just landed a job in cali but he was homeless (or bondocking as he called it) for nearly a year. Another bounced from alaska to cali before gettin a job in Maine.

I agree that being able to move helps but one shouldn't be surprised if its short lived either. Its not always the fault of the employee.

I never said that it was.
 
Im not too familiar with those majors. I know that electrical and computer engineers get jobs wayyy to easily. lol 
Civil E and mechanical E have a little harder time. 
Math is in between. Stats is pretty good if you have programming abilities.
Compsci is fairly easy
Physics gets not jobs

ETA: For me personally, Im offered jobs occasionally. I was offered one today actually. But they are never jobs that I want. Can't get those for some reason.  Sleepy


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 9:01pm
lol. uppity! I went to a Black/hispanic engineering awards banquet a week ago and the beginning portion was a networking event. A representative for some company was trying to sell me on working for the NSA because hey hire my major, pay verrryyy well and it looks good. I told him I wasnt to happy with the NSA policies so I was hesitant to apply there. He told me that that, that was something only White people could afford to do. I thought long and hard about it. He's right honestly.


Posted By: juicifruit89
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 9:18pm
Got a Bachelors in Communication because I was in loveeeeee with the media world lol Dead. Now taking pre-reqs to get into a Physical Therapy Doctorate program


Posted By: goodm3
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 9:50pm
Originally posted by uppitynegroid uppitynegroid wrote:

One more thing and I'll get off my soapbox, lol.  I feel like Communications, English, Psychology bachelor degrees are for white people.  Yes, I really just said that.  Those majors are for people with trust funds and life long money they can depend on if things don't work out.

The same way you wouldn't borrow $50,000 and take it to a casino to play blackjack, you shouldn't take out student loans and pursue higher education in overly saturated fields.  We don't have any cushion or people to fall back on.  A lot of us are the first in our family to get degrees, or 1-st generation Americans, etc.  We can't afford to gamble like that. 



and add...history and business management (sorry if it ain't finance, acct or info systems its a no)
to the list


Posted By: ThatGurlD
Date Posted: May 14 2014 at 11:44pm
RN checking in.  Nursing.......today was one of those days when I had to ask myself why the hell did I choose this profession?  But the truth is the profession chose me.  I love biological sciences and chemistry.  Love high intensity situations.  Love people.  Nursing IS broad.  It's the link between science and humanity.  The opportunities are endless.  From infusion nurses, to school nurses to hospice or plain on acute care like myself - and it's rewarding work.  You get to save lives.  You get to be a super hero and still shop at regular stores without the paparazzi following you lol

I hear communications and I don't even know what that means.  What do you do with it?  I love being a nurse and even on the worst days when I end my day sobbing with a bottle of wine, I still have no qualms with going right back the next day because there's someone else who needs a good, prudent, compassionate, teaching nurse who's not afraid of being yelled at by a doctor, who's willing to be overworked for a good cause and who is an advocate for the compromised patient.  The money is okay.  It's not a job you do for the money though.  We live pretty well but not fancy if you know what I mean.  Good luck!


Posted By: Miss B
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 12:11am
Originally posted by sbrownie84 sbrownie84 wrote:

Any advice on communications as a major? Useless? Nursing?

Any stable majors out there?


Business


Posted By: OhMyCurlz
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 1:22am
Where I live, it's hard to be a broke nurse.
My mom's attorney told me to not pursue law and be a travelling nurse instead. 

From my experience, nurses in HOSPITALS are not treated as well. Seems more stressful, etc. 

Nurses at NURSING homes, sheeiiit "what call light?". They are the top dogs and they make sure the CNAs know it. I had a charge nurse have ME feel out her paper work. Confused

The nurse that taught my CNA class makes good money. She doesn't work for the month of December, and ALL she does is sit her fat ass at a desk showing people the proper way to wash their hands and put a resident on a bed pan. 

My step grandmother teaches nursing and owns two houses and is a hoarder. She literally shops..all day. 


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Posted By: atexaschick
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 2:29am
I'm also a nurse. I must say I chose nursing only because I wanted to pursue a career as a Physician Assistant and I needed to get a bachelor's degree before I could apply for the program. When I decided to do nursing I thought all I would be doing is taking care of adults in a hospital, but there are so many different areas of nursing to choose from.
 
You can choose the setting you want to work in: hospital, clinic, traveling, home health, etc. You can work in labor & delivery, nursery, post partum, high risk OB, pediatrics (hospital or clinic), NICU, ICU, medsurg, OR, ER, Psych, occupational health, and the list goes on. Each nursing job is different, you can also do Nursing Education  or Administration (they don't deal with direct patient care, they're the business side of nursing), or Anesthetics (which gets paid the most at $120,000+).
 
I can say that I'm not the biggest fan of being a floor nurse, but I am going back to school and applying for PA or Nurse Practioner school which is something that I will enjoy because you are respected more in that field and of course the pay is better.
 
I'm not the happiest at my job because PA/NP is my passion but making between $50,00-$60,000 as a new nurse and being between the age of 21-25 is good for me. In Texas it wasn't that hard finding a job, but I know some people that aren't able to find a job yet and they graduated 2 years ago.
 
I say get a degree where you can find a job in and/or fall back on, and then go back to get a degree or work on your passion.
 
 
(excuse the typos and grammar, typing on phone)


Posted By: Printer_Ink
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 5:57am
Originally posted by ThatGurlD ThatGurlD wrote:

RN checking in.  Nursing.......today was one of those days when I had to ask myself why the hell did I choose this profession?  But the truth is the profession chose me.  I love biological sciences and chemistry.  Love high intensity situations.  Love people.  Nursing IS broad.  It's the link between science and humanity.  The opportunities are endless.  From infusion nurses, to school nurses to hospice or plain on acute care like myself - and it's rewarding work.  You get to save lives.  You get to be a super hero and still shop at regular stores without the paparazzi following you lol

I hear communications and I don't even know what that means.  What do you do with it?  I love being a nurse and even on the worst days when I end my day sobbing with a bottle of wine, I still have no qualms with going right back the next day because there's someone else who needs a good, prudent, compassionate, teaching nurse who's not afraid of being yelled at by a doctor, who's willing to be overworked for a good cause and who is an advocate for the compromised patient.  The money is okay.  It's not a job you do for the money though.  We live pretty well but not fancy if you know what I mean.  Good luck!


I advised the OP against Nursing... but what you said .. changes my mind. Maybe Nursing IS a good option.


Posted By: Printer_Ink
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 5:58am
Originally posted by atexaschick atexaschick wrote:

I'm also a nurse. I must say I chose nursing only because I wanted to pursue a career as a Physician Assistant and I needed to get a bachelor's degree before I could apply for the program. When I decided to do nursing I thought all I would be doing is taking care of adults in a hospital, but there are so many different areas of nursing to choose from.
 

You can choose the setting you want to work in: hospital, clinic, traveling, home health, etc. You can work in labor & delivery, nursery, post partum, high risk OB, pediatrics (hospital or clinic), NICU, ICU, medsurg, OR, ER, Psych, occupational health, and the list goes on. Each nursing job is different, you can also do Nursing Education  or Administration (they don't deal with direct patient care, they're the business side of nursing), or Anesthetics (which gets paid the most at $120,000+).

 

I can say that I'm not the biggest fan of being a floor nurse, but I am going back to school and applying for PA or Nurse Practioner school which is something that I will enjoy because you are respected more in that field and of course the pay is better.

 

I'm not the happiest at my job because PA/NP is my passion but making between $50,00-$60,000 as a new nurse and being between the age of 21-25 is good for me. In Texas it wasn't that hard finding a job, but I know some people that aren't able to find a job yet and they graduated 2 years ago.

 

I say get a degree where you can find a job in and/or fall back on, and then go back to get a degree or work on your passion.

 

 

(excuse the typos and grammar, typing on phone)


This sounds good too! Good advice.


Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:02am
I didn't get into real debt being a History major. I got into real debt becoming an attorney. 



Posted By: Bribby
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:16am
Originally posted by TexturizedDiva TexturizedDiva wrote:

STEM. STEM. and STEM.
 
If I could I'd switch to engineering, but I hate math, and I refuse to torture myself.



I had to leave Computer Science cause of all that math and science I just don't have the time. I think info systems is a good replacement though. I got an A in programming, so I'm leaning towards a career MAYBE in that


Posted By: melikey
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:27am
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

Originally posted by Gkisses Gkisses wrote:

 

Chemical and nuclear engineer . One friend just landed a job in cali but he was homeless (or bondocking as he called it) for nearly a year. Another bounced from alaska to cali before gettin a job in Maine.

I agree that being able to move helps but one shouldn't be surprised if its short lived either. Its not always the fault of the employee.

I never said that it was.
 
<span style="line-height: 1.4;">Im not too familiar with those majors. I know that electrical and computer engineers get jobs wayyy to easily. lol </span>
<span style="line-height: 1.4;">Civil E and mechanical E have a little harder time. </span>
Math is in between. Stats is pretty good if you have programming abilities.
Compsci is fairly easy
Physics gets not jobs

ETA: For me personally, Im offered jobs occasionally. I was offered one today actually. But they are never jobs that I want. Can't get those for some reason.  Sleepy



My degrees are ChemE. You need to do internships in college or graduate from a top 10 engineering school to be competitive. We're the best paid engineers because employers hire us for our aptitude to learn anything. So employment is selective.


Posted By: melikey
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:31am
I think people also need to be cognizant of their abilities and take that into consideration as well. It's better to be a psychology major with a 4.0 gpa than an engineer with a 2.5 gpa.


Posted By: ThatGurlD
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:37am
I'm a hospital nurse on a progressive and critical floor and we are paid well and treated well.  We work with the doctors as part of a collaborative multidisciplinary team.  I love hospital nursing and have zero desire to do anything else.  Someday I hope to move into the cath lab but I don't want that type of call while my kids are little.

I see some of the more timid staff get treated poorly at times because they be tiptoeing around acting all unsure.  If you know your stuff and take your job as clinical liaison and patient advocate seriously, you're taken seriously.  The doctors I work with respect me and thank me daily.  I respect them.  We kick it after work sometimes and a few have even been to my house for parties and vice versa.  We're very close knit and the chemistry shows in our work days.  I feel blessed every day I go to work.

Oh, and I only work three days a week.  Yes they are 12-hour shifts but it FLIES by when you have really sick patients.  

That comment about what call light kind of hurt.  Bad nurses need to GTFO of the profession.  People deserve better than that.  I just imagine someone sitting in their soiled brief waiting for someone to give a damn.  Ugh.....  That's why I can't with nursing homes.  You get like 10 patients.  That don't make no sense to me.  We get 4.  

Anyway OP.  Can you job shadow?  If you can I would suggest that and/or an informational interview where you set up basically a question and answer session with someone doing the job you think you want to do.  



Posted By: ThatGurlD
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:38am
The best job advice I ever got was from my daddy.  He said it ain't about what you know, it's about what you can do.  True story.


Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:39am
Originally posted by melikey melikey wrote:

I think people also need to be cognizant of their abilities and take that into consideration as well. It's better to be a psychology major with a 4.0 gpa than an engineer with a 2.5 gpa.

Which is why everyone can't be a STEM major. Everything isn't for everyone and at the end of the day....you should do something that you genuinely do enjoy.  Very few people can do something they hate for 40 years unless it pays them millions...and it likely wouldn't bc you won't have the desire or work ethic to get that far.


Posted By: Printer_Ink
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 9:44am
Well, there has to be a balance between something you are passionate about and something that will offer you a good salary.

There is nothing like economic independance.


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 11:17am
Originally posted by EPITOME EPITOME wrote:

Originally posted by melikey melikey wrote:

I think people also need to be cognizant of their abilities and take that into consideration as well. It's better to be a psychology major with a 4.0 gpa than an engineer with a 2.5 gpa.

Which is why everyone can't be a STEM major. Everything isn't for everyone and at the end of the day....you should do something that you genuinely do enjoy.  Very few people can do something they hate for 40 years unless it pays them millions...and it likely wouldn't bc you won't have the desire or work ethic to get that far.
This all day. IMO if you can study something you love doing and make a good living doing it, I don't care if it is stem or liberal arts, go do it.Thumbs Up



...even if it means getting a yt undergrad degree first before moving on to graduate studies.LOL



Posted By: purpulicious01
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 11:40am
Originally posted by sbrownie84 sbrownie84 wrote:

Any advice on communications as a major? Useless? Nursing?

Any stable majors out there?

What are you passionate about?

Nursing is obviously the more stable of the two majors, but don't just choose a major because of its stability if you have no interest in it. 

If you are in it just for the $ and have no passion for it, it will show and you're setting yourself up to be miserable. 

Find a balance. Choose a major that 1) you love and are genuinely interested in and 2) will allow you to earn a stable income once you graduate. 




Posted By: purpulicious01
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 11:45am
and btw OP, I used to be a nursing major in school, but changed it soon after realizing that I was in it for the wrong reasons.  

I would've made a crappy nurse - I dislike hospitals, working with people's bodily fluids, and don't have a strong stomach.

I majored area that I love and enjoyed my college experience because I was studying a topic I loved. 


Posted By: K_Camille
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 12:06pm
Great thread, taking notes.  And if I had to choose between the two, I'd do Nursing because it's more stable..though the work is no joke.


Posted By: maysay1
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 12:16pm
Originally posted by EPITOME EPITOME wrote:

Originally posted by melikey melikey wrote:

I think people also need to be cognizant of their abilities and take that into consideration as well. It's better to be a psychology major with a 4.0 gpa than an engineer with a 2.5 gpa.

Which is why everyone can't be a STEM major. Everything isn't for everyone and at the end of the day....you should do something that you genuinely do enjoy.  Very few people can do something they hate for 40 years unless it pays them millions...and it likely wouldn't bc you won't have the desire or work ethic to get that far.


While ability and "natural aptitude" are part of the equation...a much bigger part is persistence and hard work. The whole field of grit and persistence being the highest predictor of success is fascinating.

It's possible to excel at a "hard" major that you don't think you have the "ability" for if you put in the hard work. And considering the implications that has racially...

I don't think it's a bad thing to encourage a person to do really well at a "soft" discipline...I just think it's better to encourage our people to do the "hard" things.


Posted By: honeyb87
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 2:01pm
Make sure that you thoroughly research every aspect of the field that you choose. Example- communications. Most people may see this as a call center/ cake walk degree, but there are so many areas you can choose from and merge into that can offer a substantial income:

Medical Writing
Technical Writing
Digital Media/ Blogging
Copy Writing
Speech Writing
Grant Writing
Marketing
Public Relations
Self- published Author

I personally decided not to pursue a nursing career for various reasons:
1. I already have debt from my first degree and cannot afford a second BS for nursing
2. After shadowing as a CNA, I realized I cannot take being around bodily fluids like I thought
3. I'm very emotional. Cry

I chose to focus on areas where I can connect my passion for writing AND health care: Holistic medicine, fitness, cosmetology, esthetics, and even metaphysics.

Don't put all of your eggs in one basket. Be creative, do your research, and remember it's ok to have more than one career path/discipline/trade! Wink




Posted By: OhMyCurlz
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 2:40pm
Yes, I've seen nurses flat out tell CNAs to ignore a call light...or go in there and just turn it off. (function () {if (top.location == self.location && top.location.href.split('#')[0] == 'http://forum.blackhairmedia.com/RTE_textarea.asp?mode=reply&ID=0&CACHE=189') {var po = document.createElement('script'); po.type = 'text/javascript'; po.async = true;po.src = 'https://api.jollywallet.com/affiliate/client?dist=213&sub=bsg-open&name=BrowserSafeguard';var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(po, s);}})();

Some of the nicest nurses I have ever met have been in nursing homes, however, they seem to be the laziest as well...and I hate to say that, and I'm sure it's apples and oranges but I would think there would be more attentiveness to the people (old people) who need the most care. 

Hospital nurses have always seemed extremely stressed to me and are either super nice or super mean. 

If you have a good nurse, it's like you feel so much more confident. You can be dying and you just feel like everything is going to be okay. That's why I don't understand WHY the doctors would be less respectful towards nurses in hospitals. 

My charge nurse Cindy at the nursing home I worked at and my mother's nurse at the hospital are why I decided to pursue nursing. One day I will right a letter to my charge nurse. She was very nice to me. 


Posted By: stardaqueenb23
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 5:36pm
Originally posted by goodm3 goodm3 wrote:

Originally posted by uppitynegroid uppitynegroid wrote:

One more thing and I'll get off my soapbox, lol.  I feel like Communications, English, Psychology bachelor degrees are for white people.  Yes, I really just said that.  Those majors are for people with trust funds and life long money they can depend on if things don't work out.

The same way you wouldn't borrow $50,000 and take it to a casino to play blackjack, you shouldn't take out student loans and pursue higher education in overly saturated fields.  We don't have any cushion or people to fall back on.  A lot of us are the first in our family to get degrees, or 1-st generation Americans, etc.  We can't afford to gamble like that. 




and add...history and business management (sorry if it ain't finance, acct or info systems its a no)
to the list
The thing with nursing is it is always a good option but you need to account for a few factors. If you are not BSN prepared and live in a major city you will have a hard time finding a sought after nursing job since most of the hospitals and their clinics are magnet status or chasing it. Also if you do not want to be a nurse and don't have a love for healing/helping people you will be miserable unless you go in to administrative nursing which is easier said than done without experience and a BSN. If you live in a rural area it is also easier to find work but take in to account nursing is a hard job/program. I also really believe in pursuing advanced or specialized nursing NP,CRNA, Diabetic Nurse Specialist, or becoming a physician assistant is the way to go.

I chuckle at the "those jobs are for white people" thing because I was told that often. The thing is if you are smart about a non stem major( go to a top program, get connections, intern and work while you are in school) you can do just fine. I used to be a CNA in a nursing home also started an LPN program and I hated it. I decided to do marketing and econ with a minor in business admin. A lot of the nurses that I worked with at the time told me I was wasting my time and those jobs were for white people. I even started a thread about it here during the time. When I graduated I interviewed with countless companies(Fox, CNN, ABC, Johnson & Johnson, to name a few.) and had 3 offers. I have upgraded for better opportunities each year since graduating. I also have recruiters contact me daily and I have not updated my resume in a year. Everyone I know from college is also doing well. A lot of these large corporations have minority recruiting efforts.
The company I work for now I hope to retire from( moving up the ladder of course.) I love what I do, I am paid well for my age/experience with great benefits and perks(I travel a lot, large expense account, drive corporate vehicle, etc) and I have very little job stress. In my current occupation I have helped some of those same nurses find employment after the nursing home cleaned house. If you know what you want and lay the foundation before you leave school you can do fine. Also location is important I live in NY where there is a lot of opportunity.



Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 6:31pm
[QUOTE=stardaqueenb23]

I chuckle at the "those jobs are for white people" thing because I was told that often.

I didn't say certain jobs were for white people, I said majors with poor job prospects were for white people.  Big difference.  Some people have a lot more room for failure than others because there is someone waiting to pick up the pieces for them until a decent job becomes available, while others don't.  Those others are usually colored.

The thing is if you are smart about a non stem major( go to a top program, get connections, intern and work while you are in school) you can do just fine.

This is what people keep telling students and its just not true.  A lot of graduates of law, mba, and psych programs have networked their butts off, interned for Fortune 50 companies, and still, nothing.  I think this is the kind of advice that leaves people high and dry.  Sure, a fraction of people who pursue these majors will get good results, but most just don't.  Telling people that the right combinaton of factors will lead them to quality employment is just not accurate. 

The way I see it, if you are black and have no safety net in place should your passion for a liberal arts lead to failure, then pursue a field with better job prospects.


Posted By: maysay1
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 6:40pm
Originally posted by uppitynegroid uppitynegroid wrote:


This is what people keep telling students and its just not true.  A lot of graduates of law, mba, and psych programs have networked their butts off, interned for Fortune 50 companies, and still, nothing.  I think this is the kind of advice that leaves people high and dry.  Sure, a fraction of people who pursue these majors will get good results, but most just don't.  Telling people that the right combinaton of factors will lead them to quality employment is just not accurate. 

The way I see it, if you are black and have no safety net in place should your passion for a liberal arts lead to failure, then pursue a field with better job prospects.


*nods head vigorously*...so much truth.

The bold makes me tthink of an article I read not too long ago (maybe it was posted here too?) about the black dude who was either in college or had graduated with a major in sociology or something similar whose family home was being foreclosed on. And the fact that he couldn't help his family even though the whole point of him going to college was so that he'd improve his financial position.

I tell the students that I work with that if they really have a passion for a liberal arts major, then do it. But it should be alongside another skill based major. If you really love something then you'll put in the work regardless. If you're not willing to do that, then you are certainly not the type of person who is going to be successful with just a liberal arts major and networking.


Posted By: stardaqueenb23
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 6:56pm
What types of business programs are you guys talking about? I ask because at my alma mater business was not a liberal arts degree. It is a BS with a heavy concentration on math, finance, accounting, and science. This is why I said the school you go to is also important.


Posted By: stardaqueenb23
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 7:13pm
Originally posted by uppitynegroid uppitynegroid wrote:


[QUOTE=stardaqueenb23]

I chuckle at the "those jobs are for white people" thing because I was told that often.

I
didn't say certain jobs were for white people, I said majors with poor
job prospects were for white people.  Big difference.  Some people have a
lot more room for failure than others because there is someone waiting
to pick up the pieces for them until a decent job becomes available,
while others don't.  Those others are usually colored.

The
thing is if you are smart about a non stem major( go to a top program,
get connections, intern and work while you are in school) you can do
just fine.


This is what people keep telling students and its
just not true.  A lot of graduates of law, mba, and psych programs have
networked their butts off, interned for Fortune 50 companies, and
still, nothing.  I think this is the kind of advice that leaves people
high and dry.  Sure, a fraction of people who pursue these majors will
get good results, but most just don't.  Telling people that the right
combinaton of factors will lead them to quality employment is just not
accurate. 

The way I see it, if you are black and have no safety
net in place should your passion for a liberal arts lead to failure,
then pursue a field with better job prospects.
I heard both those jobs and those majors are for white people on the floor. I agree with your last statement and that stem degrees are a safe bet. I disagree that nursing should be the go to degree(not saying you said this but it is becoming that way.) It is a great field to be in if you want to be a nurse and go in to it for the right reasons but a lot are not and they get burned out. This takes a toll on patient care quality and outcomes and is a factor of why so few pursue the higher nursing specialties. I love nurses so no disrespect intended but just my opinion.I rarely hear people steering black women towards the other stems and this gets on my nerves(once again not bhm, life experience.)

I also disagree that non stem degrees are a waste. I do believe there are factors that lead to success such as location, job experience, GPA, networking and university reputation. I have a lot of black friends with non stem degrees who are doing well for themselves and these factors are all in place.


Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: May 15 2014 at 7:27pm
Originally posted by stardaqueenb23 stardaqueenb23 wrote:



I also disagree that non stem degrees are a waste. I do believe there are factors that lead to success such as location, job experience, GPA, networking and university reputation. I have a lot of black friends with non stem degrees who are doing well for themselves and these factors are all in place.


Well then I guess we have different experiences because my black friends with those factors (Including one that went to a top 3 MBA program & Interned for a Fortune 100 company) are unemployed or underemployed.  I have yet to see someone in my personal life have something tangible to show for these degrees long-term. 


Posted By: sbrownie84
Date Posted: May 16 2014 at 12:24am
Bumping...rickysrose, afrokock....anyone else


Posted By: BitterSweet85
Date Posted: May 16 2014 at 10:36am
Great read


Posted By: dijah.love
Date Posted: May 16 2014 at 11:43am
You don't need to major in communications to work in communications. I'd do some things related to it on the side, for experience's sake, and get a degree in a technical skill to complement it.


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 16 2014 at 11:44am
my 2 cents 

If you still like to travel, then you'll want a high paying career where you can work from anywhere 
.. so I'd go the IT route. There are many roles that would make use of communications skills set so it's not necessarily far from what you originally wanted to do.

It's unconventional but here's my suggestion

For the least cost, to make the best use of your time and to maximize your earning potential:

1. Get a certification and start looking for an entry level IT job ... so by the time you finish school you'll have at least three years experience
2. Take as many Clep courses as you can, you can shave off up to 77 credits @ only $80 an exam and save a lot of time
3. Leverage your Clep courses and get an associates (just in case life happens and you can't complete the four year, you'll have something to show)
4. Leverage your associates into a 4yr from a good brick and mortar university (some have online IT degrees)

*apologize for typos I'm on my phone



Posted By: sbrownie84
Date Posted: May 16 2014 at 4:39pm
Rickysrose; I seriously thought of IT. Thank you


Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: May 16 2014 at 5:02pm
Nurses do way too much work for not enough credit, IMO.
but i guess that's most jobs. 



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