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HBCU Alum, Its Time to Step Up (long)

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Printed Date: Sep 22 2017 at 4:00am


Topic: HBCU Alum, Its Time to Step Up (long)
Posted By: NJHairLuv
Subject: HBCU Alum, Its Time to Step Up (long)
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:37am
Blog Post pasted below.
SUMMARY: Give back to the HBCU that you graduated from.

HBCU Alum, It's Time to Step Up:

http://www.phillbranch.com/2014/04/17/its-time-to-step-up-hbcugiveback/" rel="nofollow - http://www.phillbranch.com/2014/04/17/its-time-to-step-up-hbcugiveback/
https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/hbcugiveback" rel="nofollow - #HBCUGIVEBACK

They stole Harlem.
It’s not the real Brooklyn anymore.
“Chocolate City” is history.
You know they about to take Newark.
Macklemore is not hip-hop.
They twerkin’ now?
That is NOT the real Harlem Shake.
They stole jazz.
and repeat.

Add a couple game requests, misquoted bible verses, Buzzfeed, Lupita slaying the red carpet and Scandal Thursdays and that about sums up much of my social media timelines as of late.  Of all of the digital noise, the chatter about Brooklyn has really given me pause.

I’m not from Brooklyn, but I understand the strong emotions that are being stirred up in folks who feel marginalized and pushed out. The debates about so-called gentrification have me thinking about erasure. It not just that folks are being bumped out and that old haunts are disappearing, it’s also that they are being forgotten. At first there are still memories, but then by the time the third cupcake shop opens and after they knock down the row houses to make room for the stadium, people start to forget.

It would be great if we could identify the roots of change that are more tangible than the mysterious “they” who takes everything away. There’s a pretty vocal outcry about what is being taken from people, but barely a whisper about what people are giving away.

The distinction between being taken, or being given away is striking a chord with me as I plan for my class reunion at Hampton University. Over the last few months, I’ve read at least a dozen articles about the fate of HBCUs. The articles usually lean towards shaming alumni, blaming racism and chastising HBCUs for not keeping up with the times. Having recently served as a professor at Hampton, I am aware of some of the struggles that institutions face. Schools are closing, faculty are often stretched to their limits in terms of class loads, facility issues etc.

When I was in my 20s, I remember having a conversation with Hampton’s president, Dr. Harvey. He was asking me opinion about why younger people were not giving. I sat there and put all of the onus on Hampton. It was Hampton’s job to sell the school all over again to people who had already matriculated. I explained that some of them had issues with waiting in long lines, paperwork mixups, cafeteria food etc. Perplexed, he simply responded, “Hampton is your home. It’s part of your responsibility now to help take care of it.” He’s right.

I’m not going to gloss over the very real problems that exist at many HBCUs. There is work that needs to be done internally. I would be lying if I didn’t say that I have a love/hate (mostly love) with my own alma mater…but I still give back. I don’t want to give HBCUs away. I don’t want to lose them because of passive neglect.

This message isn’t really meant for people who don’t believe in the mission of HBCUs. It’s also not meant for people who had a truly terrible experience and now make a conscious choice not to give. I’m talking to the majority in the middle – we wear paraphernalia, go to homecomings, plan alumni mixers at local restaurants, but don’t take the time to go online and donate to the schools we love.

The conversations that public intellectuals are having about how race, unemployment and generational wealth impact HBCU alumni giving have nothing to do with why many of us have spent more money on homecoming outfits, than on giving. The bottom line is that we have to hold ourselves personally accountable for taking care of our own “homes.” Give back. It’s that simple.

I recognize that there are people who may not be able to give hundreds of dollars, but I am going to take a leap and say that I don’t know anyone who couldn’t put $5 on it.

Instead of endless theoretical debates, let’s take tangible steps towards being part of the solution. Join me in the #HBCUGIVEBACK movement over the next week. It’s this simple:


(1) Below is a list of HBCU links. Make a donation of any size to the school of your choice.

(2) Take a picture like the ones you see here. It should read:

I Give Back
because…
(tell us why you think giving is important)
#HBCUGIVEBACK
and then rep your school on the sign, or wear some ‘nalia. Be creative.

(3) Use the #HBCUGIVEBACK photo as your profile pic on your social media accounts.

(4) Share this post and encourage your friends to take part.

(5) Give a polite, virtual side-eye to your friends who don’t participate.

A few months back, 98% of my Facebook timeline had changed their profile pictures to a photo of a giraffe, because they couldn’t figure out a riddle. Hopefully we can get that same enthusiasm about something that can help change lives.

As I keep hearing about how much has been lost, or stolen, I can’t help but to think of how things might be a little different we put up stronger fights. I don’t ever want to ever hear:

They stole Hampton.
It’s not the real Spelman anymore.
“The Mecca” is history.
You know they about to take Tuskegee.

~ Phill Branch
Hampton University
Class of ‘94
OgreVIII (It’s a Hampton thing)



Replies:
Posted By: naturesgift
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:59am
Harlem has lost some of its flavor I am not even gonna lie! its sad! I will give to the HBCU's because I think they are important! The concept is so Abstract to some youth?


Posted By: sexyandfamous
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:04am
I read some articles about Howard University and other HBCUs struggling..... the sad part is that most students on those schools are in need of student loans. I wonder if those students give back after they graduate and get jobs.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:18am
I really loved this part of the blog post:

"When I was in my 20s, I remember having a conversation with Hampton’s president, Dr. Harvey. He was asking me opinion about why younger people were not giving. I sat there and put all of the onus on Hampton. It was Hampton’s job to sell the school all over again to people who had already matriculated. I explained that some of them had issues with waiting in long lines, paperwork mixups, cafeteria food etc. Perplexed, he simply responded, “Hampton is your home. It’s part of your responsibility now to help take care of it.” He’s right.

I’m not going to gloss over the very real problems that exist at many HBCUs. There is work that needs to be done internally. I would be lying if I didn’t say that I have a love/hate (mostly love) with my own alma mater…but I still give back. I don’t want to give HBCUs away. I don’t want to lose them because of passive neglect.

This message isn’t really meant for people who don’t believe in the mission of HBCUs. It’s also not meant for people who had a truly terrible experience and now make a conscious choice not to give. I’m talking to the majority in the middle – we wear paraphernalia, go to homecomings, plan alumni mixers at local restaurants, but don’t take the time to go online and donate to the schools we love."



Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 3:19am
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


oh so by the last paragraph, it seems like they aren't talking to me

I will pass this along to others


I know boo.I know.LOL


Posted By: ms_wonderland
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 12:40pm
Spelmans endowment isn't looking so hot in comparison to PWIs but as far as hbcus go spelman is doing well even though they have some shady investment dealings...what's curious to me is why they keep pouring money into the same schools while the other all women's hbcu is in a pathetic struggle.  The success of Spelman hasn't really translated to the uplift of bennett college which sucks...maybe close it and absorb it bc blk ppl w money just want to give to name brand institutions so both of their profiles are boosted.  Spelman only has 2k students so they need to boost the prestige of other hbcus.  North Carolina isn't as appealing of other states though.  Wel

I didn't go to an hbcu but I do want to help.


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 12:45pm
Thanks OP!

I will donate to the dept after I graduate and get a yob. The camaraderie at a HBCU compared to a non-hbcu is second to none.Smile


Posted By: BeatriceBean
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:05pm
YAAAAAASSSS!!!
 
 
The last time I went to UNCF board of trustees meeting, they said that the majority of HBCUs were staying afloat by implementing their affirmative action policies and funding more non-black students' educations. With all of the gripes that whites and Asians have regarding affirmative action, I can see many HBCUs tipping towards nonblacks being >50% in the not-too-distant future.
 
I think at least half of Howard U students don't know how they're going to pay for their next semester, yet so many non-black students educations are fully or at least 85% funded.
 
A lot has to change.


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:12pm
^Wait wut @ that last paragraph. 


Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:17pm
Originally posted by BeatriceBean BeatriceBean wrote:

YAAAAAASSSS!!!
 
 
The last time I went to UNCF board of trustees meeting, they said that the majority of HBCUs were staying afloat by implementing their affirmative action policies and funding more non-black students' educations. With all of the gripes that whites and Asians have regarding affirmative action, I can see many HBCUs tipping towards nonblacks being >50% in the not-too-distant future.
 
I think at least half of Howard U students don't know how they're going to pay for their next semester, yet so many non-black students educations are fully or at least 85% funded.
 
A lot has to change.

hey Mrs B. im not understanding what's happening, break it down for me please. how, why does this help the bottom line in the long run.

Could i get a list of all the HBCUs and location please or at least the top 7 Moorhouse, spelman, howard, is there also a Hampton?


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:21pm
Originally posted by BeatriceBean BeatriceBean wrote:

YAAAAAASSSS!!!
 
 
The last time I went to UNCF board of trustees meeting, they said that the majority of HBCUs were staying afloat by implementing their affirmative action policies and funding more non-black students' educations. With all of the gripes that whites and Asians have regarding affirmative action, I can see many HBCUs tipping towards nonblacks being >50% in the not-too-distant future.
 
I think at least half of Howard U students don't know how they're going to pay for their next semester, yet so many non-black students educations are fully or at least 85% funded.
 
A lot has to change.

Yes, I remember 20 years ago when, my college president informed us that there would be a shift to diversify to receive more funding. We all were shocked that it was necessary, but I now understand. When I look at the spreadsheets that show alumni giving, it is very hard to understand why people that have the means to donate (even $25 a year) and boast about what their school did for them do not donate. All 6 of my grandmother's children attended HBCUs, most of my cousins and close friends have at least 1 degree from an HBCU and 5 of my cousins graduated from the same school that I did. It very serious matter when you hear today's youth say 'I went to xyz HBCU for a semester, but I couldnt afford to stay'. Now that I am 40, a lot of my peers have children that are enrolling in college in the fall and the struggle for tuition is real. We have to help our youth by giving back to the schools.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:23pm
Originally posted by Diane (35) Diane (35) wrote:

Originally posted by BeatriceBean BeatriceBean wrote:

YAAAAAASSSS!!!
 
 
The last time I went to UNCF board of trustees meeting, they said that the majority of HBCUs were staying afloat by implementing their affirmative action policies and funding more non-black students' educations. With all of the gripes that whites and Asians have regarding affirmative action, I can see many HBCUs tipping towards nonblacks being >50% in the not-too-distant future.
 
I think at least half of Howard U students don't know how they're going to pay for their next semester, yet so many non-black students educations are fully or at least 85% funded.
 
A lot has to change.

hey Mrs B. im not understanding what's happening, break it down for me please. how, why does this help the bottom line in the long run.

Could i get a list of all the HBCUs and location please or at least the top 7 Moorhouse, spelman, howard, is there also a Hampton?

*In a nutshell, if you diversify the HBCU, you get more government & corporate funding.

*If you click on the link in the OP, at the bottom, there is a link that shows a list of all of the HBCU institutions BUT here is the link (There are a whole lot of schools)Smile: http://www.nhbcuaa.org/hbcuList.php" rel="nofollow - http://www.nhbcuaa.org/hbcuList.php  

*Yes, Diane-boo, ya gal is a Hampton LadyBig smileStarBig smile


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:27pm
Here is the list, sorted by Region:

Alabama
Alabama A&M University
Alabama State University
Concordia College Selma
Miles College
Oakwood University
Selma University
Stillman College
Talladega College
Tuskegee University
Bishop State Community College
Shelton State Community College, C.A. Fredd Campus
Gadsden State Community College, Valley Street
J.F. Drake State Technical College
Lawson State Community College
Trenholm State Technical College

Arkansas
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
Arkansas Baptist College
Philander Smith College
Shorter College

Delaware
Delaware State University

District of Columbia
The University of the District of Columbia
Howard University

Florida
Florida A&M University
Bethune-Cookman College
Edward Waters College
Florida Memorial University

Georgia
Albany State University
Fort Valley State University
Savannah State University
Clark Atlanta University
Interdenominational Theological Center
Morehouse College
Morehouse School of Medicine
Morris Brown College
Paine College
Spelman College

Kentucky
Kentucky State University

Louisiana
Grambling State University
Southern University A&M College
Southern University at New Orleans
Dillard University of Louisiana
Xavier University
Southern University at Shreveport

Maryland
Bowie State University
Coppin State College
Morgan State University
University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Michigan
Lewis College of Business

Mississippi
Alcorn State University
Jackson State University
Mississippi Valley State University
Rust College
Tougaloo College
Coahoma Community College
Hinds Community College, Utica
     

Missouri
Harris-Stowe State University
Lincoln University

North Carolina
Elizabeth City State University
Fayetteville State University
North Carolina A&T State University
North Carolina Central University
Winston-Salem State University
Barber-Scotia College
Bennett College
Johnson C. Smith University
Livingstone College
Shaw University
St. Augustine’s College

Ohio
Central State University
Wilberforce University

Oklahoma
Langston University

Pennsylvania
Cheyney University of Pennsylvania
Lincoln University

South Carolina
South Carolina State University
Allen University
Benedict College
Claflin University
Morris College
Voorhees College
Denmark Technical College
Clinton Junior College

Tennessee
Tennessee State University
Fisk University
Knoxville College
Lane College
Lemoyne-Owen College
Meharry Medical College

Texas
Prairie View A&M University
Texas Southern University
Huston-Tillotson University
Jarvis Christian College
Paul Quinn College
Southwestern Christian College
Texas College
Wiley College
St. Philip’s College

Virginia
Norfolk State University
Virginia State University
Hampton University
Saint Paul’s College
Virginia Union University
Virginia University of Lynchburg

West Virginia
Bluefield State College
West Virginia State University

U.S. Virgin Islands
University of the Virgin Islands


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:31pm
*Goes to go look up programs at Univ of Virgin Islands*




Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:35pm
Originally posted by carolina cutie carolina cutie wrote:

*Goes to go look up programs at Univ of Virgin Islands*



I know 2 people that went there and they didnt want to come back from paradiseLOL
The show College Hill had a season based there and I need to research being a professor there or something so I can chill on the beach eating fresh seafood under the gentle ocean breeze after work everyday


Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:39pm
Thank you glam!!!! My next question was gonna be if they are govt funded and to what extent. now i see. Tuskegee and about 4 others how did i forget? Are they generally cheaper than PWIs? 

We have a Hampton here too but its an all girl high (boarding) school.


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:43pm
Originally posted by NJHairLuv NJHairLuv wrote:

Originally posted by carolina cutie carolina cutie wrote:

*Goes to go look up programs at Univ of Virgin Islands*



I know 2 people that went there and they didnt want to come back from paradiseLOL
The show College Hill had a season based there and I need to research being a professor there or something so I can chill on the beach eating fresh seafood under the gentle ocean breeze after work everyday
Guuurl!

I can 'settle & hand out cheese' to the chillen's on the island versus here in the states.LOL


Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:46pm
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


Hampton was over 20k a year when I went there

UVA would have been cheaper for me

When i read the article i thought of you lolololol  the same part you had an issue with.

Is this related to the amt of funding then, generally less funding = higher tuition. 

I went to an HBCU (it had to be) in Jamaica but all of them were coonsCryCry and ______s.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:52pm
Originally posted by Diane (35) Diane (35) wrote:

Are they generally cheaper than PWIs?

Yes - There are low/mid/high cost HBCUs and PWIs, BUT most of the very expensive PWI are astronomically more than the HBCUs that are viewed as very expensive.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:54pm
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


Hampton is private

I don't know why it is, but it is

I'm sure they went over it in University 101, but I took that class 14 years ago

I think that has something to do with the funding there

Its private because it was established by a person, not the state and the way that it is filed has not changed.


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 1:59pm
Originally posted by Diane (35) Diane (35) wrote:

Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


I went to an HBCU (it had to be) in Jamaica but all of them were coonsCryCry and ______s.

Predominately black and 'Historically Black' are not the same! There are colleges that happen to have a whole lot of black folks enrolled that will never be a HBCU (Historically Black Institution).
If the school was founded back in the day with the objective of the education of black people, it is Historically black. A school can have high black enrollment due to regional demographics, recruitment blacks, have a black president with highblack enrollment,etc andnot be a HBCU.


Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:01pm
University 101 i wish we had that, most of my classmate couldnt tell you one lick about the history of the UWI (one army barrack) or the founding fathers and the obstacles and racism faced from the ENglish (wealthy black/browns sent their children abroad to England to study). They called it a Calypso Uni/Law school.

Hampton is private but still receives ext. funding incl govt. funds? the opposite of private is non-private/semi-private?

Glam and BB what methods have been found to be the most effective at getting alumni to donate?

What is the attitude on the ground towards Yts and non-blacks? annoyance? inclusion? no effs?


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:08pm
Originally posted by Diane (35) Diane (35) wrote:

Hampton is private but still receives ext. funding incl govt. funds? the others are non-private/semi-private?

Glam and BB what methods have been found to be the most effective at getting alumni to donate?

*Most public & private schools receivea mix of corporate & gvmt funds somehow & somewhere.
*The purpose of the article is to say that none knows how to effectively get alumni to give back. That is why so many schools are in financial crisis. No one knows and the schools are collapsing. Old people tend to give back, middle age and young people do not and the contributions of 80 year olds are not enough to carry these institutions forward. No one knows.





Posted By: Diane (35)
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:09pm
glam i was being tongue in cheek, we dont have the HBCU label here.

Okay i get the private classification now.

ETA Hmmmmm twitter glam, its twitter #HBCUOlympics. the author is right on the money


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:10pm
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


thanks glam

is Tuskegee a private university?

Yes, Tuskegee is private. In the link, the blue and the red schools are private institutions: http://www.nhbcuaa.org/hbcuList.php" rel="nofollow - http://www.nhbcuaa.org/hbcuList.php


Posted By: NJHairLuv
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:27pm
Originally posted by Diane (35) Diane (35) wrote:

glam i was being tongue in cheek, we dont have the HBCU label here.

Okay i get the private classification now.

ETA Hmmmmm twitter glam, its twitter #HBCUOlympics. the author is right on the money

OkLOL

Yeah, the HBCU label only applies to a small sector of schools in USA and a USA territory.

I will look up #HBCUOlympics now, thanks Diane!!!Smile


Posted By: BeatriceBean
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:32pm
Originally posted by NJHairLuv NJHairLuv wrote:

Originally posted by Diane (35) Diane (35) wrote:

Originally posted by BeatriceBean BeatriceBean wrote:

YAAAAAASSSS!!!
 
 
The last time I went to UNCF board of trustees meeting, they said that the majority of HBCUs were staying afloat by implementing their affirmative action policies and funding more non-black students' educations. With all of the gripes that whites and Asians have regarding affirmative action, I can see many HBCUs tipping towards nonblacks being >50% in the not-too-distant future.
 
I think at least half of Howard U students don't know how they're going to pay for their next semester, yet so many non-black students educations are fully or at least 85% funded.
 
A lot has to change.

hey Mrs B. im not understanding what's happening, break it down for me please. how, why does this help the bottom line in the long run.

Could i get a list of all the HBCUs and location please or at least the top 7 Moorhouse, spelman, howard, is there also a Hampton?

*In a nutshell, if you diversify the HBCU, you get more government & corporate funding.

*If you click on the link in the OP, at the bottom, there is a link that shows a list of all of the HBCU institutions BUT here is the link (There are a whole lot of schools)Smile: http://www.nhbcuaa.org/hbcuList.php" rel="nofollow - http://www.nhbcuaa.org/hbcuList.php  

*Yes, Diane-boo, ya gal is a Hampton LadyBig smileStarBig smile
 
Thank you, NJ!
 
Many HBCUs are in or have been in danger at some point of merging, closing down or losing accreditation due to low funding, misappropriated funds, etc. In order to stay afloat, they receive subsidies from the federal and/or state governments which require a certain percentage of "diversity," meaning a school receiving government funds cannot be an all-black institution.
 
Often non-black students receive diversity, athletic or merit scholarships to lure them to come and to stay. Meanwhile, many black students, at historically black colleges and universities, have to fight financial aid offices and borrow out of house and home in order to stay in school (which, unfortunately is the case for many students at colleges across the board). However, larger endowments funded by alumni and private donors would allow more freedom to maintain the integrity of these schools' original purposes: to educate and empower our people.


Posted By: PurplePhase
Date Posted: Apr 17 2014 at 2:34pm
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