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Not a single AA took AP test in CS in 11 States

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Topic: Not a single AA took AP test in CS in 11 States
Posted By: tatee
Subject: Not a single AA took AP test in CS in 11 States
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 12:41pm

http://thinkprogress.org/education/2014/01/14/3160181/test-girls-race/" rel="nofollow - Not A Single Female Student Took The AP Computer Science Test In Two States

By http://thinkprogress.org/person/bcovert/" rel="nofollow - Bryce Covert https://twitter.com/intent/user?screen_name=brycecovert" rel="nofollow"> on January 14, 2014 at 11:48 am

 

"Not A Single Female Student Took The AP Computer Science Test In Two States"

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http://thinkprogress.org/education/2014/01/14/3160181/test-girls-race/#" rel="nofollow - Girl student takes test

CREDIT: Shutterstock

In Mississippi and Montana, http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2014/01/girls_african_americans_and_hi.html" rel="nofollow - no female students took the Advanced Placement (AP) test in computer science last year. In 47 other states where girls did take the test, they made up less than a third of the test takers, and in Utah they were as low as 4 percent of all test takers. (No students took the test at all in Wyoming.) Out of the 30,000 students who took the test last year, less than 20 percent were girls.

People of color had even lower representation among test takers. Not a single African-American student took the test in 11 states, no Hispanic student took it in eight, and they made up 3 percent and 8 percent of all test takers, respectively. The highest proportion both groups reached were 10 percent for black students in Maryland and 18 percent for Hispanic students in Texas.

Girls and students of color also have lower pass rates on the test than white boys, and black students have the lowest rate of all.

These groups still http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/09/10/2599491/women-stem/" rel="nofollow - struggle to be represented in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs , or the STEM field, despite a need for more of these workers and the high pay that they can expect. Women hold just a quarter of these jobs and progress in growing that number has petered out since 1990. Worse, their share of computer jobs has fallen since then. Black workers hold just 6 percent of STEM jobs despite making up 11 percent of the overall workforce, while Hispanics hold 7 percent of the jobs yet are 15 percent of the workforce. White workers hold 71 percent of these jobs.

But if these students aren’t being encouraged or guided into these fields at a young age, that may be part of the reason they hold so few of these jobs. The AP prep course for computer science has students design and create computer programs, hands-on experience that could spark an interest in the field. The new president of the College Board, which oversees the AP exams, has said he is focused on http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/10/25/10collegeboard.h32.html" rel="nofollow - expanding access to underserved groups of students and especially on closing the racial test-taking gap.

Even when women and people of color do manage to make it into these fields, however, they can still expect to be paid less than white men. Women who work in STEM jobs make $75,100 on average, while men make $91,000. Blacks make $75,000 and Hispanics make $77,300, compared to $88,400 for white workers.

http://thinkprogress.org/education/2014/01/14/3160181/test-girls-race/




Replies:
Posted By: melikey
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 12:52pm
I'm old. . Didn't even know there was such a thing.


Posted By: femmefatale85
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 12:53pm
Ugh...young people aren't going to be useful in the job force, it's kind of scary




Posted By: blaquefoxx
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:01pm
Cuz we busy making new dances n sh!tSleepy


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:02pm
This is definitely my topic of interest. 

This is purely anecdotal so take it as such: But I have a huge problem with people in the STEM field, or STEM majors. Its been my observation that these white, asian and indian men think they're the sh*t because they can do a little math or a little coding and they start to get a very elitist attitude. And It's been my experience that they tend to discourage women and minorities from entering in this field because it weakens it to them. Like they all of a sudden wouldn't be special anymore. And I feel most people in society have an implicit attitude that minorities and women can't handle the work and therefore we are discouraged from going the STEM route at a young age. And then when we do decide to enter into the STEM world we're discriminated against: We aren't offered funding for our research, we're paid less, we're subject to workplace harassment, we're not invited to the study groups, etc. 




Posted By: AwesomeAries
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:17pm
Them damn classes are hard though
but I believe we can do it


Posted By: Printer_Ink
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:17pm
I have never heard of STEM but as a female AA, I started studying computer science back when there were only mainframe computers .. before desktops, laptops etc. :) My mother was a Computer Programmer wrote programs for NASA in the 1960's ...so I guesa it's in my blood.

I think it is sad that Black folks are not taking advantege of the oppurtunities in this field. I must say .. in all these years I have never experienced workplace harrassment, racial problems etc I have worked at companies like DEC and IBM etc.

Computer work is fairly straight forward - you can;t turn a 0 to a 1 ... just because you are Black.

It does pay well, allows you to go independant and it opens up job oppurtunities for you around the world.

If I had not gotten into computers .. I would still be working some job in The States .. wishing I could work/live in Paris, Naples .. you name it.

The world is your oyster .. IF you have the skills.


Posted By: tatee
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:19pm
thanx for the insight CSThumbs Up


Posted By: Krystal Klear
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:26pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

This is definitely my topic of interest. 

This is purely anecdotal so take it as such: But I have a huge problem with people in the STEM field, or STEM majors. Its been my observation that these white, asian and indian men think they're the sh*t because they can do a little math or a little coding and they start to get a very elitist attitude. And It's been my experience that they tend to discourage women and minorities from entering in this field because it weakens it to them. Like they all of a sudden wouldn't be special anymore. And I feel most people in society have an implicit attitude that minorities and women can't handle the work and therefore we are discouraged from going the STEM route at a young age. And then when we do decide to enter into the STEM world we're discriminated against: We aren't offered funding for our research, we're paid less, we're subject to workplace harassment, we're not invited to the study groups, etc. 


I agree with this, I also feel that its the same in other corporate positions , high paying civil service jobs, and sports.  Notice they keep the price for hockey, tennis, lacross, and golf VERY HIGH so we cant afford it.   My cousin tried to get her kids in some other sports besides basketball and football, but she couldn't afford it.  I think they are afraid once we get in our superior athleticism will dim their shine


Posted By: Printer_Ink
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:29pm
Umm Sports are one thing ... but I don't see what this has to do with academics in terms of the computer science field.


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:34pm
My school didnt even offer an AP Computer Science class, and we were the last predominately AA school in the district. As a matter of fact, I think the only schools who offered this were the mostly white ones.

It's also important to note that white teachers and counselors in mostly white environments are known for discouraging AA and Lationos from taking courses like this, even going so far as to change the schedules of these kids so it creates a conflict with their graduation requirements. 


Posted By: Yardgirl
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:36pm
I'm a Computing & IT graduate and I work for an ICT service provider that employs lots of engineers. There are many female programmers and engineers here and when I was in undergrad we had a a sizeable number of female students in the Computing programme (not so much in the core engineering programmes though). 

This is Jamaica (the island is 90% black) and if we can handle STEM jobs then Black people anywhere in the world can. Someone needs to initiate a programme that encourages women and minorities to take up STEM careers and both groups, particularly minorities, need more visibility in the field.


Posted By: newdiva1
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:38pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

This is definitely my topic of interest. 

This is purely anecdotal so take it as such: But I have a huge problem with people in the STEM field, or STEM majors. Its been my observation that these white, asian and indian men think they're the sh*t because they can do a little math or a little coding and they start to get a very elitist attitude. And It's been my experience that they tend to discourage women and minorities from entering in this field because it weakens it to them. Like they all of a sudden wouldn't be special anymore. And I feel most people in society have an implicit attitude that minorities and women can't handle the work and therefore we are discouraged from going the STEM route at a young age. And then when we do decide to enter into the STEM world we're discriminated against: We aren't offered funding for our research, we're paid less, we're subject to workplace harassment, we're not invited to the study groups, etc. 


 
 
 
I agree.  I still remember to this day how my counselors discouraged me.  I mean...math is not my thing anyways but it's the principalities.  U tell me flat out I can't do it and I should look into social services?  Not in a reverse psychology type of way but dead ass serious?  I still get mad thinking about it.


Posted By: yaya24
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:39pm
I enjoyed my AP / Science and Technology classes.. but that career path is not for everyone.

It is important that parents train and teach their children to challenge themselves academically though.

My Dad has been an engineer for over 30 years.


Posted By: Sang Froid
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:46pm
Never knew there was an AP Computer Science test.
Anywho....my kids will be learning how to code early on.


Posted By: NARSAddict
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:47pm
Originally posted by AwesomeAries AwesomeAries wrote:

Them damn classes are hard though
but I believe we can do it



The classes are not hard per se, it's just that you need to practice more and more until you become proficient.  I believe that is the problem because there are people out there who have been exposed to math and sciences at a young age and they have been given opportunities to improve their craft.  An analogy I would like to use is playing an instrument.  If you only do the bare ass minimum, you get minimal results but if you dedicate hours to it, your competency improves.  Anyway I am just paraphrasing in what I have read in this book that talks about learning and competency.  Same can be said about doing hair, makeup, walking in heels, sewing, etc.


Posted By: Krystal Klear
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 1:57pm
Originally posted by Printer_Ink Printer_Ink wrote:

Umm Sports are one thing ... but I don't see what this has to do with academics in terms of the computer science field.
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

This is definitely my topic of interest. 

This is purely anecdotal so take it as such: But I have a huge problem with people in the STEM field, or STEM majors. Its been my observation that these white, asian and indian men think they're the sh*t because they can do a little math or a little coding and they start to get a very elitist attitude. And It's been my experience that they tend to discourage women and minorities from entering in this field because it weakens it to them. Like they all of a sudden wouldn't be special anymore. And I feel most people in society have an implicit attitude that minorities and women can't handle the work and therefore we are discouraged from going the STEM white sports route at a young age. And then when we do decide to enter into the STEM world we're discriminated against: We aren't offered funding for our research, we're paid less, we're subject to workplace harassment, we're not invited to the study groups, etc. 




Posted By: AmiliaCabral
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 7:47pm
they didn't have an AP CS class at my high school 10 years ago and they still don't. If anybody wanted to take it they gotta do independent study and take the test on their own, get a tutor or go to another high school if they allow it. In fact my school only offered three AP courses, English 3, 4 and art history 

You already know the school is all black and latino

And most of us didn't have a computer in the home to practice on anyway, there were only two working at a time in the lab


Posted By: melikey
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 7:56pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

This is definitely my topic of interest. 

This is purely anecdotal so take it as such: But I have a huge problem with people in the STEM field, or STEM majors. Its been my observation that these white, asian and indian men think they're the sh*t because they can do a little math or a little coding and they start to get a very elitist attitude. And It's been my experience that they tend to discourage women and minorities from entering in this field because it weakens it to them. Like they all of a sudden wouldn't be special anymore. And I feel most people in society have an implicit attitude that minorities and women can't handle the work and therefore we are discouraged from going the STEM route at a young age. And then when we do decide to enter into the STEM world we're discriminated against: We aren't offered funding for our research, we're paid less, we're subject to workplace harassment, we're not invited to the study groups, etc. 



I'm an engineer by education, it's really not that bad. Sorry you are experiencing such discouragement. I think engineers are odd because we have very strong women and minority collegiate organizations (NSBE, SHE, SWE). I had fun in undergrad and grad school and was pretty well adjusted to handle the workplace. I don't want my future kids to be engineers though, science undergrad is ok but advanced degrees are a no-no but that's another topicLOL




Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 7:59pm
I took ap courses cuz my brain needed the challenge. Didn't bother with the tests. Not a biggie


Posted By: _ConcreteRose_
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 8:04pm
Meliky NSBE has been great to me! 

But I've had horrible experiences. I've been told Im not good enough to take clsses that other people in my grade have taken, I've been the only black girl in a few classes, I've been called a nicca, it's not fun. I could tell you stories for days.

ETA: I should add not everyone is bad. I've met many helpful people and good friends. But it's more structural (not the word Im looking for) if anything. All the Asians study together, All the white boys have their. I don't really have a group like that to work through and support so Im at a disadvantage. (except nsbe, but theres only 1 person w/my major in it).


Posted By: eanaj5
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 8:06pm
Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

I took ap courses cuz my brain needed the challenge. Didn't bother with the tests. Not a biggie

this


Posted By: melikey
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 8:07pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

Meliky NSBE has been great to me! 

But I've had horrible experiences. I've been told Im not good enough to take classes that other people in my grade have taken, I've been the only black girl in a few classes, I've been called a nicca, it's not fun. I could tell you stories for days.

oh my! yeah that is pretty deep. Cry
i had quite a few african international students at my undergrad, so I always had a black person in the room who was smarter than everyone elseLOL.. that might have held them back too.


Posted By: hopeful
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 8:46pm
most of my classes were ap classes in my senior year, but i couldn't afford the tests.


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 9:09pm
Im glad you said that Hopeful, because I completely forgot that we had to pay for the tests. I think it'd be interesting to see which 11 states saw no AA's taking this test, and see if they matched up with states with poorer black populations. 


Posted By: hopeful
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 9:50pm
I'm in MD, and they recently started waiving fees for low income students, which is partially why I think the AA % in MD is high.


Posted By: uppitynegroid
Date Posted: Jan 14 2014 at 10:02pm
I knew they had AP for C++ but not Computer Science...or is that the same thing.  Anyway, its unfortunate black students aren't interested.  My boo has a degree in computer science.  I'm getting one in a health care field.  Would be nice if more black people went this route...


Posted By: dee1672
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 10:08am
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

This is definitely my topic of interest. 

This is purely anecdotal so take it as such: But I have a huge problem with people in the STEM field, or STEM majors. Its been my observation that these white, asian and indian men think they're the sh*t because they can do a little math or a little coding and they start to get a very elitist attitude. And It's been my experience that they tend to discourage women and minorities from entering in this field because it weakens it to them. Like they all of a sudden wouldn't be special anymore. And I feel most people in society have an implicit attitude that minorities and women can't handle the work and therefore we are discouraged from going the STEM route at a young age. And then when we do decide to enter into the STEM world we're discriminated against: We aren't offered funding for our research, we're paid less, we're subject to workplace harassment, we're not invited to the study groups, etc. 





This is the exact opposite of my experience.*Shrugs*


Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 10:16am
is STEM science technology engineering and math?
if so, for science i wouldnt say i was ever discouraged, especially from research
but i know of several programs dedicated to getting minorities into those fields. and im sure they are they out of necessity 




Posted By: EPITOME
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 11:00am
I took about six AP classes and tests. None were science related.... No that's a lie.... I took AP Bio. I got that little certificate you get when you take a certain number of tests and get 4s and up.

My dh and I payed for his niece to take one test.


Posted By: Senior Detective
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 11:16am
Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

is STEM science technology engineering and math?
if so, for science i wouldnt say i was ever discouraged, especially from research
but i know of several programs dedicated to getting minorities into those fields. and im sure they are they out of necessity 


yes


Posted By: trudawg
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 11:52am
Not that surprising. Most IT related jobs don't require computer science degrees with the right certifications and experience.


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 1:25pm
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


I took AP Physics and IB Enfglish and Art (lol)

I passed the IB English test and only had to take one semester of honors English in college

I did not pass the Art test lol. Which is okay because if I did I probably would have stupidly minored in something art related.

Never cared to take the AP Physics test, I got a B+ in that class

Hardcore sciences never really interested me

I do wish I went to a Science and Technology high school though

I was in a program for math and science at one of the top high schools in America (ranked #4 nationally and #1 in the state) and had the opportunity to enroll there but chose not to because I wanted to go to school with my friends.....
Yeah. Similar situation. I passed on going to a IB High school to stay with friends.


Posted By: Sang Froid
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 1:30pm
I left an IB school to go be with friends.
I hated that school. 


Posted By: coconess
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 2:36pm
i wish i could go back to hs... 




Posted By: Ming
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 2:43pm
I took AP and honors classes. They put me in a cisco course... ditched with other AP kids. Dumbest thing I did.


Posted By: purpulicious01
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:04pm
Originally posted by _ConcreteRose_ _ConcreteRose_ wrote:

This is definitely my topic of interest. 

This is purely anecdotal so take it as such: But I have a huge problem with people in the STEM field, or STEM majors. Its been my observation that these white, asian and indian men think they're the sh*t because they can do a little math or a little coding and they start to get a very elitist attitude. And It's been my experience that they tend to discourage women and minorities from entering in this field because it weakens it to them. Like they all of a sudden wouldn't be special anymore. And I feel most people in society have an implicit attitude that minorities and women can't handle the work and therefore we are discouraged from going the STEM route at a young age. And then when we do decide to enter into the STEM world we're discriminated against: We aren't offered funding for our research, we're paid less, we're subject to workplace harassment, we're not invited to the study groups, etc. 




great point 

I will never forget hearing teachers tell female students that "it is ok you're not good at math - you're just a girl." The irony was that many of these teachers were female.

Our society still has many stereotypes and narrow minded, ignorant views on women and what we are capable of; and I think these stereotypes and prejudices have a lot to do with the lack of females majoring in these fields. 

I mean, I think there are other factors that contribute to the issue (i.e. our priorities - unfortunately education is not a priority for many kids today) 

eta: I think it'll be a great idea to start brainstorming initiatives to encourage not only females, but female minorities, to enter these fields. I do know women who professionals in the STEM field, but not many are AA - majority are all females from Southeast Asia (India, Pakistan, etc) 


Posted By: Random Thoughts
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:07pm
I got a 2 in one of my AP tests. Dead


Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:13pm
I got a 2 in AP Chemistry too RT.
I CLEP'ed out in college though.

My teacher in highschool was trash we were trash students too.
We would jump out of the window and climb to the roof of the school to avoid her


Posted By: coconess
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:31pm
i barely went to class..
HS was a social/fashion/stunting thing for me


Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:33pm
We were done with everything and everybody in our AP group had 4.0's and above anyway so we were just bad as hell.
We just took college courses , applied for scholarships, and misbehaved.




Posted By: Sang Froid
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:40pm
Our grades/attendance and everything was in the school system.
Since my mom worked for the district she would see everything instantly.
Wasn't no skippin' class. 


Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:46pm
We still were on school propety


Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 3:50pm
i didnt skip  
and lord knows i wasnt into fashion
my friend invited me a club and i was asking if i had to wear heels
my prom dress Dead


Posted By: Yardgirl
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 5:50pm
Originally posted by trudawg trudawg wrote:

Not that surprising. Most IT related jobs don't require computer science degrees with the right certifications and experience.

My employer won't hire anyone for a technical position without a degree. Degrees are way too prevalent now. Besides they stress that they want engineers, not technicians; certifications aren't enough.


Posted By: PurplePhase
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 7:28pm
Originally posted by Printer_Ink Printer_Ink wrote:

I have never heard of STEM but as a female AA, I started studying computer science back when there were only mainframe computers .. before desktops, laptops etc. :) My mother was a Computer Programmer wrote programs for NASA in the 1960's ...so I guesa it's in my blood.

I think it is sad that Black folks are not taking advantege of the oppurtunities in this field. I must say .. in all these years I have never experienced workplace harrassment, racial problems etc I have worked at companies like DEC and IBM etc.
 


do you remember PROFS?


Posted By: PurplePhase
Date Posted: Jan 18 2014 at 7:31pm
I hate that there aren't more women in the field and especially black women. I do see more black women these days  and hopefully it's not as difficult  now.

 I will never forget a meeting where I demo'ed a program I'd written for the client and after my presentation, a man asked me if my husband had taught me how to do that.  what??



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