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kfoxx1998 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 10:44am
Okay tatee.  I'm going to scan it too cause I'm in reading mode today.

I'm getting to the evolution of nappy now.  It almost seems like white people didn't even mean anything negative when they started to use this wordConfused

They started with thinking it looked like wool, which is cloth, "nap" being a fuzzy texture.  This was the best way they could think of it to describe our hair not seeing our curl patterns because slaves were so disheveled when they arrived and had no way to groom themselves.  In Africa they had beautiful curls the way we see ours today because of their hair care.   This is blowing my mind.  Thanks for the great topic. 

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blaquefoxx View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 10:46am
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


stopped saying nappy yearsssss ago
This...
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kfoxx1998 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 10:52am
And I can't find other good sources about "nappy hair" quickly so if you have time look at this wikipedia article.  Its actually pretty good although even Wikipedia redirects to "afro-textured" when you type in nappy hairTongue.   If you find a paper post it for me please!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afro-textured_hair

Very interesting and give examples of what I mean above showing the evolution of our hair journey and how it related to the transatlantic trade vs. in Africa.  I'm a bit impressedLOL

Excerpt for now:

Diasporic Africans in the Americas have been experimenting with ways to style their hair since their arrival in the Western Hemisphere well before the 19th century. During the approximately 400 years of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade that forcibly extracted over 20 million people from their indigenous homes, chaining them to sell as human capital, the beauty ideals pertaining to their own natural hair changed drastically. The visibility, and pride, seen in pre-colonial Africa regarding the afro-hair texture became sparse. Imported slaves were mostly young, generally between the ages of 10 and 24. Upon arrival to the Americas, slaves lacked the skills, tools and ability to meet local aesthetic standards. The issue was most particular to women. Furthermore, there was no time for hair grooming as slave masters worked their subjects 12–15 hours a day, 7 days a week. The barbaric and desperate social climate left slaves with little concern for grooming and personal well-being. The carefully crafted combs and tools available for hair grooming in their homeland were no where to be found in the new world. American slaves wore matted and tangled locks, instead of the well maintained, long, thick and healthy tresses worn by their brethren left in Africa.

To resolve this, slaves began using sheep fleece carding tools to detangle their hair which resulted in widespread scalp diseases such as lice and dandruff. Slaves invented remedies for disinfecting and cleansing their scalp such as applying kerosine or cornmeal directly on the scalp with a cloth as they carefully parted through the hair. In the fields, male slaves shaved their hair and wore hats to protect their scalps against the sun; female slaves wore scarves and handkerchiefs. The aesthetic norm for house slaves was to appear neat and clean. The men sometimes wore wigs mimicking their white masters, and even wore hairstyles resembling theirs, while the women plaited and braided their hair. Women with long and/or wavy hair were prone to becoming objects of jealousy by the master's wife and were often forced to cut their hair, making them look less feminine.

When the 19th century arrived, new laws were passed that enabled slaves to set aside Sunday as a day for attending church, socializing, and styling each other's hair. The women, who wore their hair bound in cotton rollers all week, would remove their scarves, allowing their curls to hang past their shoulders. With more time to spend on hair grooming, slaves further invented and evolved their techniques. Men began using axle grease to straighten and dye their hair. Cooking grease such as lard, butter, and goose grease were used to moisturize the hair. A hot butter knife was sometimes used, afterwards, by female slaves to add curls to their locks.

Overloaded with the suggestion that straight hair was more acceptable than natural, kinky/curly hair textures, slaves and freedmen began exploring solutions for straightening, or relaxing, their tresses. One toxic solution was a mixture of lye and potato which burned the scalp upon contact. Among whites and African-Americans alike, those with lighter skin and 'straighter' hair textures were better embraced socially, and were offered the luxury of upward mobility. Afro-textured hair was often referred to as 'wool', along with darker skin tones, this physical characteristic was generally seen as something bad that 'needed to be fixed'. During the mid-19th century afro-textured hair was basically outlawed in New Orleans. While in public, African-American women with kinkier hair textures were to cover their hair with a scarf.

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tatee View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 10:54am
Originally posted by blaquefoxx blaquefoxx wrote:

Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


stopped saying nappy yearsssss ago
This...


you wanna tell us why?
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kfoxx1998 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 11:04am
lol cherry.

It makes sense after I looked further.  Nap = cloth = cloth diaper.  I get it.  US and UK at least from what I know stay making words sound more clever or shorter and messing everything up, confusing meLOL

And we know the UK is where all those colonist came from in the first place so there you have it.    Another way of saying fuzzy cloth or wool.


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 11:05am
Regarding the article, we as women wore scarves/head-wraps waaaaay before we got here. It irks me when people associate head-wraps with slaves and or "aunt jememima". Even in our lowest state we still tried to maintain some sense of normalcy/identity.

@ Tatee, the term nappy always seemed so negative to me. I may have to blame society and my peers for that.



kinky (adj.) Look up kinky at Dictionary.com
1844, "full of kinks, twisted, curly," from kink + -y (2). Meaning "odd, eccentric, crotchety" is from 1859
nappy (adj.) Look up nappy at Dictionary.com
"downy," late 15c., from nap (n.1) + -y (2). Meaning "fuzzy, kinky," used in colloquial or derogatory reference to the hair of black people, is from 1950.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 11:05am


Summary
This book is fashioned after the call-and-response form of storytelling created by the slaves in the 1800s. Brenda, a young black girl, has VERY kinky hair, and her Uncle Mordecai comments on it. He compares it to many things (the desert, snow), then asks if she’s ashamed. She says no, she’s beautiful, and the only girl who knows how to talk right (in the King’s English). She talks about how she got her hair from God because He wanted nappy hair on earth, how her ancestors had hair like that and came over with slavery, and that God says her hair is the only perfect circle in nature.

Interpretation
The book sets itself apart from other children’s books because of its form: the call and response. As Carolivia Herron explains on her website :

“The Nappy Hair story is like a praise song from West Africa. In a praise song the poet or "griot" (say 'gree-oh') praises the chief or leader of the people. Although the song is supposed to be all praise, sometimes the griot tries to find a way to tell the chief how to improve.”

Uncle Mordecai is the griot in Nappy Hair and the audience’s response is indicated by its bolder typeface and paragraph indentation. This form lends itself well to being read out loud, especially in dialogue form, but conversely is not as successful when it isn’t spoken.

The history of this book has been surrounded by controversy. In September of 1998, Ruth Sherman, a white 3rd grade teacher at P.S. 75 in Brooklyn, New York, decided to teach the book Nappy Hair to her students. Her lesson endeavored to teach racial tolerance and acceptance to her mostly Black and Hispanic students. The students loved the book, and eagerly asked for more copies of the book to carry around. Ms. Sherman made copies of different pages in the book, which were discovered two months later by a parent. The parent was offended by the material, and began distributing pages from the book with demeaning racial commentary about Ms. Sherman in the margin. This event snowballed into more and more outrage in the community, until the school board was forced to hold an inquiry about the lesson plan. Ms. Sherman was found innocent of all wrongdoing, but was afraid for her safety and transferred to another school. Carolivia Herron fully supported Sherman’s use of the book in her classroom, saying that it was consistent with the message of affirmation of unique black characteristics that she was trying to accomplish in the book. For news articles about the controversy, visit Carolivia Herron’s website page about the controversy or adversity.net’s website about the book

http://www.umich.edu/~childlit/Nappy_Hair/Nappyframeset1.htm
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kfoxx1998 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 11:09am
Originally posted by blaquefoxx blaquefoxx wrote:

Regarding the article, we as women wore scarves/head-wraps waaaaay before we got here. It irks me when people associate head-wraps with slaves and or "aunt jememima". Even in our lowest state we still tried to maintain some sense of normalcy/identity.


Yes.  They were so fascinated like it was an American invention. 

The only reason they never saw these things from jump is because of the conditions that they created.  It sounds like it took a while for the slaves to "normalize" their lives after the crossing.  Who cares about doing their hair when half of them wouldn't even survive the trip.  So sad when you think about it.


Edited by kfoxx1998 - Jul 26 2013 at 11:09am
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 11:22am
Aww man tatee.  It sounds like that was a blowback from our own negative connotation of the word.  I see what the teacher was trying to do but she was in the danger zone.  It would have been better receive by the parents I think from a black teacher?

This made me think of my son who is an altogether different generation.  He loves nothing more than going to school with the biggest afro on the planet.  It drives dad crazy but I encourage him, he loves his hair and his friends go crazy like "cool".  He has this one mixed friend and his mom keeps his hair brushcut because she doesn't know how to do it.  He is the one who absolutely wants that afro badLOL!  They are 9 now and I can't wait to see the two of them at 18.  I suspect they will be the opposite. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 26 2013 at 1:09pm
Happy to be nappy.
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