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MY JOURNEY TO BETTER SKIN CARE

 
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Benni View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 06 2013 at 2:19pm
My plan to officially start week-2 tomorrow. I will like to shower with the Kojie soap twice daily, maybe 2-3x/week. This is so 'iffy' about this since I don't just wake up, and get going . It takes a couple cups of Coffee, and putzing around before I can get going. Then my showers will only be about 4 hrs apart . I am not big on changes to my normal routine, I am a creature of habit !!

I am hoping not to have to do a L A peel on my face. I had a series of them done in '97 by a Beverly Hill Dermatologist, and it burned like heck. He also did not advise sun protection/limitation, or proper skin care as a whole !!   Right now it is really hard for me to imagine applying Lactic Acid to my face. It is okay in my Lotion, but just plain old L A . I may consider 'peeling' my elbows, knees, and maybe some stubborn scars on my lower legs. We shall see . In the meantime, I will continue to treat these stubborn areas with Nadinola twice daily and hope for the best

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 06 2013 at 8:28pm
Since I will attempt doing 2 Kojic Soap showers tomorrow, I skipped it tonight, and shaved my legs instead. Hopefully any nicks I may have gotten will have a chance to heal. I am pretty certain I will not have a problem with that since I used Amlactin lotion without unusual sensation on my legs.

I am going to have to make more of my Oil blend, it was fashioned after one made by Naptural85 (YouTube). It's good for my hair and skin. . I will be using this after my morning shower, and Amlactin in the evening.

Having this night off from 'Kojie' is liberating

Hope I can really follow through in the a.m.



Edited by Benni - Nov 06 2013 at 8:39pm
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I will just like to add (sorry I did not do this earlier ), that this thread is NOT PROPRIETARY. It is named My Journey to Better Skin Care, but it can be anyone's 'My Journey To Better Skin Care'. So if you are also on a 'Journey', feel free to join in.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 07 2013 at 10:01pm
Oh WOW!!!

Going outdoors today was an eye opener . Ture lighting is so obvious. My facial skin is coming back to natural it's unbelievable, especially in just 1-week. I have been looking at this face for so many years(5), normal just seemed NORMAL, until you can see something different . I really missed what I used to be. It was right there at my fingertips.   I just need to keep doing what I've been doing over the past few days. Easy, peasy WOW !!!!
Nothing I've been doing has caused hardship or difficulty.
No matter what you've read, try it as written, then if you're comfortable with it, then you can tinker. My mind is now so full of ideas, the sky's the limit.... The Butterfly is coming out of the cocoon!!!
So far I've only invested $30, and I've not used it up all up. Slow and steady .
I did return the Sunblock I purchased earlier and got one with Zinc, but it was SPF 30. To me, having the Zinc at a lower SPF was better. We shall see
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 07 2013 at 11:14pm
Plan for tomorrow...

Shower in the morning with Kojic Soap. allow it to dry, then dress for the day. Shower in the evening, apply my skin Oils for sleep.


My results so far has been leaps and bounds from what i've expected in such a short time. Trying different combinations have had no negative results. So I am ready to tinker with it, if not I can always go back to what worked.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 08 2013 at 3:34pm
So I am having anxiety because I am seeing such improvement in my skin that I want to go full steam ahead. However, I must rein it in because exfoliating is a process. Can't help it though, because I don't have any negative reaction to what I've been doing, it makes me feel that I can handle more.

Patience..patience

My hands and feet are also doing very well . That was a concern for me since my hands are being washed frequently(I'm a bit of a germaphobe), but treating it with the soap and Amlactin, and wearing gloves at night has worked. My Ears are also exfoliating. That was tricky because I was concerned for my hair, but it is working out well

It is much easier exfoliating during the day, and applying the oil at night. This may have been more difficult if I had to go out to work, but still do-able.

Can't wait for the first month to go by, so I can be a tad more aggressive with the process.

Must keep reminding myself.....S l o w and s t e a d y
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Understanding the Ingredients in Skin Care Products(Also Called 'Facial Cosmetics')

Skin Care and Cosmetics
Know Your Own Skin Type Before Choosing Skin Care Products

The information in this document will help you understand the latest ingredients in skin care products that may benefit your skin.

Use this information to sort through various skin care products on the market. If you’re still unsure which skin care products are right for you, ask your dermatologist or consult with a skin esthetician at your local salon or beauty counter.

Alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs)
Over-the-counter skin care products containing alpha-hydroxy acids (glycolic, lactic, tartaric and citric acids) have become increasingly popular over the last five years. In the U.S. alone, there are over 200 manufacturers of skin care products that contain alpha-hydroxy acids. Creams and lotions with alpha-hydroxy acids may help with fine lines, irregular pigmentation and age spots, and may help decrease enlarged pores. Side effects of alpha-hydroxy acids include mild irritation and sun sensitivity. For that reason, sunscreen also should be used every morning. To help avoid skin irritation with alpha-hydroxy acids, it is advisable to start with a product with concentrations of AHA of 10 to 15 percent. Also, make sure you ease into it. You want to get your skin used to alpha-hydroxy acids, so you should only initially apply the skin care product every other day, gradually working up to daily application.

Beta-hydroxy acid (salicylic acid)
Salicylic acid also has been studied for its effect on skin that has aged prematurely due to exposure to ultraviolet rays from the sun. It exfoliates skin and can improve the texture and color of the skin. It penetrates oil-laden hair follicle openings and, as a result, also helps with acne. There are many skin care products available that contain salicylic acid. Some are available over-the-counter and others require a doctor's prescription. Studies have shown that salicylic acid is less irritating than skin care products containing alpha-hydroxy acids, while providing similar improvement in skin texture and color.

Hydroquinone
Skin care products containing hydroquinone are popularly referred to as bleaching creams or lightening agents. These skin care products are used to lighten hyperpigmentation, such as age spots and dark spots related to pregnancy or hormone therapy (melasma or chloasma). Some over-the-counter skin care products contain hydroquinone, but your doctor can also prescribe a cream with a higher concentration of hydroquinone if your skin doesn’t respond to over-the-counter treatments. If you are allergic to hydroquinones, you may benefit from use of products containing kojic acid instead.

Kojic Acid
Kojic acid is a more recent remedy for the treatment of pigment problems and age spots. Discovered in 1989, kojic acid has a similar effect as hydroquinone. Kojic acid is derived from a fungus, and studies have shown that it is effective as a lightening agent, inhibiting production of melanin (brown pigment).

Retinol
This is a derivative of vitamin A, and you will see that a lot of skin care products contain retinol. Retinol’s stronger counterpart is tretinoin, which is the active ingredient in Retin-A and Renova. If your skin is too sensitive to use Retin-A, retinol is an excellent alternative. Here’s why skin responds to skin care products with retinol: vitamin A has a molecular structure that’s tiny enough to get into the lower layers of skin, where it finds collagen and elastin. Retinol is proven to improve mottled pigmentation, fine lines and wrinkles, skin texture, skin tone and color, and your skin’s hydration levels. You may also hear about retinyl palmitate. This falls into the same family as retinol, but if the skin care product you choose contains retinyl palmitate, you will need to use more of this product than one that contains retinol to get the same effect.

L-Ascorbic Acid
This is the only form of vitamin C that you should look for in your skin care products. There are many skin care products on the market today that boast vitamin C derivatives as an ingredient (magnesium ascorbyl phosphate or ascorbyl palmitate, for example), but L-ascorbic acid is the only useful form of vitamin C in skin care products. Vitamin C is the only antioxidant that is proven to stimulate the synthesis of collagen as well, which is essential since your body’s natural collagen production decreases as you age. Sun exposure will also accelerate the decrease in collagen. Studies have shown that vitamin C helps to minimize fine lines, scars, and wrinkles.

Hyaluronic Acid
Skin care products containing this substance are often used in conjunction with vitamin C products to assist in effective penetration. Hyaluronic acid (also known as a glycosaminoglycan) is often touted for its ability to "reverse" or stop aging. In news reports, you might have heard of hyaluronic acid as the "key to the fountain of youth." This is because the substance occurs naturally (and quite abundantly) in humans and animals, and is found in young skin, other tissues, and joint fluid. Hyaluronic acid is a component of the body’s connective tissues, and is known to cushion and lubricate. As you age, however, the forces of nature destroy hyaluronic acid. Diet and smoking can also affect your body’s level of hyaluronic acid over time. Skin care products with hyaluronic acid are most frequently used to treat wrinkled skin.

Copper Peptide
Copper peptide is often referred to as the most effective skin regeneration product, even though it’s only been on the market since 1997. Here’s why: Studies have shown that copper peptide promotes collagen and elastin production, and also acts as an antioxidant. It also promotes production of glycosaminoglycans (think hyaluronic acid, as an example). Studies have also shown that copper-dependent enzymes increase the benefits of the body’s natural tissue building processes.The substance helps to firm, smooth, and soften skin, doing it in less time than most other anti-aging skin care products. Clinical studies have found that copper peptides also remove damaged collagen and elastin from the skin and scar tissue because they activate the skin’s system responsible for those functions.

Alpha-Lipoic Acid
You may have heard of alpha-lipoic acid as "the miracle in a jar" for its anti-aging effects. It’s a newer, ultra-potent antioxidant that helps fight future skin damage and helps repair past damage. Alpha-lipoic acid has been referred to as a "universal antioxidant" because it’s soluble in both water and oil, which permits its entrance to all parts of the cell. Due to this quality, it is believed that alpha-lipoic acid can provide the greatest protection against damaging free radicals when compared with other antioxidants. Alpha-lipoic acid diminishes fine lines, gives skin a healthy glow, and boosts levels of other antioxidants, such as vitamin C.

DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol)
If you’ve heard of fish referred to as brain food, you can thank DMAE. This substance is naturally produced in the brain, but DMAE is also present in anchovies, salmon and sardines, boosting the production of acetylcholine, which is important for proper mental functions. DMAE in skin care products shows remarkable effects when applied topically to skin, resulting in the reduction of fine lines and wrinkles.

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Skin Care and Aging

Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, loses fat, and no longer looks as plump and smooth as it once did. Your veins and bones can be seen more easily. Scratches, cuts, or bumps can take longer to heal. Years of sun tanning or being out in the sunlight for a long time can lead to wrinkles, dryness, age spots, and even cancer. But there are things you can do to help your skin.

Dry skin and itching
Many older people suffer from dry skin, often on their lower legs, elbows, and lower arms. Dry skin feels rough and scaly. There are many possible reasons for dry skin, such as:

Not drinking enough liquids
Staying out in the sun
Being in very dry air
Smoking
Having stress
Losing sweat and oil glands (common with age)
Dry skin also can be caused by health problems, such as diabetes or kidney disease. Using too much soap, antiperspirant, or perfume and taking hot baths will make dry skin worse.

Because older people have thinner skin, scratching itches can cause bleeding that can lead to infection. Some medicines make the skin itchier. Itching can cause sleep problems. If your skin is very dry and itchy, see your doctor.

Moisturizers like lotions, creams, or ointments can soothe dry, itchy skin. They should be used everyday. Try taking fewer baths and using milder soap to help your dry skin. Warm water is better than hot water for your skin. Some people find that a humidifier (an appliance that adds moisture to a room) helps.

Bruises
Older people may bruise more easily than younger people. And, it can take longer for the bruises to heal. Some medicines or illnesses cause easier bruising. If you see bruises and you don’t know how you got them, especially on parts of your body usually covered by clothing, see your doctor.

Wrinkles
Over time, skin begins to wrinkle. Things in the environment, like ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun, make the skin less elastic. Gravity can cause skin to sag and wrinkle.

Certain habits like frowning also wrinkle the skin. Some of these habits are easier to change than others. You may not be able to change how you lie when you sleep, but you can quit smoking. Not smoking is a great way to prevent wrinkles.

A lot of claims are made about how to make wrinkles go away. Not all of them work. Some can be painful or even dangerous and many must be done by the doctor. Talk with a doctor specially trained in skin problems (a dermatologist) or your regular doctor if you are worried about wrinkles.

Age spots and skin tags
Age spots are sometimes called “liver spots,” but they have nothing to do with the liver. These flat, brown spots are often caused by years in the sun. They are bigger than freckles, flat, and many times show up on areas like the face, hands, arms, back, and feet. Age spots are harmless, but if they bother you, talk to a dermatologist about removing them. Also, a sunscreen or sunblock may prevent more sun damage.

Skin tags are small, usually flesh-colored growths of skin that have a raised surface. They are a common problem as people age, especially for women. They are most often found on the eyelids, neck, and body folds such as the arm pit, chest, and groin. Skin tags are harmless, but they can become irritated. A doctor can remove them if they bother you.

Skin cancer
Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. The main cause of skin cancer is the sun. Sunlamps and tanning booths can also cause skin cancer. Anyone can get cancer, but people with fair skin that freckles easily are at greatest risk. Skin cancer may be cured if it is found before it spreads to other parts of the body.

There are three types of skin cancers. Two types, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, grow slowly and rarely spread to other parts of the body. These types of cancer are found mostly on parts of the skin exposed to the sun, like the head, face, neck, hands, and arms, but can happen anywhere on your body. The third and most dangerous type of skin cancer is melanoma. It is rarer than the other types, but can spread to other organs and be deadly.

Check your skin regularly, like once a month, for things that may be cancer. Look for changes such as a new growth, a sore that doesn’t heal, or a bleeding mole. Also, check moles, birthmarks, or other parts of the skin for the “ABCDE’s.” ABCDE stands for:

A = asymmetry (one half of the growth looks different from the other half)
B = borders that are irregular
C = color changes or more than one color
D = diameter greater than the size of a pencil eraser
E = evolving, meaning changes in size, shape, symptoms (itching, tenderness), surface (especially bleeding), or shades of color

Don’t wait for the area to hurt—skin cancer isn’t usually painful. See your doctor right away if you have any of these signs.

Keep your skin healthy
The best way to keep your skin healthy is to be careful in the sun.

Limit time in the sun. Try to stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. This is when the sun’s rays are strongest. Don’t be fooled by cloudy skies. The sun’s rays can pass through clouds. You can also get sunburned if you are in water, so be careful when you are in a pool, lake, or the ocean.

Use sunscreen. Look for a sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) number of 15 or higher. It’s best to choose sunscreens with “broad spectrum” on the label. “Water resistant” sunscreen stays on your skin even if you get wet or sweat a lot, but it isn’t waterproof and needs to be put on about every 2 hours.

Wear protective clothing. A hat with a wide brim can shade your neck, ears, eyes, and head. Look for sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of the sun’s rays. If you have to be in the sun, wear loose, lightweight, long-sleeved shirts and long pants or long skirts.

Avoid tanning. Don’t use sunlamps or tanning beds. Tanning pills are not approved by the FDA and might not be safe.

Your skin may change with age. But remember, there are things you can do to help. Check your skin often. If you find any changes that worry you, see your doctor.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 08 2013 at 8:07pm
Dry skin care

Dry skin is defined as flaking or scaling when there is no evidence of dermatitis, or inflammation, of the skin. It is most prominent on the shins, hands, and sides of the abdomen , and can be associated with itching. It is more common during the winter months, when humidity is low, and improves in the summer time. Some people also have a genetic, or hereditary, tendency to develop dry skin. In addition, elderly people tend to have more trouble with dry skin due to the natural changes in skin that occur with age.

Treatment is important because extensively dry skin can lead to dermatitis, or eczema. Dry skin may be prevented or treated by:

Taking lukewarm baths or showers
Limiting baths/showers to 5 to 10 minutes
Applying a moisturizer right after drying off from a shower or washing your hands
Using a moisturizing body soap and hand soap
Using heavier creams or ointments during the winter months and lighter lotions in the summer
If the above regimen does not improve the condition of the dry skin, it is possible that the flaking is a sign of underlying dermatitis (which is also called eczema). There are different types of dermatitis that may cause dry, itchy, flaking skin. They include:

Seborrheic dermatitis -- a red, dermatitis — a red, scaly, mildly itchy rash on the scalp, eyebrows, and sides of the nose in areas that contain many oil glands.
Allergic contact dermatitis— a rash that results when the skin comes in contact with a substance that causes an immune reaction, such as poison ivy. Allergic contact dermatitis of the hands often causes scaling on the fingers.
Atopic dermatitis — long-lasting type of dermatitis usually starting in childhood, and tends to run in families. It also may cause excessively dry, itchy skin on the face and body.
Athlete's foot — dry flaking on the soles of the feet caused by a fungus.
Sun protection
Protecting your skin from the sun is important because the sun emits ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Over time, UVR exposure causes many changes in the skin, including wrinkles, discoloration, freckles or age spots, benign (non-cancerous) growths, and pre-cancerous, or cancerous areas. In fact, most skin cancers are related to sun exposure.

UVR consists of two main subtypes: UVB and UVA. UVB rays are responsible for sunburns and tanning. UVA rays are believed to be responsible for photoaging--the damage that occurs to the skin from many years of exposure to the sun. Both types have been implicated in promoting cancer. Most sunscreen products available prevent sunburns by blocking UVB rays. Newer sunscreen products are also successful in blocking UVA rays. For that reason, sun protection recommendations emphasize certain behaviors, as well as the use of sunscreens. The recommendations include:

Avoiding midday sun between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Wearing wide-brimmed hats, long long-sleeved shirts, and pants
Using a generous amount of sunscreen and reapplying it frequently (every 2- to 3 hours)
Using sunscreens that have a sun protection factor (SPF) greater than 15, and that have UVA and UVB coverage
Avoiding tanning beds
Protecting the skin from excessive sun exposure may decrease vitamin D levels, and a higher dose of vitamin D intake may be necessary for individuals with known risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency, such as dark skin, the elderly, photosensitive individuals, obese individuals, or those with fat malabsorption.

Facial skin care for acne-prone skin
If you are prone to acne, choose a cleanser specially formulated for acne. These products often contain salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide, which help to clear acne sores. Clean your face gently, as trauma to the acne breakouts may worsen the acne or cause scarring. Avoid harsh mechanical scrubbing of skin and picking lesions. Try to minimize your use of facial moisturizers. If you need to use a moisturizer, use only light, non-comedogenic moisturizers, which do not aggravate acne. Also, women should use an oil-free foundation, as heavy makeup or other cosmetic products that block pores may cause a flare-up of acne.

Facial skin care for mature skin
Roughness, wrinkling, irregular pigmentation (coloration), inelasticity, enlarged sebaceous (oil) glands, precancerous and cancerous lesions sometimes occur with aged and photoaged skin. Sunscreens and sun protection are important to prevent further progression of photoaging. Furthermore, smoking has been shown to accelerate aging of skin, so stopping smoking is important for good skin health. In addition, a well-balanced diet--with or without a multivitamin--helps the skin get the nutrition it needs to help repair ongoing damage from the sun and other environmental elements. Many topical non-prescription and prescription products are currently available for anti-aging purposes, including:

Tretinoin (Retin-A® and Renova®) — Retin-A is a prescription medication initially developed to treat acne. In addition, it was discovered that it also improved skin texture and color when used over an extended period of time. Tretinoin exfoliates the skin (removes a dead layer of skin cells), helps even out pigmentation and minimizes fine lines. Many people can benefit from using tretinoin or related products at bedtime followed by a cream or lotion containing glycolic acid. Side effects of tretinoin include redness, peeling, tightness, and swelling. You may be able to minimize these side effects by initially using tretinoin every other night and then — over the first month — gradually increasing the frequency to nightly. Tretinoin also makes the skin more sensitive to ultraviolet rays from the sun, and we recommend use of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in the morning.

Alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) — Alpha hydroxy acids (glycolic, lactic, tartaric, and citric acids) are found as ingredients of numerous skin products. In the United States alone, there are approximately 185 manufacturers of products containing AHAs. Creams and lotions with AHA may help with fine lines, irregular pigmentation, age spots, and may help decrease enlarged pores. Side effects of AHAs include mild irritation and sun sensitivity. For that reason, sunscreen also should be used every morning.

Beta hydroxy acid (salicylic acid) — Salicylic acid also has been studied for its effect on photoaged skin. It exfoliates skin, and can improve the texture and color of the skin. It penetrates oil-laden hair follicle openings and, as a result, also helps with acne. There are many products available that contain salicylic acid. Some are available over-the-counter, and others require a doctor's prescription.

Hydroquinone — Hydroquinone is a bleaching agent that is used to remove hyperpigmentation, such as age spots and dark spots related to pregnancy, hormone therapy, or excessive sun exposure.

© Copyright 1995-2009 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 09 2013 at 3:15pm
So I am sticking with the programme, except last night I slept with the kojie soap on, dry brushed this morning before showering, and applying a Vit-C Lotion and my Oil mix. I think I will repeat this tonight except, after the soap has absorbed, I will apply Amlactin. My skin seem to tolerate each of these well, maybe a combination will be better, I don't know, but will try it .

Since starting this I noticed a few 'bumps' on my face. I have never had an acne problem, but considered this may be a part of the process. Those 'bumps' never surfaced or erupted, instead they have decreased in size, so I will tolerate them and see what happens in the future.

All in all, I am sticking with the programme, not adding anything new, or changing too much although I am tempted to .

I am noticing a few lighter splotches on my face, hopefull this will all come together since I am not expecting everything to even out all at once.
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