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Man catchin Beignets

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Printed Date: Jun 18 2018 at 1:36am


Topic: Man catchin Beignets
Posted By: naturesgift
Subject: Man catchin Beignets
Date Posted: May 08 2013 at 9:43pm

Anyone got a recipie for Beignets? I need to catch a husband! I have never actually had one of these but I just learned that these ARE TOTALLY from Africa! So Nigerians please chime in with your best Puff Puff recipie~




Replies:
Posted By: Jewelsnyc
Date Posted: May 08 2013 at 9:59pm
Google is your friend...if Google's busy, try Bing...


Posted By: danieb23
Date Posted: May 08 2013 at 10:04pm
Beignets are African?

Either way, cafe du monde sells a box mix that can usually be found
In a lot of stores. You may be able to search the website for local retailers


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 08 2013 at 10:12pm
I tried the Paula Deen recipe and dressed it up to my liking and it was really good!


Posted By: naturesgift
Date Posted: May 08 2013 at 10:34pm
Originally posted by Jewelsnyc Jewelsnyc wrote:

Google is your friend...if Google's busy, try Bing...
if you cant help then why comment? I want something more personal thanks


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 08 2013 at 11:20pm
Originally posted by danieb23 danieb23 wrote:

Beignets are African? I think she means that you can trace it's roots from africa, but in general they are known to be  known from NahleansLOL.. aka New Orleans

Either way, cafe du monde sells a box mix that can usually be found
In a lot of stores. You may be able to search the website for local retailers


Posted By: yurika975
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 2:29am
I was thinking New Orleans. First thing I thought about was Princess and the Frog, when Tia's friend wants some of her famous man loving beignets. 


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 3:12am
Originally posted by naturesgift naturesgift wrote:

Anyone got a recipie for Beignets? I need to catch a husband! I have never actually had one of these but I just learned that these ARE TOTALLY from Africa! So Nigerians please chime in with your best Puff Puff recipie~



Where'd you hear that?


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 3:16am
Also, I've made beignets before, they're not that hard. You dont necessarily need a deep fryer, but it'll make the process a whole lot easier. I just used a recipe from the internet, or the Cafe Du Monde mix. 


Posted By: uNaTtaiNAblE88
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 3:44am
I'm not gonna lie, I came in here thinking I was gonna see a man literally catching beignets, like juggling them or something. 

Those look so yummy, they're one of the things I wanna try when I visit New Orleans.


Posted By: danieb23
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:10am
Originally posted by f8dagrate f8dagrate wrote:

Originally posted by danieb23 danieb23 wrote:

Beignets are African? I think she means that you can trace it's roots from africa, but in general they are known to be  known from NahleansLOL.. aka New Orleans

Either way, cafe du monde sells a box mix that can usually be found
In a lot of stores. You may be able to search the website for local retailers


Not sure about tracing them back to Africa, but I thought the general consensus were that they were French doughnuts that are popular in nawlins


Posted By: Limalady
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 10:54am
They are African. The pastry style is French though. Y'all don't have to know. My people know what we made, and what White people stole.


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 10:57am
Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

They are African. The pastry style is French though. Y'all don't have to know. My people know what we made, and what White people stole.

Wait, huh?Confused
'Splain!Geek


ETA: Are you saying that they originated from Africa from pastry techniques learned from the French? But how'd they get over here?


Posted By: Limalady
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 11:02am
Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

They are African. The pastry style is French though. Y'all don't have to know. My people know what we made, and what White people stole.

Wait, huh?Confused
'Splain!Geek


ETA: Are you saying that they originated from Africa from pastry techniques learned from the French? But how'd they get over here?
 
No. I'm saying that "as I know it," there is an African style beignet (in Nigeria we have something called puff. I don't know what it is in other places). It isn't really a dessert. It is more of a side dish served with stew. No confectioner's sugar. The dessert style pastry is French, so the pastry style dessert is French. It is well-known that the French colonized many parts of Africa, so I'm saying they may have seen a dish and decided to take creative liberties. I'm not trying to down the French. Sorry if this offends you.


Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 11:54am
cafe du monde 


Posted By: naturesgift
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 12:24pm
OMG! why we debating over the orgin of this- does anyone have a actual recipe that is not from a box~ :) like a family recipie with some sort of secrect that they need to PM me... I tried making Nigerian Puff-Puffs and they didnt Puff at all... I need help


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 1:45pm
Truth be told, just about every culture in the world has their own version of beignets. I just think there happens to be an African version. Les beignets is very much a French staple. However it's quite possible that New Orleans added an African twist to it. After all, new Orleans food is a mixture of French, African/west indian, so that would make perfect sense.
On another note, I've rarely dealt with men who enjoyed sweets all that much, for some reason. Not even the ones in my family. A good T-Bone is more likely to reel them in, lol
 


Posted By: Jewelsnyc
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 1:55pm
Originally posted by naturesgift naturesgift wrote:

Originally posted by Jewelsnyc Jewelsnyc wrote:

Google is your friend...if Google's busy, try Bing...
if you cant help then why comment? I want something more personal thanks
Cause I wanted to....


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 2:06pm
Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

They are African. The pastry style is French though. Y'all don't have to know. My people know what we made, and what White people stole.

Wait, huh?Confused
'Splain!Geek


ETA: Are you saying that they originated from Africa from pastry techniques learned from the French? But how'd they get over here?
 
No. I'm saying that "as I know it," there is an African style beignet (in Nigeria we have something called puff. I don't know what it is in other places). It isn't really a dessert. It is more of a side dish served with stew. No confectioner's sugar. The dessert style pastry is French, so the pastry style dessert is French. It is well-known that the French colonized many parts of Africa, so I'm saying they may have seen a dish and decided to take creative liberties. I'm not trying to down the French. Sorry if this offends you.
 
Honestly, I don't believe that. The French have a strong culinary gastronomy of their own and French pastry including "beignets" has been around forever. So I really don't think that the French stole the idea for beignets from Africa. HOWEVER, New Orleans food is basically French west indian food and French west indian food is basically a mix of African and French food, which is why it's quite possible that the New Orleans beignets have more of an African flair than the traditional French beignets.


Posted By: Jewelsnyc
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 2:07pm
see you was being stank but I'm still gonna look out...
 


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 2:14pm
Here's a beignet from Guadeloupe. We have this at Mardi Gras. See the resemblance? The detail they put in the shape of it and the sugaring? At the same time, see how it resembles African fat cakes? It's all connected via the slave trade.
 
http://www.kazeo.com/sites/fr/photos/200/--beignets-de-carnaval--_2003211-M.jpg" rel="nofollow">
 
Now here is the Haitian beignet that we have during Carnival
 
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xswbF7emyPA/T18p8TBvsdI/AAAAAAAAKjI/BUAp2eDJbOE/s1600/beignet-carnaval-haitien.jpg" rel="nofollow">
 
Common denominator: French styling + African flair
 
Some Haitians also make beignets that look just like the guadeloupean ones I posted above but I can't get the pic to show
http://mangeonslakay.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/fnm_090110-recipe-winner-002_s4x3_lg.jpg" rel="nofollow -


Posted By: goodm3
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 2:34pm
Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

cafe du monde 

Last time I went to N.O. this place made my entire trip. 


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 2:34pm
Originally posted by goodm3 goodm3 wrote:

Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

cafe du monde 

Last time I went to N.O. this place made my entire trip. 
 
I wish I'd managed to go before Katrina. I always said I would go one day but now I feel that a lot of the landmarks are gone


Posted By: danieb23
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:07pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

They are African. The pastry style is French though. Y'all don't have to know. My people know what we made, and what White people stole.


Wait, huh?Confused
'Splain!Geek


ETA: Are you saying that they originated from Africa from pastry techniques learned from the French? But how'd they get over here?


 
No. I'm saying that "as I know it," there is an African style beignet (in Nigeria we have something called puff. I don't know what it is in other places). It isn't really a dessert. It is more of a side dish served with stew. No confectioner's sugar. The dessert style pastry is French, so the pastry style dessert is French. It is well-known that the French colonized many parts of Africa, so I'm saying they may have seen a dish and decided to take creative liberties. I'm not trying to down the French. Sorry if this offends you.

 
Honestly, I don't believe that. The French have a strong culinary gastronomy of their own and French pastry including "beignets" has been around forever. So I really don't think that the French stole the idea for beignets from Africa. HOWEVER, New Orleans food is basically French west indian food and French west indian food is basically a mix of African and French food, which is why it's quite possible that the New Orleans beignets have more of an African flair than the traditional French beignets.


Hmm, creole food isnt comprised of a lot of african influence
In it. It's mainly French/Spanish/ and a bit west Indian (which has the African essence in it) Influece.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:18pm
Originally posted by danieb23 danieb23 wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

They are African. The pastry style is French though. Y'all don't have to know. My people know what we made, and what White people stole.


Wait, huh?Confused
'Splain!Geek


ETA: Are you saying that they originated from Africa from pastry techniques learned from the French? But how'd they get over here?


 
No. I'm saying that "as I know it," there is an African style beignet (in Nigeria we have something called puff. I don't know what it is in other places). It isn't really a dessert. It is more of a side dish served with stew. No confectioner's sugar. The dessert style pastry is French, so the pastry style dessert is French. It is well-known that the French colonized many parts of Africa, so I'm saying they may have seen a dish and decided to take creative liberties. I'm not trying to down the French. Sorry if this offends you.

 
Honestly, I don't believe that. The French have a strong culinary gastronomy of their own and French pastry including "beignets" has been around forever. So I really don't think that the French stole the idea for beignets from Africa. HOWEVER, New Orleans food is basically French west indian food and French west indian food is basically a mix of African and French food, which is why it's quite possible that the New Orleans beignets have more of an African flair than the traditional French beignets.


Hmm, creole food isnt comprised of a lot of african influence
In it. It's mainly French/Spanish/ and a bit west Indian (which has the African essence in it) Influece.
 
It's a whole lot more than a bit!!! I know Creole food and having a French west indian mom and a Haitian dad, I can tell you that the west indian influence is all up in there and it makes perfect sense if you look at the history.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:19pm
My mom is also French, via Guadeloupe, so I know what I'm talking about. Consider that the slaves had a huge influence in shaping the gastronomy of that area. There's also some French Canadian influences in there. The African influence manifests itself through the west indian influence.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:28pm
I'm always shocked that americans don't know this


Posted By: danieb23
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:30pm
I'm creole as well with family out of New Orleans and I know the food as well--that's all we eat!
By a bit, I mean the major influence is in Spanish/French food. West Indian influence is not the predominant factor in creole food.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:31pm
Originally posted by danieb23 danieb23 wrote:

I'm creole as well with family out of New Orleans and I know the food as well--that's all we eat!
By a bit, I mean the major influence is in Spanish/French food. West Indian influence is not the predominant factor in creole food.
 
Well, y'all are downplaying the west indian influence because when I eat creole food, I find it incredibly reminiscent. The gumbo, the crab, the beans etc.. It's actually why I like it


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:32pm
The Jambalaya is the perfect mixture of French and west indian/african
 
I forgot the Crawfish Etouffee, the red beans and rice and the beignets that started this thread.
Ask any French west indian if they don't have a version of those dishes in similar names


Posted By: danieb23
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:41pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by danieb23 danieb23 wrote:

I'm creole as well with family out of New Orleans and I know the food as well--that's all we eat!
By a bit, I mean the major influence is in Spanish/French food. West Indian influence is not the predominant factor in creole food.

 
Well, y'all are downplaying the west indian influence because when I eat creole food, I find it incredibly reminiscent. The gumbo, the crab, the beans etc.. It's actually why I like it


We're not downplaying it, it's simply not the main influence in the food. It's a big part, but not the main influence which is French and Spanish. It's still acknowledged as a part of the culture however.

When I've done projects and research on Louisiana Creoles, the French/Spanish influence is predominent. And the west Indian/ native America attributed were contributing factors.

At the end of the day, all the cultures have their own creative additive to the culture as a whole.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 4:49pm
Originally posted by danieb23 danieb23 wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by danieb23 danieb23 wrote:

I'm creole as well with family out of New Orleans and I know the food as well--that's all we eat!
By a bit, I mean the major influence is in Spanish/French food. West Indian influence is not the predominant factor in creole food.

 
Well, y'all are downplaying the west indian influence because when I eat creole food, I find it incredibly reminiscent. The gumbo, the crab, the beans etc.. It's actually why I like it


We're not downplaying it, it's simply not the main influence in the food. It's a big part, but not the main influence which is French and Spanish. It's still acknowledged as a part of the culture however.

When I've done projects and research on Louisiana Creoles, the French/Spanish influence is predominent. And the west Indian/ native America attributed were contributing factors.

At the end of the day, all the cultures have their own creative additive to the culture as a whole.
 
You're not taking into account that French west indian food also has Spanish influences as well, on top of the African influences. A lot of the New Orleans slaves were brought over from the West Indies, quite a significant amount from Haiti, specifically. How can this not manifest in the food? I have books at home that explain this. And frankly, in Guadeloupe and Martinique, there is also this cultural attitude that sometimes tends to downplay the African influences and elevate the French. That's all part of the dynamics of slavery. All these dishes I mentioned, I can find you some guadeloupean and Haitian equivalents. Of course it's not EXACTLY the same, as you said every mish mash brings its own creative additive. But I'm telling you, the similarities are strong. If one day you go to Guadeloupe or Martinique, you'll figure it out. You can find those similarities in Haitian food as well, but it's more predominant in Guadeloupe/Martinique because they have remained French territory.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 5:04pm
a little bit of historical background that supports this :
 
New Orleans and Haiti were profoundly connected long before their dual disasters. Nowhere else in the US has a longer, deeper relationship with Haiti than New Orleans. Their histories crisscross: Both suffered colonization and enslavement by the Spanish and French. Louisiana even came to be part of the US because of Haiti: France sold the Louisiana Territory - approximately one-third of the current US land mass - to the US in 1803 to recoup some of the financial losses it incurred while trying to defeat the Haitian revolution. (France also wanted to create a “maritime rival,” as Napoleon called it, to England). Blacks, mulattoes, and whites, free and enslaved, moved back and forth between the two places so much that, by 1809, one in two of New Orleans’ inhabitants was from Haiti.[ii] Today, the populations share gene pools and names via the same French, Spanish, and African ancestors.

They have similar cultures, with connections between the music, the living French language and slightly overlapping Creole ones, Carnival and parading (rara, musical troupes in Haitian streets, and the uniquely New Orleans street traditions of second lines and Mardi Gras Indians), Creole food and Creole architecture, and the religion spelled Vodou in Haiti and Voodoo in New Orleans. Both are rich in laid-back and highly interactive communities, and keeping them strong is what underlies a lot of the traditions, like courtyard- and stoop-sitting, ‘speaking to’ your neighbor, and communal street reveling.



Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 5:11pm
Originally posted by goodm3 goodm3 wrote:

Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

cafe du monde 


Last time I went to N.O. this place made my entire trip. 


The lines are always ridiculous!


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 5:17pm
The resistance to historical truth is interesting... I guess that's all I'm gonna say about that. Let the thread go back to being about beignets


Posted By: Flowing-Ice
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 5:18pm
all of the places that were colonized by the french left their mark.

its easy to taste haitian/guadeloupe/new orleans food and get the similarities. 
its a mix of african and french cuisine to different degrees. i don't understand how someone can deny that. 


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 5:18pm
Originally posted by Flowing-Ice Flowing-Ice wrote:

all of the places that were colonized by the french left their mark.

its easy to taste haitian/guadeloupe/new orleans food and get the similarities. 
its a mix of african and french cuisine to different degrees. i don't understand how someone can deny that. 
 
It's as obvious as air. I think it has to do with New Orleans Creoles attaching greater importance to their European roots and not wanting to have an association with the West indies, least of all Haiti


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 6:37pm
Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by Limalady Limalady wrote:

They are African. The pastry style is French though. Y'all don't have to know. My people know what we made, and what White people stole.

Wait, huh?Confused
'Splain!Geek


ETA: Are you saying that they originated from Africa from pastry techniques learned from the French? But how'd they get over here?
 
No. I'm saying that "as I know it," there is an African style beignet (in Nigeria we have something called puff. I don't know what it is in other places). It isn't really a dessert. It is more of a side dish served with stew. No confectioner's sugar. The dessert style pastry is French, so the pastry style dessert is French. It is well-known that the French colonized many parts of Africa, so I'm saying they may have seen a dish and decided to take creative liberties. I'm not trying to down the French. Sorry if this offends you.

LOLNot offended, just confused by your wordingLOL
But if that's the case, what she's asking about is a New Orleans/French thing


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 6:38pm
Originally posted by naturesgift naturesgift wrote:

OMG! why we debating over the orgin of this- does anyone have a actual recipe that is not from a box~ :) like a family recipie with some sort of secrect that they need to PM me... I tried making Nigerian Puff-Puffs and they didnt Puff at all... I need help

You aint gettin family recipes, girl. 
Not unless you family...and you not.Stern Smile


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 6:40pm
Actually, she initially asked for a Nigerian puff puff recipe, which is why the conversation veered the way it did


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 7:25pm
not sure what is being debated, i only skimmed

but I would have worded it as west indian and creole cooking both are heavily influenced by african cuisine

and both are influenced by french/spanish techniques ... maybe creole moreso than west indian (since west indians had more autonomy)


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 7:29pm
Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

not sure what is being debated, i only skimmed

but I would have worded it as west indian and creole cooking both are heavily influenced by african cuisine

and both are influenced by french/spanish techniques ... maybe creole moreso than west indian (since west indians had more autonomy)
 
That's contradictory. Creole is French west indian culture. That's where the word comes from. That's why the native language in Martinique, Guadeloupe and Haiti is called creole. It basically means "métissage" or mixing


Posted By: nycdiva357
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 7:32pm
Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

Originally posted by goodm3 goodm3 wrote:

Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

cafe du monde 


Last time I went to N.O. this place made my entire trip. 


The lines are always ridiculous!


one day.. im going to live w/ southern.. and shes going to take me there.LOL


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 7:35pm
I said techniques!!!

no need to fight me JP ... I agree with you


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 7:39pm
Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

I said techniques!!!

no need to fight me JP ... I agree with you
 
I'm not fighting you. I'm trying to bring a little knowledge to BHM. Even though it sometimes doesn't want it. The American educational system is deeply flawed, to the point that you have people refusing to acknowledge the obvious.
 
As for techniques, Martinique and Guadeloupe are part of France. How would they not be heavily influenced by French cuisine as well? I'm just adding further detail.


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 7:51pm
I said one moreso than the other ... didn't say they weren't influenced (guessimated that west indians might have had more freedom to use they own techniques in the west indies) and I also was speaking about the entire west indies

btw, I was educated in the same country you were!

*tip toes with church finger in the air*



Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:06pm
Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

I said one moreso than the other ... didn't say they weren't influenced (guessimated that west indians might have had more freedom to use they own techniques in the west indies) and I also was speaking about the entire west indies

btw, I was educated in the same country you were!

*tip toes with church finger in the air*

 
Man, just stop with the clowning. This ain't about you. I didn't attack you in any way but if you feel attacked, then that's on you


Posted By: melikey
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:10pm
I dont think anything made from sugar, yeast, and flour is native to Africa.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:11pm
Originally posted by melikey melikey wrote:

I dont think anything made from sugar, yeast, and flour is native to Africa.
 
No, it comes from France. However the deep frying of the beignets is very much African, via the French west indies


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:25pm
trying to lighten things up JP 

it's not that serious ... it's not about either of us then really


Posted By: *Belle*Femme*
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:26pm
was a recipe ever posted in here?

Please send the bat call when its posted.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:29pm
Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

trying to lighten things up JP 

it's not that serious ... it's not about either of us then really
 
Why do you feel the need to lighten things up? My posts are in line with the topic, so I don't know what you're talking about. Especially that you haven't even read the thread. Didn't know you viewed yourself as some kind of BHM arbitrator.


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:29pm

Beignet History:

The word beignet (pronounced bey-YAY) comes from the early Celtic word bigne meaning "to raise." It is also French for "fritter." Beignets, a New Orleans specialty, are fried, raised pieces of yeast dough, usually about 2 inches in diameter or 2 inches square. After being fried, they are sprinkled with sugar or coated with various icings.

Beignets are like a sweet doughnut, but the beignet is square shaped and without a hole. Beignets are considered the forerunners of the raised doughnut. When you hear people in New Orleans say, "Goin'  fo' coffee an' doughnuts," they mean coffee and beignets. Beignet is one of the most universally recognized names for fried dough desserts which are basically fritter batter. For many years, beignets were shaped into balls or squares and covered with mocha frosting. Later the beignet was cut in the shape of a doughnut, and the raised doughnut was born.

Beignets have been associated with Mardi Gras in France since at least the 16th century, and many recipes for beignets appear in French works around the same time. According to Food Historian Cathy Kaufman in her article, Where does the New Orleans’ Mardi Gras Beignet Come From? in the February 2009 Prandial Post:

There is more circumstantial evidence supporting an Andalusian introduction of beignets into Mediterranean France. The Spanish name for yeasted fritters is “buñuelos,” and while I have not traced the etymology of the Spanish term, I would be surprised if it did not share a common root with the Provençal bugne.  Moreover, pets de nonne, deep-fried balls of airy choux paste, were known as “Spanish beignets” in the late Middle Ages, again associating deep-fried dough with Spain. Keeping in mind that Andalusia was under Islamic rule from the eighth until the end of the fifteenth century, many Islamic foods had ample opportunity to be integrated into what has evolved into Spanish cuisine.

Another reason to believe that beignets may have migrated from the Islamic to the Christian worlds is that the deep-frying used to prepare beignets is a relatively expensive technique, requiring a profligate use of fat and preferring metal pans to clay to withstand the high temperatures that the hot fat reaches. Deep-frying thus would have been more typically practiced at the elite end of the spectrum, so that recipes for fritters likely were distributed at the courtly level, only later to be diffused downwards.

The French colonists of the 18th century brought the recipe and custom of making beignets to New Orleans. Some historians believe that the Ursuline Nuns of France, who came to Louisiana in 1727, brought this simple pastry to New Orleans, but this is not based on any facts. According to the 1902 Picayune Creole Cook Book, published by "The Picayune," a leading New Orleans newspaper:

The ancient French colonist brought the custom of serving sweet entrements and eatres, such as Beignets, Compotes, Souffles, Gelees, etc., from the old mother country to Louisiana. The Creoles applied these to the various delightful and refreshing fruits, which abound in Louisiana . . . The custom of serving these sweet entrements spread from New Orleans to other portions of the United States, till now no fastidious chef would think of keeping a fashionable hotel or restaurant with including some of these in the daily bill of fare...


So everyone is right. The end.LOL



Posted By: sbrooke
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:30pm
I went to a African party and they have something that reminds me of bengeits and I told them how us Creole/ southern people have beignets and how they are kinda similar, they had the audacity to laugh and go "wow so yall probably copied us ahahahahha " . They seriously had a kick out of it ........ I was like refraining from saying something smart.


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:35pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

trying to lighten things up JP 

it's not that serious ... it's not about either of us then really
 
Why do you feel the need to lighten things up? My posts are in line with the topic, so I don't know what you're talking about. Especially that you haven't even read the thread. Didn't know you viewed yourself as some kind of BHM arbitrator.

ahhh it's not like that ... I actually chimed in to agree with you




Posted By: soarlikecruz
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:37pm
Originally posted by *Belle*Femme* *Belle*Femme* wrote:

was a recipe ever posted in here?

Please sent the bat call when its posted.



Thiiiss... I'm over here drooling.... I had one in my whole life. Boy... i don't think my taste buds have ever tasted anything so delishCry


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:37pm
Originally posted by carolina cutie carolina cutie wrote:

Beignet History:

The word beignet (pronounced bey-YAY) comes from the early Celtic word bigne meaning "to raise." It is also French for "fritter." Beignets, a New Orleans specialty, are fried, raised pieces of yeast dough, usually about 2 inches in diameter or 2 inches square. After being fried, they are sprinkled with sugar or coated with various icings.

Beignets are like a sweet doughnut, but the beignet is square shaped and without a hole. Beignets are considered the forerunners of the raised doughnut. When you hear people in New Orleans say, "Goin'  fo' coffee an' doughnuts," they mean coffee and beignets. Beignet is one of the most universally recognized names for fried dough desserts which are basically fritter batter. For many years, beignets were shaped into balls or squares and covered with mocha frosting. Later the beignet was cut in the shape of a doughnut, and the raised doughnut was born.

Beignets have been associated with Mardi Gras in France since at least the 16th century, and many recipes for beignets appear in French works around the same time. According to Food Historian Cathy Kaufman in her article, Where does the New Orleans’ Mardi Gras Beignet Come From? in the February 2009 Prandial Post:

There is more circumstantial evidence supporting an Andalusian introduction of beignets into Mediterranean France. The Spanish name for yeasted fritters is “buñuelos,” and while I have not traced the etymology of the Spanish term, I would be surprised if it did not share a common root with the Provençal bugne.  Moreover, pets de nonne, deep-fried balls of airy choux paste, were known as “Spanish beignets” in the late Middle Ages, again associating deep-fried dough with Spain. Keeping in mind that Andalusia was under Islamic rule from the eighth until the end of the fifteenth century, many Islamic foods had ample opportunity to be integrated into what has evolved into Spanish cuisine.

Another reason to believe that beignets may have migrated from the Islamic to the Christian worlds is that the deep-frying used to prepare beignets is a relatively expensive technique, requiring a profligate use of fat and preferring metal pans to clay to withstand the high temperatures that the hot fat reaches. Deep-frying thus would have been more typically practiced at the elite end of the spectrum, so that recipes for fritters likely were distributed at the courtly level, only later to be diffused downwards.

The French colonists of the 18th century brought the recipe and custom of making beignets to New Orleans. Some historians believe that the Ursuline Nuns of France, who came to Louisiana in 1727, brought this simple pastry to New Orleans, but this is not based on any facts. According to the 1902 Picayune Creole Cook Book, published by "The Picayune," a leading New Orleans newspaper:

The ancient French colonist brought the custom of serving sweet entrements and eatres, such as Beignets, Compotes, Souffles, Gelees, etc., from the old mother country to Louisiana. The Creoles applied these to the various delightful and refreshing fruits, which abound in Louisiana . . . The custom of serving these sweet entrements spread from New Orleans to other portions of the United States, till now no fastidious chef would think of keeping a fashionable hotel or restaurant with including some of these in the daily bill of fare...


So everyone is right. The end.LOL

 
True. One little clarification, though: The typically French beignet was not deep-fried in the first place. Spanish fritters are another story. They became deep fried when they collided with African cuisine techniques in the West Indies. When they say "French colonists", they mean the white French colonists who settled in the West Indies, who had slaves who cooked for them who took the beignet and gave it their own slant by frying it. Hence the reason why a beignet in Guadeloupe is nearly identical to a beignet in New Orleans.


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:39pm
Originally posted by melikey melikey wrote:

I dont think anything made from sugar, yeast, and flour is native to Africa.


hmm i wonder where the sugar cane came from.. opps must have came from ye old EuropeStern Smile


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:39pm
Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

trying to lighten things up JP 

it's not that serious ... it's not about either of us then really
 
Why do you feel the need to lighten things up? My posts are in line with the topic, so I don't know what you're talking about. Especially that you haven't even read the thread. Didn't know you viewed yourself as some kind of BHM arbitrator.

ahhh it's not like that ... I actually chimed in to agree with you


 
But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:40pm
I used this one and put spiced it up a bit with nutmeg, allspice, cinnamon, etc, etc .. I made a honey glaze for the cooled ones

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/french-quarter-beignets-recipe/index.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/french-quarter-beignets-recipe/index.html

French Quarter Beignets

 
Ingredients
1 1/2 cups lukewarm water
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 envelope active dry yeast
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 cup evaporated milk
7 cups bread flour
1/4 cup shortening
Nonstick spray
Oil, for deep-frying
3 cups confectioners' sugar
Directions
Mix water, sugar, and yeast in a large bowl and let sit for 10 minutes.

In another bowl, beat the eggs, salt and evaporated milk together. Mix egg mixture to the yeast mixture. In a separate bowl, measure out the bread flour. Add 3 cups of the flour to the yeast mixture and stir to combine. Add the shortening and continue to stir while adding the remaining flour. Remove dough from the bowl, place onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth. Spray a large bowl with nonstick spray. Put dough into the bowl and cover with plastic wrap or a towel. Let rise in a warm place for at least 2 hours.

Preheat oil in a deep-fryer to 350 degrees F.

Add the confectioners' sugar to a paper or plastic bag and set aside.

Roll the dough out to about 1/4-inch thickness and cut into 1-inch squares. Deep-fry, flipping constantly, until they become a golden color. After beignets are fried, drain them for a few seconds on paper towels, and then toss them into the bag of confectioners' sugar. Hold bag closed and shake to coat evenly.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/french-quarter-beignets-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:40pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

trying to lighten things up JP 

it's not that serious ... it's not about either of us then really
 
Why do you feel the need to lighten things up? My posts are in line with the topic, so I don't know what you're talking about. Especially that you haven't even read the thread. Didn't know you viewed yourself as some kind of BHM arbitrator.


because you can get rather intense at times jp... and IA w/ everything you said btw



Posted By: sbrooke
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:41pm
All this talk makes me want to make some tonight lol.


Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:41pm
I wanna try one.
Does it taste a little like elephant ears?


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:41pm
Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 

Lamp


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:42pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:43pm
Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

I wanna try one.
Does it taste like a little elephant ear?

LOLNo. It tastes kind of like a light, unglazed doughnut.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:46pm
Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 
 
They only come off as aggressive because some people have an aversion to the fact that New Orleans cuisine is strongly African/west indian rooted. Had I made the argument that New Orleans cuisine is also strongly French rooted, no one would think of my posts as aggressive, as I am simply discussing the origins of food.
 
I guess if I'd found some literature saying that the food is mostly influenced by Navajo injuns, everybody would be fine with it.


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:46pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 
 
They only come off as aggressive because some people have an aversion to the fact that New Orleans cuisine is strongly African/west indian rooted. Had I made the argument that New Orleans cuisine is also strongly French rooted, no one would think of my posts as aggressive, as I am simply discussing the origins of food.


Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:47pm
Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

I wanna try one.
Does it taste like a little elephant ear?


LOLNo. It tastes kind of like a light, unglazed doughnut.


Lol but that's how elephant ears taste to me.
You know what I'm talking about Skittles the fried dough they have at fairs and festivals.


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:50pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 
 
They only come off as aggressive because some people have an aversion to the fact that New Orleans cuisine is strongly African/west indian rooted. Had I made the argument that New Orleans cuisine is also strongly French rooted, no one would think of my posts as aggressive, as I am simply discussing the origins of food.

Nooooope.

I agree with you, but every time I read your post I imagine you gritting your teeth and sweating bullets as you type. And Im not just talking about this thread either. There have been very few times that I've read your posts and havent wondered why you were going so hard. 


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:51pm
Originally posted by f8dagrate f8dagrate wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 
 
They only come off as aggressive because some people have an aversion to the fact that New Orleans cuisine is strongly African/west indian rooted. Had I made the argument that New Orleans cuisine is also strongly French rooted, no one would think of my posts as aggressive, as I am simply discussing the origins of food.
 
Funny reaction for an African. I'm sorry to bore you. I apologize. New Orleans food is purely français and espanol. Niccas have nothing to do with it. Does it make you feel better now?


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:51pm
Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 
 
They only come off as aggressive because some people have an aversion to the fact that New Orleans cuisine is strongly African/west indian rooted. Had I made the argument that New Orleans cuisine is also strongly French rooted, no one would think of my posts as aggressive, as I am simply discussing the origins of food.

Nooooope.

I agree with you, but every time I read your post I imagine you gritting your teeth and sweating bullets as you type. And Im not just talking about this thread either. There have been very few times that I've read your posts and havent wondered why you were going so hard. 


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:52pm
Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

I wanna try one.
Does it taste like a little elephant ear?


LOLNo. It tastes kind of like a light, unglazed doughnut.
 

Lol but that's how elephant ears taste to me.
You know what I'm talking about Skittles the fried dough they have at fairs and festivals.

Do you mean funnel cakes?


If so, just imagine them being fluffier, heavier and softer.


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:53pm
are elephant ears made with yeast?

I find beignets lighter but it could be the shape, since it's flat 

I like elephant ears




Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:53pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by f8dagrate f8dagrate wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

[QUOTE=**Sk!TtLeS B**][QUOTE=JoliePoufiasse]
B

 
Funny reaction for an African. I'm sorry to bore you. I apologize. New Orleans food is purely français and espanol. Niccas have nothing to do with it. Does it make you feel better now?


I guess you missed my comment that said " IA w/ everything you said... it's the way you say things jp. but i can understand your frustration at times.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:53pm
Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 
 
They only come off as aggressive because some people have an aversion to the fact that New Orleans cuisine is strongly African/west indian rooted. Had I made the argument that New Orleans cuisine is also strongly French rooted, no one would think of my posts as aggressive, as I am simply discussing the origins of food.

Nooooope.

I agree with you, but every time I read your post I imagine you gritting your teeth and sweating bullets as you type. And Im not just talking about this thread either. There have been very few times that I've read your posts and havent wondered why you were going so hard. 
 
Yes, I've heard that before. this is not the first time I raise the issue and I'm astounded that despite all the factual evidence I provide, people are intent on wanting to distance themselves from the west indian African connection. It does get a little irritating with some cooning undertones. But then again, 2 years ago, BHM hardly knew anything that had to do with anything outside its borders and people used phrases like "African booty scratcher", so I guess there's evolution.


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:55pm
Originally posted by f8dagrate f8dagrate wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:


But then, I just added a detail to clarify my thoughts and you're acting like I'm attacking you and you somehow need to diffuse a situation. That's is kind of odd.


Most of your posts come off as unnecessarily aggressive. 
 
They only come off as aggressive because some people have an aversion to the fact that New Orleans cuisine is strongly African/west indian rooted. Had I made the argument that New Orleans cuisine is also strongly French rooted, no one would think of my posts as aggressive, as I am simply discussing the origins of food.

Nooooope.

I agree with you, but every time I read your post I imagine you gritting your teeth and sweating bullets as you type. And Im not just talking about this thread either. There have been very few times that I've read your posts and havent wondered why you were going so hard. 
 
I don't punch my computer. I read books and I eat.


Posted By: **Sk!TtLeS B**
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:56pm
umm...ok


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:56pm
many people agreed with you JP!  there is an the african connection!




Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:57pm
Yep Skittles I should like them then.
I think Funnel cakes and elephant ears are the same but elephant ears shaped different like bumpy irregular circles



Yep yeast is an ingredient Ricky.

Ok I want to try a beignet now


Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:57pm
nobody is really talking about the origins anymore...


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:58pm

yes you'll love beignets jonesie




Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 8:59pm
Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

many people agreed with you JP!  there is an the african connection!


 
Then this is not directed at those who already know. This is directed at those who don't. People have stated that beignets were purely French. I simply explained why they are not. Why is this aggressive? I have to assume that's because some people don't like the factual answer to make that assumption.


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:00pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

many people agreed with you JP!  there is an the african connection!


 
Then this is not directed at those who already know. This is directed at those who don't. People have stated that beignets were purely French. I simply explained why they are not. Why is this aggressive? I have to assume that's because some people don't like the factual answer to make that assumption.


jp you like to argue a lot huh?


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:01pm
Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

nobody is really talking about the origins anymore...
 
Read the initial post. There is a reason that the conversation veered towards this. Besides, so far nobody wants to post a damn recipe anyway...


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:03pm
Originally posted by f8dagrate f8dagrate wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

many people agreed with you JP!  there is an the african connection!


 
Then this is not directed at those who already know. This is directed at those who don't. People have stated that beignets were purely French. I simply explained why they are not. Why is this aggressive? I have to assume that's because some people don't like the factual answer to make that assumption.


jp you like to argue a lot huh?
 
I like anything that has to do with black history and culture. OP started by saying that she had heard that beignets had an African connection. I expounded on that. It's a black forum. What's wrong with raising the point? What sensibilities am I offending by doing so?


Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:03pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

nobody is really talking about the origins anymore...
 
Read the initial post. There is a reason that the conversation veered towards this. Besides, so far nobody wants to post a damn recipe anyway...


Posted By: carolina cutie
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:03pm
Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

Originally posted by **Sk!TtLeS B** **Sk!TtLeS B** wrote:

Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

I wanna try one.
Does it taste like a little elephant ear?


LOLNo. It tastes kind of like a light, unglazed doughnut.
 

Lol but that's how elephant ears taste to me.
You know what I'm talking about Skittles the fried dough they have at fairs and festivals.

Do you mean funnel cakes?


If so, just imagine them being fluffier, heavier and softer.
Big smile Real unclassy talk, I'll cut a bish for a funel cake. No fruit is necessary, just give me fried dough and powder sugar.


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:04pm
@cc what about w/ icecreamTongue


Posted By: jonesable
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:05pm
Yyyyeeesss CC!


Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:06pm
Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

nobody is really talking about the origins anymore...
 
Read the initial post. There is a reason that the conversation veered towards this. Besides, so far nobody wants to post a damn recipe anyway...
 
and several posts afterwards. I didn't make this up. The main point of the op was to obtain a recipe that no one posted. So what's your point?


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:06pm
red velvet




Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:06pm








Posted By: Flowing-Ice
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:07pm
Originally posted by jonesable jonesable wrote:

Yep Skittles I should like them then.
I think Funnel cakes and elephant ears are the same but elephant ears shaped different like bumpy irregular circles



Yep yeast is an ingredient Ricky.

Ok I want to try a beignet now

i love these effing things. omg. elephant ears, i don't mind getting covered in powder for. 


Posted By: f8dagrate
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:07pm
Originally posted by ms_wonderland ms_wonderland wrote:

i really thought this was about a man catching bayonets(the weapon) with his hands.


LOL


Posted By: ms_wonderland
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:07pm
i really thought this was about a man catching bayonets(the weapon) with his hands.


Posted By: SoutherNtellect
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:08pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by SoutherNtellect SoutherNtellect wrote:

nobody is really talking about the origins anymore...
 
Read the initial post. There is a reason that the conversation veered towards this. Besides, so far nobody wants to post a damn recipe anyway...
 
and several posts afterwards. I didn't make this up. The main point of the op was to obtain a recipe that no one posted. So what's your point?

it's gonna fly over your head anyway. don't worry about it 


Posted By: rickysrose
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:09pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

many people agreed with you JP!  there is an the african connection!


 
Then this is not directed at those who already know. This is directed at those who don't. People have stated that beignets were purely French. I simply explained why they are not. Why is this aggressive? I have to assume that's because some people don't like the factual answer to make that assumption.

you went in on a deeply flawed american education, basically called bhm (the people you are talking to) uncultured bigots, called "bhm" out on coonish undertones

you accused me of being a bhm arbitrator plus whatever else ... when I basically agreed with you!

this is not fighting or going in material ... anyways let's drop it, there's no room for vex, we are talking about carbs, cholestrol and hot fat ... let's get happy LOL




Posted By: JoliePoufiasse
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:10pm
Originally posted by rickysrose rickysrose wrote:

you went in on a deeply flawed american education, basically called bhm (the people you are talking to) uncultured bigots, called "bhm" out on coonish undertones

you accused me of being a bhm arbitrator plus whatever else ... when I basically agreed with you!

this is not fighting or going in material ... anyways let's drop it, there's no room for vex, we are talking about carbs, cholestrol and hot fat ... let's get happy LOL





 
I'm dropping it. But don't act coy. I said these things in response to YOU, when YOU said that I was attacking YOU by expounding on the origins of the damn beignet! So quit your bullshyt. At least, be honest. You are being highly hypocritical right now


Posted By: Flowing-Ice
Date Posted: May 09 2013 at 9:12pm
i don't like funnel cake as much as i like elephant ears though. 
i also really like chinese donuts. so yummy. 



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