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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mixer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 12:56am
Oh BHM...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Alias_Avi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 1:26am
Oh you silly people

Don't you know that "positive stereotypes" are on the opposite side of the same coin as negative ones

They work both for and against "minorities". Stereotypes only benefit one group wholesale, the White one
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote Mixer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 1:35am
Originally posted by Alias_Avi Alias_Avi wrote:

Oh you silly people

Don't you know that "positive stereotypes" are on the opposite side of the same coin as negative ones

They work both for and against "minorities". Stereotypes only benefit one group wholesale, the White one
Did you just say what I said but smarter?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (9) Thanks(9)   Quote bunzaveli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 1:37am

People/cops Assumed I Was A Criminal Because I'm Black



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote BBpants Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 1:52am
Originally posted by Mixer Mixer wrote:

Originally posted by Alias_Avi Alias_Avi wrote:

Oh you silly people

Don't you know that "positive stereotypes" are on the opposite side of the same coin as negative ones

They work both for and against "minorities". Stereotypes only benefit one group wholesale, the White one
Did you just say what I said but smarter?

Is the sky blue?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Alias_Avi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 1:59am

Originally posted by <a href=http://www.racefiles.com/author/scot/ target=_blank rel=nofollow>S</a><a href=http://www.racefiles.com/author/scot/ target=_blank rel=nofollow>cot Nakagawa</a> Scot Nakagawa wrote:


The Problem With Asian American Racial Privilege

February 5, 2014 1:30 am

Asian diversity image

If you do a google search of “Asian privilege” you’ll see that the subject is generating a lot of chatter, both on the right and the left. But, much of the online discussion concerning Asian privilege ignores a couple of really important things.

First, “race” is a political category, invented to serve the interests of white supremacy. Second,  the Oriental “race” (what we were called before we became Asian) was conceived of in this context. When you consider these facts, it becomes clear that Asian privilege may be more complicated than we imagine.

On the first point, race is neither biological nor cultural. In the words of Northwestern University Law Professor, Dorothy Roberts, “Race is not a biological category that is politically charged. It is a political category that has been disguised as a biological one.”

And politics has consequences. It is through our political system that the rules of society are made, and by those rules that the wealth of society is distributed.

So when we talk about Asian Americans, we’re talking about a subjugated political category as much as we’re talking about the people that category tries to contain. We aren’t all alike and don’t all fit together. In fact, Asian America includes ethnic groups that are among the most successful in terms of income, and groups that are among the most unsuccessful by that same measure. Even most so-called Asians don’t identify as such, preferring instead to identify by ethnicity.

Add the notion of privilege to all of this and things get even more complicated. Why? Because privilege doesn’t necessarily equate to real political power, and not all privileges are racial. On the other hand, privileges that don’t start out racial often get concentrated in ways that benefit certain racial groups because of the very real political power of race.

Confused yet? Here’s what I mean.

Many Asian immigrants come to the U.S. on special visas that are granted to those who have skills the U.S. is short on. For instance, South Asian Americans include a disproportionate number of doctors, specifically because the U.S. didn’t have enough doctors to serve the new market for health care created by medicare and recruited them from South Asia. Today, many Taiwanese are being recruited to address shortages of workers qualified for high wage jobs in the tech sector. This kind of targeted recruitment skews statistics concerning Asian educational attainment and income upward, creating the impression that Asian Americans as a whole have a racial advantage that results in a disproportionate number of us becoming doctors and other high wage workers.

But the first wave of South Asian doctors, like the current wave of Taiwanese tech workers, weren’t educated in the U.S., and not all Asians come here on special visas. Some of us arrive as impoverished undocumented immigrants, and others as war refugees. The apparent race privilege indicated by the median incomes and educational levels of Asians overall is about as relevant to these groups as the high median family income of whites is to white people living in the abandoned coal camps of Appalachia.

Moreover, while special visas are certainly a form of privilege, Asians aren’t getting them because they’re Asian. They’re getting them because they have skills U.S. industries aren’t finding enough of at home. There’s a difference.

But the privilege of getting a special visa is undeniable. And in a society organized by race, concentrating that privilege among some Asians makes a difference to all of us because it contributes to the stereotype of Asians as model workers and citizens. And, as dehumanizing as it may be, this kind of model minority stereotyping is a form of privilege in the context of racism, which is nothing more than the logic of race.

I know some Asian Americans are uncomfortable with that idea, but the privilege of model minority stereotyping is made evident when you consider the obvious disadvantage of being labeled a “problem” minority. This disadvantage is represented in the racially skewed composition of our prisons and the widespread practice of targeting of black men for petty crimes like marijuana use that are committed just as frequently by whites, who also present the problem of constituting a much larger percentage of the illegal marijuana market.

That privilege may not benefit us all equally, but even white privilege doesn’t benefit all white people equally (I again offer those white Appalachians for your consideration). People with the power to confer privilege tend to do so in order to concentrate benefits for themselves, so most of what is gained through racial stereotyping isn’t really being spread around, and even to the extent that it is, the distribution is hardly even. Moreover, in the case of Asian Americans, that privilege is conferred upon us by whites, making Asian privilege a form of conditional white privilege.

So, as we argue over Asian privilege, we should keep in mind that Asian is less effective as a descriptor of people as it is of a political category created to serve the interests of white supremacy. And because the Asian political category is a subjugated one by definition, just like special visas granted to address labor shortages, Asian privilege can be revoked if we don’t play by the rules.



lol @ Mixer


Edited by Alias_Avi - Feb 25 2014 at 2:00am

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Alias_Avi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 2:02am
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The Origins of the Asian American Model Minority Myth

color of success

Historian Ellen Wu’s The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority just might be the best examination of the roots of the model minority stereotype in print.

More than just a connect-the-dots documentation of the rise of the model minority myth, The Color of Success succeeds at putting the myth in a much broader social and political context, positioning the model minority as a critical, even necessary, lever of white supremacy, resting upon and taking drawing its power from the fulcrum of anti-black racism. What’s more, it succeeds at making this history feel personal and present in contemporary social relations. For me, a person who lived through or in the immediate aftermath of the events documented in the book, The Color of Success felt like a piece of personal history.

During the 1960s, the formative years of my youth, model minority myth making was so ubiquitous that nearly everyone around me, and most especially Asian Americans, just accepted it as the truth. No doubt the enthusiasm among many Asian Americans to accept model minority stereotyping was a reflection of the fact that the menu of choices where stereotypes were concerned appeared to be restricted to either “model minority” or “yellow peril.” And the stakes were high. The “yellow peril” stereotype had been used to justify wars in Korea and Vietnam, the mass internment of Japanese Americans during WWII,  anti-communist persecution of Chinese Americans under the McCarran Act, and no small amount of racial exclusion and terrorism.

Growing up in Hawai’i only made matters worse. I didn’t just see the telecasts from Vietnam on TV, I lived in the staging site for that war, surrounded on all sides by military bases full of soldiers who looked at us like we were every bit as much the enemy as the Viet Cong. Moreover, winning statehood for Hawai’i’ in 1959, just a few years before I was born, required no small amount of myth making concerning Hawai’i's “Asiatic majority,” not to mention the intentional marginalization of Native Hawaiians for whom statehood was yet another demoralizing chapter in a centuries long history of illegal and near genocidal colonial domination.

In order to assuage racist fears of a yellow peril takeover of (white) American culture and politics, statehood advocates presented Asian Hawai’i residents as bi-cultural brokers between east and west who were, nonetheless, as American as pizza and chop suey, and ironically equipped by our indelibly foreign cultures to be ideal Americans. The contradictions, though obvious, were mostly ignored, not just by white Americans but by many Asians.

The Color of Success provides a detailed account of where all of that confusing, contradictory, and ultimately dehumanizing myth making came from. It presents a critical swath of Asian American history, from WWII through the 1970s, during which some Japanese and Chinese American leaders tried to secure citizenship for members of their communities by engaging in P.R. campaigns and sponsoring  research designed to convince the public that they, and by extension Asians in general, were less prone to delinquency and promiscuity, and more committed to family, education, and country than others by dint of culture. Japanese Americans in particular were so successful in this effort that by the 1980s, during the U.S.-Japan auto wars, the notion that Japanese culture made adherents better, more industrious workers, especially on mass production lines, inspired a craze for all things Japanese, from ancient samurai codes to flower arranging.

But the model minority stereotype had a downside. The myth of the model minority painted Asians as decidedly not black in the American mind, inadvertently promoting the idea that blacks were Asian Americans’ opposites; a “problem minority,” spoiling the American dream by refusing to simply ignore racism and quietly pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Today, the myth is more popular than ever, and as important to the reproduction of racial injustice in the 21st century as the 19th century “rags to riches” novels of Horatio Alger were to the suppression of dissent against extreme gilded age class exploitation and 1% excesses in the beginning of the 20th century.

This book is a must-read for all who are interested in Asian American history, critical race theory, and the roots of color blind racism in the U.S.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mixer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 2:03am
Originally posted by BBpants BBpants wrote:

Originally posted by Mixer Mixer wrote:

Originally posted by Alias_Avi Alias_Avi wrote:

Oh you silly people

Don't you know that "positive stereotypes" are on the opposite side of the same coin as negative ones

They work both for and against "minorities". Stereotypes only benefit one group wholesale, the White one
Did you just say what I said but smarter?

Is the sky blue?
Yes it is. I see Naruto marathons made you forget the sky color again. Go get some sunshine.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mixer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 2:05am
Alias, you really did break it down well.Sleepy As for BHM, oh boy...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote BBpants Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2014 at 2:14am
Originally posted by Mixer Mixer wrote:

Originally posted by BBpants BBpants wrote:

Originally posted by Mixer Mixer wrote:

Originally posted by Alias_Avi Alias_Avi wrote:

Oh you silly people

Don't you know that "positive stereotypes" are on the opposite side of the same coin as negative ones

They work both for and against "minorities". Stereotypes only benefit one group wholesale, the White one
Did you just say what I said but smarter?

Is the sky blue?
Yes it is. I see Naruto marathons made you forget the sky color again. Go get some sunshine.

Says the negro who lived in the porn basement lol




Edited by BBpants - Feb 25 2014 at 2:15am
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