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MY JOURNEY TO BETTER SKIN CARE

 
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Benni View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 15 2013 at 12:57am
Quote from SKINTRIUM

How to Lighten Skin the Natural Way

At the base of beautiful, glowing and radiant skin is health. While you can certainly use moisturizers, skin creams, makeup and other products on your skin to improve its appearance, if your skin isn’t healthy, it simply won’t look healthy – and that’s the bottom line.

Skin whitening and lightening products have become all the rage in the world of skincare, and while these products are certainly useful, healthy skin is the key to enjoying the best possible outcome of skin lightening and whitening. Wondering how to effectively lighten your skin? Instead of automatically reaching for a bottle of skin lightening cream to enhance your appearance, first try these natural methods to skin lightening.

Avoid Excessive Sun Exposure: If you want to lighten the tone of your skin, you are going to want to stay out of the sun as much as possible. As you already know, the sun naturally alters the pigment of the skin, making it appear darker. The more you expose yourself to the sun, the darker your skin will appear. So, avoid the sun as much as possible, and when you are exposed, make sure to wear long sleeves and pants, as well as an SPF of 30 or above.

Cleanse Regularly: From smog to dirt, you are exposed to environmental pollutants each and every day. These pollutants can build up over time and give your skin a darker appearance. Thoroughly cleanse your skin each and every day with mild soaps, scrubs and toners in order to wash away that build up of dirt; you will be surprised by how much lighter and brighter your skin will be.


[BEat Right: You are what you eat, or so they say; but there is some truth in that statement. What you eat does have an effect on the appearance of your skin. Eat lots of junk food and your skin will suffer. In order to improve the look of your skin, start eating right. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables will certainly impact the appearance of your skin.

Use Milk: Milk; it does a body good – and not just by drinking it, but by applying to the skin, as well. Milk is a natural skin bleacher, so take milk baths or wipe it on with a cloth. Allow the milk to soak your skin for five to 10 minutes and follow your soak with a good cleanse. Do this three times a week and you’ll notice a difference in the brightness of your skin.

Exfoliate: As was previously mentioned, your skin is exposed to environmental pollutants every day, and those pollutants certainly build up. On top of that, you naturally shed millions of skin cells each and every day, which also builds up on the surface of your skin. While cleansing certainly helps to remove dirt and dead skin cells, exfoliating will really help to remove that build up.

While a skin lightening or whitening cream can certainly help to improve your complexion, these skin lightening techniques will leave you with healthy, more radiant and youthful looking skin naturally.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 15 2013 at 7:17pm
Today I was supposed to do Salt Water Bath , but with temps here near 80 degrees today, there was no way I will be sitting in a bath tub. So ventured off to Whole Foods for Sea Salt Soap, so I picked up 2 bars of unwrapped soap, but almost passed out at the checkout...$23.80/lb . NO BUENO !! I was too to say I did not want it, so I paid the $12+ for it, fortunately they only weighed 52 ounces NO MAS!!. I needed to get something to prepare for my Peel tomorrow. My skin feels pretty much the same as last night after using Dudu Osun. I know these soaps have totally different purposes, I could not help making the comparison.
Looking forward to 'Peel Day', and hoping for another warm day


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Pamper Your Skin

From BULK APOTHECARY
by Danielle Sims

Years ago I found out how incredible easy it is to make lotion. It is so inexpensive and organic that I wondered why anyone would even consider spending a dime on the chemical rich lotions on the market.

Besides I had an added incentive, I have eczema, so I am extremely sensitive to what I put on my skin. Making my own lotion was a great alternative for me.

To begin, for a lotion base all you need is water, oil and an emulsifier. An emulsifier is simply an ingredient that blends the water and oil together.

Here is the base that I begin with to make my lotion:

•½ cup distilled water
•½ cup oil (I usually use olive, almond, macadamia nut, or grape seed) 1 TBS liquid lecithin

You can experiment from here by adding essential oils, combining other oils; you can steep beneficial herbs into your water before you add your oil, etc. . .

Here is a nice winter lotion to get you started:

•½ cup distilled water
•½ cup olive oil
•1 TBS lecithin
•6-8 drops of geranium oil
•2-4 drops Myrrh oil
•400 IU Vitamin E oil (1-2 open capsules)

Geranium oil is good for supporting balance and rejuvenating dry skin conditions and for wrinkled and matured skin. Myrrh is a gentle oil that is effective in replenishing moisture.

Vitamin E oil is an excellent antioxidant and helps to protect the skin as well as a nice preservative.

Blend all ingredients in the blender either on whip or cream. You will have a nice creamy firm lotion. Add more water to make a lighter lotion. Store in the refrigerator in hot climates or store in a cool place. Shake well before use.

Enjoy your lotion. Hopefully this little recipe will inspire you to become creative!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 16 2013 at 7:38pm
Okay, I was a bit put off by having to pay more than expected for Dead Sea Salt Soap yesterday, but am happy about it today. It did get rid of a lot of dead skin. Could not believe the difference in my complexion this morning. It's a trade off I can live with because it's worth not having to sit in a Tub for 20-30 minutes.
Peel went well. I showered with DSS soap prior to the peel. Should have a great lip peel tomorrow, because I felt it. Face and Neck tolerated LA for 4.5 minutes.






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 16 2013 at 9:28pm
MUST READ Vitamin C for Skin Whitening and NOT Glutathione
Disclaimer:
Please seek doctor's advice before taking any supplements.

KIKAYSIKAT BLOG

For those who have been following my blog, you may have noticed that I am an avid fan and reviewer of glutathione supplements for skin lightening. It's also been a while since I last reviewed a certain brand and do you want to know why? Last year, I crossed over an article over the internet that states Vitamin C is enough for skin lightening and taking glutathione internally makes no difference at all.

Before posting the article and sharing it to you immediately I decided to experiment and try it on my own for a few months. That is approximately 6 months ago. And you know what? IT works. Vitamin C alone is enough to lighten the skin. Making me realize, better too late than never, that glutathione supplements are a marketing ploy to rip us off our money.

Isn't it odd that it's always emphasized that you have to intake twice as much vitamin C for each 500mg glutathione you take, and that you take it in separate doses (3x spread out). Taking vitamin C on its own has no negative sideffects except maybe when too much it can cause diarrhea. You can try stopping the glutathione supplements and take Vitamin C on its own instead and see that it CAN LIGHTEN your skin just the same.

Not only does it save you a lot of money since glutathione supplements are quite expensive but it also serves as its main purpose. An anti-oxidant.

Here's the link to the article that I've mentioned. Here's the article itself. It's a long read but WORTH it:

- In healthy adults, Vitamin C raises glutathione levels in the red blood cells and lymphocytes.
- Glutathione helps determine the balance of light and dark pigments (pheomelanin and eumelanin) in our skin. L-cysteine and the TYRP1 enzyme also play a part in this balance. (Not to get confused with the glutathione pills, which are ineffective in lightening the skin. But, the Glutathione that our bodies naturally produce).

* Taking high doses of Vitamin C (1,000 – 3,000 mgs) can help to lighten skin over time.Since you’re reading this page, you’ve probably already asked yourself: can taking Vitamin C really lighten your skin? The short answer is: Yes, it can. But how exactly does Vitamin C help lighten our skin? The answer to that question is a bit longer, but reading on will be worth it in the end (I promise!). If you don’t have the time to read about just how taking high doses of Vitamin C can lighten your skin, just bookmark this page to read later.

What is Vitamin C?

Before I go on to explain what Vitamin C has to do with our skin color, I think it’s important to know just what Vitamin C is first. Vitamin C (also called Ascorbic Acid) is a water-soluble vitamin, and is needed by our bodies to form collagen in bones, cartilage, muscle and blood vessels. We get Vitamin C from fruits and vegetables, particularly citrus fruits like lemons, limes and oranges. It is also readily available in pill or liquid supplements. Although it is a vitamin, Vitamin C is also an antioxidant. This means it can neutralize free radicals which would otherwise damage our skin and other organs. And since it is soluble in water, Vitamin C works both inside and outside of our cells to combat this free radical damage.

Vitamin C And Our Skin

The skin is the largest organ in the human body and collagen is the building blocks. Our skin benefits greatly from Vitamin C because of its unique collagen-forming properties. Scientists have found that collagen protein requires Vitamin C for the molecules to achieve the best configuration possible. Vitamin C prevents collagen from becoming weak and susceptible to damage (a process is called hydroxylation). Vitamin C also increases the level of the procollagen messenger RNA. It is also needed to “export” the procollagen molecules out of our cells and into the extracellular spaces. In other words, Vitamin C is crucial in ensuring the structural integrity of our collagen. Vitamin C also helps to heal any wounds we might have. Studies have shown that when Vitamin C was given to burn victims in high doses, it reduces the transfer of blood and waste products into the tissues (capillary permeability). This could be partly due to Vitamin C’s scavenging effect on free radicals (its antioxidant properties).

In another study, when Vitamin C (2,000 mg) and natural Vitamin E (1,000 IU) were given to 20 men and women, their resistance to sunburn increased by 20% after just 8 days. They had lower levels of inflammation and skin damage compared to the placebo group, which became more sensitive to sunburn.

Vitamin C is one antioxidant that boosts two more – glutathione and Vitamin E
Have you ever heard of that saying, one thing leads to another? This is especially true with Vitamin C. This is because taking Vitamin C doesn’t just increase the Vitamin C levels in our blood, it also increases two more very important antioxidants – glutathione (a major antioxidant) and Vitamin E (a fat-soluble antioxidant).

Higher Vitamin C Levels Boosts Glutathione And Vitamin E
Glutathione Vitamin E
Glutathione is our bodies’ most prevalent antioxidant Vitamin E is probably the most important fat-soluble antioxidant
It plays an important role in detoxing our bodies It protects our cells from oxidation by reacting with fatty radicals
Glutathione is a tripeptide and made up of 3 amino acids:

1.Glycine
2.Glutamic acid
3.Cysteine
Vitamin E is a group of compounds made up of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Tocopherols act as antioxidants in human beings.
Glutathione converts into glutathione peroxidase, an important enzyme which prevents oxidative damage Our liver actually forms the Vitamin E in our blood, but it needs food sources with Vitamin E to do so
Our bodies make its own glutathione supply.
Taking glutathione pills and supplements does not raise the glutathione levels in our blood. Good food sources of Vitamin E include:



1.Wheat germ oil
2.Almonds
3.Sunflower seeds, sunflower oil
4.Hazelnuts
5.Peanut butter

Vitamin C Boosts Glutathione Levels In The Blood

Vitamin C and glutathione have a unique relationship. Vitamin C reduces glutathione back to the active form. In its active form, glutathione will regenerate vitamin C from its oxidized state. Compounds that have Vitamin E activity (tocopherols) also rely on Vitamin C to regenerate back to its active form.

Why is the link between Vitamin C and glutathione levels important in skin lightening?
It’s important because scientists have found out that the way our skin balances between its lighter pigments (pheomelanin) and darker pigments (eumelanin) depends on glutathione, L-cysteine and the TYRP1 enzyme. Since Vitamin C has been scientifically proven to boost gluthathione levels in the blood, we can say that Vitamin C helps to lighten skin color.

1) Glutathione
Glutathione is found in almost all raw fruits and vegetables. Cooking destroys most glutathione, but that doesn’t really matter. Because although glutathione is found in many fruits, vegetables, and meats, our stomachs and intestines ability to absorb glutathione is very poor.

[ Scam Alert! ]
Speaking of which, please do not be fooled by “gluthathione skin whitening pills”. Glutathione pills and supplements cannot, I repeat, cannot raise the glutathione levels in your blood. These are sold by scam artists preying on the desperate. They will only serve to make you poorer.
[ Scam Alert! ]
To raise the glutathione levels in our blood, it is better to eat foods that is high in glutamine instead (Not By Taking Glutathione Pills), such as lean meats, eggs, wheat germ, whey protein and whole grains. These will stimulate the liver so you can produce more glutathione naturally. Glutamine is one of the known precursors of gluthathione production. High doses of Vitamin C will also boost our natural glutathione levels, so supplementation with Vitamin C is important if you want to lighten your skin. Glutathione and Vitamin C show a strong functional interdependence in vivo.
Note:You can be deficient in glutathione if you take Tylenol (acetaminophen) regularly or in large amounts. Doctors treat emergency cases of acetaminophen toxicity with high doses of N-aceytlycysteine (NAC), which raises glutathione levels in the blood.

2) L-Cysteine
L-cysteine is an amino acid found in most high-protein foods including yogurt and whey protein. Good vegetarian sources comes are onions, garlic and broccoli . The L-cysteine derived from N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) helps to boost our liver’s production of glutathione. L-cysteine also helps synthesize proteins, taurine, coenzyme A, and inorganic sulfate.

3) The TYRP1 enzyme (or Tyrosinase-Related Protein 1)
Sounds scary, I know! But all you really need to know is that this is the genetic part of the whole skin lightening discussion. Our TYRP1 gene provides instructions for making the TYRP1 enzyme. The functions of this enzyme are still unclear but it is involved in the production of melanin. It’s likely that this is where our genes come into play in determining the color of our skin. Mutations in the TYRP1 gene has been linked with oculocutaneous albinism. It is very important to note that, individually, none of these factors decides our skin color. All three are needed to play a part.

Enemies of Vitamin C: Pollution, Smoking, Alcohol, Diabetes
If you smoke and drink, chances are your Vitamin C levels are lower than people who don’t. And while we’re at it, do you live in a polluted area? That’ll do it too. Studies have shown that drinking large quantities of alcohol will lower the amount of Vitamin C in your blood plasma and make you excrete vitamin C through urination. Smoking and general pollution will also lower the level of Vitamin C in the blood. Having diabetes will also reduce your body’s Vitamin C levels.

What does all this mean? Should I take Vitamin C to lighten my skin?
Yes, yes, and yes! If want to lighten your skin by internal means using supplements, detoxing or changing your diet, Vitamin C supplements are essential.

Dosage
You should take a high dose of 1,000 – 3,000 mg of Vitamin C daily either through supplements or fruits. A mixture of the two is best. Spread out your intake of Vitamin C throughout the day for maximum effectiveness.


Edited by Benni - Dec 16 2013 at 9:35pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 18 2013 at 4:47pm
Okay, so I watched a few YT videos by KimmayTube today relating to pH of Hair products. She discussed why more alkaline products may leave the hair feeling loose and softer, foaming a lot. came on because I remembered how it felt when I used Dudu Osun on my hair a few days ago . So I foamed it up and pH tested it, now my pH strips measure form 2.0-9.0, well Dudu Osun may have gone over 9.0 if I was able to measure it accurately . That is pretty close to Lye which is 14. No wonder my hair felt so good. I may have given myself a Tex-Lax . Since I know this higher pH raises/opens my hair cuticles NO BUENO !!!!
Now I have to research the effects of this pH on my skin in reference to exfoliating . Off the top, I'm thinking...if this higher pH will lift/open the cuticles of my hair, is it also lifting the outer layer of my skin. Science is NEVER that simple, or is it possible in this case




Edited by Benni - Dec 18 2013 at 4:50pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 18 2013 at 8:51pm
I did something today that I may regret doing. I showered with Dudu Osun using my shower glove. I read later while researching Dudu Osun that most people apply it by lathering their hands, not harsh scrubbing .
Today was also Kojie San soap and LA lotion . Initially I feel nothing unusual. The next day or two will tell. I have made too much progress to now have a negative reaction from scrubbing with this soap.
Still love the soap, but how can you really clean by just applying lather form your hands onto your body.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 18 2013 at 9:15pm
Ouote taken from SKINTRIUM

Wrap Up 2013 with the Best Skin Care Regimen for Your Age


As we grow older, our skin undergoes a variety of changes, ranging from texture shifts to pigmentation issues. To help understand your skin better, take a look at these ideal skin routines to keep you feeling beautiful at every age.

Twenties

Your 20’s are an important time to provide your skin with the necessary care and products to optimize it’s health and to sustain its beauty for years to come.

-   Tip #1:

The most beneficial step you can take in protecting your skin, avoiding unnecessary skin damage, and preventing signs of aging is to wear sunscreen on a daily basis. It may sound a little extreme, but your skin will thank you in the future!



-   Tip #2:

The next step is to look for a gentle cleanser for your face. Avoid using anything harsh as this may leave your skin feeling tight and dry.

It is recommended to wash your face twice a day. However, If you are prone to dry skin, this may not be necessary. Instead, stick to cleansing before bed and after activities that produce grease and/or sweat, such as exercising.

-   Tip #3:

Include a lightweight moisturizer in your skincare routine, even if you have oily skin.

It is best to find an occlusive moisturizer, which blocks water loss from the skin. Since these types of moisturizers prevent evaporation, they are most effective when applied to damp skin.

Humectant moisturizers can also be very beneficial. These types of products pull water into the top layer of the skin from the lower layers.

-   Tip #4:

For those struggling with acne prone skin, using treatments containing salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide are very effective!

The key to using these products is consistency. However, make sure to avoid overusing them, as they can cause irritation.

-   Tip #5:

Lastly, your 20’s can be a time of living carefree and wild. Introducing a 5% concentration Vitamin C serum, can help fight free radical damage that might occur due to drinking or smoking, while helping to even skin tone and texture.

Thirties

The most common skin care challenge to be dealt with in your 30’s is discoloration due to sun damage or melasma. Keeping this in mind, here are the best things you can do for your skin during this time.

-   Tip #1:

Just like in your twenties, reducing exposure to UV rays, especially on your face, neck, and back of hands, is a critical step in taking care of your skin’s health and beauty.



-   Tip #2:

It is time to exfoliate regularly! In your thirties, skin will not naturally exfoliate as frequently as in your twenties. Exfoliating 2-3 times a week should do the job, but any more could end up irritating or damaging your skin.

-   Tip #3:

Ensure you’re using a good moisturizer. When skin becomes dehydrated, fine lines and wrinkles become more apparent and your skin may start overproducing oil.

Emollients are a great type of moisturizer to use in addressing this issue. They fill in the crevices between corneocytes, an essential part of your skin barrier, and improve texture and appearance.

-   Tip #4:

Another important ingredient to include in your nighttime routine are retinoids. They are one of the few ingredients that have been widely researched and effective in terms of reducing photo-aging and wrinkles. While using retinoids it is critical to use sunscreen, as they increase your risk of sun damage by thinning the upper layers of the skin.

Fourties

As your estrogen level begins to taper off in your 40’s, your skin will become dryer and the lines between your eyebrows and around your eyes and mouth will become more prominent. Use these tips to best minimize these unwanted changes.

-   Tip #1:

As always, continue using sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 to prevent any further damage you may already have.

-   Tip #2:

As your estrogen level lowers and skin becomes dryer, continue to use a good moisturizer with high levels of glycerin and hyaluronic acid to maintain moisture. Rejuvenators, which are intended to replenish proteins like collagen, keratin and elastin, can also be very helpful.

-   Tip #3:

If hyperpigmentation has become an issue, linoleic acid is a great aid. The best results are seen when applied at levels of 1%.

There are other ingredients to look for as well, such as vitamin A acids, n-acetyl glucosamine and niacinamide, which can help fight signs of aging. However, stay away from ingredients that are known photosensitizers and irritants, like lavender and citrus oils.

-   Tip #4:

Vitamin C serums and retinoids should also be added into your routine, if they haven’t been already. Vitamin C provides antioxidant protection and fights free radicals while reversing signs of aging. Retinoids help speed up exfoliation and improve collagen production.



Fifties

Loss of tone and sagging may become the biggest struggles in your 50’s and above. So the key is: moisturize, moisturize, moisturize!

-   Tip #1:

Moisturizers will become your best friend, preferably ones with SPF! Pay attention to ingredients and look for humectants, such as glycerin, squalene and hyaluronic acid, which help skin retain water.

-   Tip #2:

Use a cream based face wash that will hydrate as it softens and cleanses. Additionally, if using a toner, try one that is glycerin based, hydrating, non-fragranced and not oil based.

-   Tip #3:

Lastly, apply a retinol under your moisturizer. This is one of the only proven and effective compounds to increase cell turnover and collagen. Use it at night so it doesn’t lose it’s potency when exposed to UV rays, or wear sunscreen over it during the day.

With these guides, you can ensure that you are providing your skin with the best care possible at every age!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 19 2013 at 2:59pm
Thankfully I've not had a negative reaction to scrubbing my skin while using Dudu Osun soap. Maybe it's because I've been using a shower glove for the past 8-10 yrs thinking I was exfoliating, so my skin was used to it. I now know that Dove and a Glove does not equal exfoliation
I washed my face with DSS soap (Dead Sea Salt). Vit-C serum, and C-moisturizer with 30 SPF started my day. This serum and moisturizer has been part of my skin care routine for years, but I did not benefit from them because they were just plastered over dead, perma-tanned skin. Since I started exfoliating, there is no more 'pilling'. They are now being absorbed, and utilized





Edited by Benni - Dec 19 2013 at 3:06pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 19 2013 at 3:23pm
Originally posted by Benni Benni wrote:

Pamper Your Skin

From BULK APOTHECARY
by Danielle Sims

Years ago I found out how incredible easy it is to make lotion. It is so inexpensive and organic that I wondered why anyone would even consider spending a dime on the chemical rich lotions on the market.

Besides I had an added incentive, I have eczema, so I am extremely sensitive to what I put on my skin. Making my own lotion was a great alternative for me.

To begin, for a lotion base all you need is water, oil and an emulsifier. An emulsifier is simply an ingredient that blends the water and oil together.

Here is the base that I begin with to make my lotion:

•½ cup distilled water
•½ cup oil (I usually use olive, almond, macadamia nut, or grape seed) 1 TBS liquid lecithin

You can experiment from here by adding essential oils, combining other oils; you can steep beneficial herbs into your water before you add your oil, etc. . .

Here is a nice winter lotion to get you started:

•½ cup distilled water
•½ cup olive oil
•1 TBS lecithin
•6-8 drops of geranium oil
•2-4 drops Myrrh oil
•400 IU Vitamin E oil (1-2 open capsules)

Geranium oil is good for supporting balance and rejuvenating dry skin conditions and for wrinkled and matured skin. Myrrh is a gentle oil that is effective in replenishing moisture.

Vitamin E oil is an excellent antioxidant and helps to protect the skin as well as a nice preservative.

Blend all ingredients in the blender either on whip or cream. You will have a nice creamy firm lotion. Add more water to make a lighter lotion. Store in the refrigerator in hot climates or store in a cool place. Shake well before use.

Enjoy your lotion. Hopefully this little recipe will inspire you to become creative!


Zinc Oxide can be added to this lotion recipe to create a lotion with Sunscreen. Maybe a preservative also
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