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Ketogenic Diet for Vegetarians

Is a ketogenic diet for vegetarians reasonably possible? Regardless of your motives for cutting out the animal meat, you are probably equally aware of all the buzz about the ketogenic diet and wondering if you can go keto for all the performance while staying away from all the meats.

The answer is yes, but it takes a little extra thought. While the traditional keto diet typically involves a lot of meat for protein, it’s also not necessary to eat meat while following the plan. In fact, the biggest component of the ketogenic diet is fat, which you can easily get from vegetarian foods.

For omnivores going keto, the most common mistake is eating too much protein. 

However, the biggest mistake vegetarians make is eating too many carbohydrates from vegetables. You do have to be a little more careful with your carb and protein choices since traditional vegetarian forms of protein include things like beans and grains, which aren’t a part of a keto diet. 

Let’s tackle this by discussing the three macronutrients one at a time.

CARBOHYDRATES FOR A VEGETARIAN KETOGENIC DIET

Since vegetarian diets are typically higher in carbs than meat-eating diets, it’s especially important to understand the right types of carbs when following a meat-free ketogenic diet.

GOOD CARBS VS BAD CARBS

Besides getting plenty of healthy fats, watching your carbs is one of the most important factors here—and a lot of the go-to meals and especially snacks common for vegetarians and vegans are pretty carb-heavy. But excessive carbohydrates (even from veggies) aren’t part of a keto diet. Of course, refined carbs like sugar, flour, bread, cereal, chips, etc. are immediately off the table.

BAD CARBS (HIGH GLYCEMIC, HIGHLY PROCESSED)

Here are some carb sources to remove from your home and kitchen:

  • Pastas
  • Breads
  • Chips, crackers, and pretzels
  • Tortillas
  • Rice
  • Sodas
  • Cereals
  • Any other packaged foods with refined sugars or flours
  • Fruit juices and most fruits
  • White potatoes, sweet potatoes
  • Starchy vegetables

Good carbs on a vegetarian keto diet are basically the same as those on a normal keto diet, such as low-carb fruits, full-fat yogurts, and low-carb veggies (more on this below).

GOOD CARBS (LIMITED) FOR A VEGETARIAN ON KETO

Low-carb Vegetables

If you’re one of those vegetarians who hates vegetables, this diet is going to be harder for you. While the most important aspect of keto is keeping your fat content high, you’ll need healthy low-carb veggies to provide enough bulk and fiber to fill in your meals and get enough to eat.

Don’t be afraid to explore and open yourself up to trying new vegetables in different ways. If raw turns you off, try cooking some in coconut oil or butter with lots of seasonings. Give yourself time to get used to the changes. Here are some low-carb vegetables to rely on:

  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Collard greens
  • Swiss chard
  • Lettuce
  • Asparagus
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Cucumber
  • Summer and winter squash
  • Red and white cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Bell peppers
  • Onions
  • Mushrooms
  • Tomatoes
  • Eggplants
  • Garlic

 Fruits

All types of fruits should be limited, but berries are lower in sugars and carbs, so they’re typically okay in small amounts and at the end of the day before you fast while sleeping:

  • Blackberries
  • Strawberries
  • Raspberries
  • Blueberries

NON-CARBS TO MENTION (CONDIMENTS AND SPICES)

Condiments

If you can make all your condiments at home, that’s the best choice, but these are okay to buy too. They are generally non-carbohydrate containing, or their carb count is microscopic.

  • Soy sauce or coconut aminos
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • Hot sauces
  • Yellow mustard
  • Mayonnaise (look for brands made with cage-free eggs)
  • Sugar-free ketchup
  • Sauerkraut (free of sugars)
  • Sugar-free or low-sugar high-fat salad dressings

Spices

  • Basil
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Rosemary
  • Thyme
  • Cilantro
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Chili powder
  • Cumin
  • Cinnamon
  • Nutmeg
  • Lemon or lime juices
  • Pepper and salt

PROTEIN ON A VEGETARIAN KETOGENIC DIET

Here’s a comprehensive list of protein-containing foods that have the green light on a keto vegetarian diet:

VEGETARIAN KETOGENIC PROTEINS

  • Eggs
  • Dairy
  • Tempeh
  • Natto
  • Miso
  • Nuts and seeds (see below)

If eating any soy products at all, try to stick to only those that are non-GMO and fermented (like organic tempeh).

If you find your protein needs still aren’t being met, you could consider using an organic rice or hemp protein powder, but only use it as a supplement—not a regular meal replacement. Also, just remember that getting too much protein is a common ketogenic diet mistake that prevents you from entering ketosis.

Be wary of packaged vegan and vegetarian meat substitutes: While these might be good substitutes for meat in terms of fat and protein, they might also contain a high amount of carbs. Be sure to check the carb content per serving, and consider the ingredients. Is it full or preservatives and fillers? Better meat substitutes would be any of the proteins mentioned above as well as portobello mushrooms or eggplant.

FATS FOR VEGETARIANS IN KETOSIS

NUTS AND SEEDS

Nuts and seeds are sources of both protein and fat. Just be sure to choose mostly low-carb and high-fat choices, as some nuts and seeds are higher in carbs than others and can add up quickly. Check out our full guide to nuts on the ketogenic diet and recipes like our insanely easy Macadamia Nut Fat Bomb.

Best nut options (lower carb):

  • Pecans
  • Brazil nuts
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Walnuts
  • Coconut (unsweetened)
  • Hazelnuts
  • Pine nuts
  • Almonds
  • Nut butters made from any of the above

Ketogenic Diet for Vegetarians

Nut options to eat sparingly or not at all(higher carb):

  • Peanuts
  • Pistachios
  • Cashews
  • Chestnuts

Best seed options:

  • Chia seeds
  • Flaxseeds

HEALTHY OILS

The right types of oils are great for a ketogenic diet because they’re entirely made of fat. MCT’s in particular are a type of fat that is metabolized quicker than most and broken down into useable energy. It also can easily cross the blood-brain barrier, which is why they are so beneficial to our mental clarityand performance. Perfect Keto made a convenient MCT Oil Powder just for this reason, and more can be found in our article Are MCT Supplements Worth Taking? Here are some more great options:

  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Avocado oil
  • MCT oil
  • Macadamia oil
  • Flaxseed oil

Other Non-Dair Fat Sources

  • Olives
  • Avocados
  • Cocoa butter
  • Coconut cream

Dairy and Eggs

  • Heavy whipping cream
  • Cream cheese
  • Cottage cheese
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hard cheeses like parmesan, swiss, feta, and cheddar (full-fat)
  • Soft cheese like brie, Monterrey jack, mozzarella, and bleu cheese (full-fat)
  • Butter (grass-fed)
  • Eggs (make sure they’re pastured or free-range and preferably omega-3-enriched)
  • Full-fat unsweetened Greek yogurt or coconut yogurt

Okay, that’s about everything for the foods you’ll need for a high-quality vegetarian keto diet, but what’s the best way to put it into action? Perfect Keto has you covered, and navigate over to our recipe page as well. 🙂

VEGETARIAN KETO MEAL IDEAS

Breakfasts Ideas

  • Vegetables and eggs with avocado fried in coconut or olive oil
  • Eggs frittata with asparagus and avocado
  • Vegetable and feta omelet fried in coconut or olive oil
  • Smoothie made from coconut cream, some berries, ice, full-fat yogurt, almond butter, and stevia extract

Lunch Ideas

  • Egg and avocado salad
  • Mixed greens salad with avocado, mozzarella, pesto, olives, bell pepper, onions, a few nuts, lemon juice, and extra virgin olive oil dressing
  • Vegetarian low-carb Greek salad with feta, tomatoes, onions, olives, fresh Greek spices, and extra virgin olive oil
  • Stir-fried cauliflower “rice” with veggies and eggs

Dinner Ideas

  • Cheese pizza with cauliflower crust and broccoli
  • Pasta made with zucchini noodles and keto alfredo sauce
  • Portobello “steak” with kale salad and cauliflower mashed potatoes
  • Eggplant parmesan fried in coconut oil

Okay, we are almost to the end of the post and I can hear you thinking…

What About Keto as a Vegan?

Great question. Since a vegan diet is even more restricted in terms of low-carb foods, keto as a vegan is highly impractical and takes a lot more thought. However, you can still consume plenty of fats if you stick to healthy oils, nuts/nut butters, avocados, seeds/seed butters, and coconut as your sources while making sure you get enough protein too.

Overall, a ketogenic diet for vegetarians can take a little more thought if you’re new to it, but it’s definitely possible for those wanting to avoid animal by-products entirely.

Best advice is to go for it and test your ketone levels and adjust from there.



Edited by Benni - Aug 18 2017 at 3:23pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 18 2017 at 7:54pm
Today's feeding time started at 4:40p.  Kitchen closes at 8p daily.Big smile

Marcos...
Cals...982
Prot...53.5g
Fats...77.8g
Carb..16g
NC....10g

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On Saturday 8/19 got an S.O.S call to go to work.  I weighted the same as the previous day... 0 lbs lost.  However, that dreaded contraption we call a "Bra" was very telling.  It hooked in  the the last row of hooks very comfortably Shocked Shocked...Clap  If that keeps up I will be shopping for a new size Bra soon.  
Feeling enlightened, I packed a Thigh, 3 ozs Breast, Asparagus, Celery, 3 hard boiled Eggs, Avocado, Mayo and C-nut oil.  Strangely, I  felt 'hunger' at 11a,  I believe that was more 'cravings' than hunger because of all the candy, chocolates, pizza, doughnuts, sandwiches, Chinese and Mexican foods laying about. My co-workers believe in feeding the world LOL.   I was not even tempted to partake.  Instead I headed for the jars of Peanut Butter in know was in a cabinet,  neglecting my 'packed' foodEmbarrassed  That P-nut butter had a skull and cross bones on the list of ingredients called DEXTROSE!!!! I went in with a spoon anyway LOL   I later had the breast, asparagus, avocado and a little Mayo.  Added C-nut oil to every cup of coffee.  'Work' coffee is not like 'home' coffee.
The guilt lasted until I fell asleep after midnight,  along with knowing the remainder of that jar of P-nut butter was now in my refrigerator.

Estimated Macros
Cals....1700
Fats....140g
Carbs..40g
Protein..67g
--------------------------------------------------------------------


Sunday 8/20.... 
I had to face the music and get on the scale... 
11 ounces lost Shocked Shocked Shocked Clap.  
I will enjoy this bit of victory today, because tomorrow the scale could show 1 or 2 lbs gain.


Edited by Benni - Aug 20 2017 at 12:55pm
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Today's Macros....
Cals.... 991
Fats.....75.8g
Carbs...17.7g
Net Carbs 10g
Protein..61.5g
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Surprise..surprise.  Down another 11 ounces !!! 
That is almost 1 1/2 lbs in the past 2 days. Shocked
During the  first 2 months of this WOE I had 'mishaps' with wine.   The whole box of Franzia Chillable Red each time, and each time it took about 2 weeks for my body to recover.  The lbs went up, fluctuated and froze.   I expected to have  a response after having 1/4 jar of P-nut butter.  So thankful that did not happen, but I will still stay away from the P-nut butter for a while, and not tempt faith.

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Autophagy: The Real Way to Cleanse Your Body

For the last time, forget juice cleanses and detox diets. They’re fluffy nonsense words. While there’s probably nothing wrong with drinking your weight in liquid kale, it won’t flush out toxins any faster than if you were eating, you know, actual food.

The good news: There's a little-known way your body does cleanse itself, and it’s a process that you can control.

All you need to do is practice a little self-cannibalism.

What?

Yes, you can actually train your body to eat itself—and believe it or not, you want it to.

It's a natural process called autophagy (literally “self-eating”), and it’s the body’s system of cleaning house: Your cells create membranes that hunt out scraps of dead, diseased, or worn-out cells; gobble them up; strip ’em for parts; and use the resulting molecules for energy or to make new cell parts.

“Think of it as our body’s innate recycling program,” says Colin Champ, M.D., a board-certified radiation oncologist, assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and author of Misguided Medicine. “Autophagy makes us more efficient machines to get rid of faulty parts, stop cancerous growths, and stop metabolic dysfunction like obesity and diabetes.”

There’s also evidence that the process plays a hand in controlling inflammation and immunity. When scientists engineer rats that are incapable of autophagy, they’re fatter, sleepier, and have higher cholesterol and impaired brains.

To sum it up, autophagy is key to slowing the aging process. And you can learn how to do it better.

3 Ways to Self-Destruct

The only &amp;quot;cleanse&amp;quot; you need to know about.

"So how do I eat myself?” is a question you probably haven’t asked before, but we’re about to tell you. First of all, autophagy is a response to stress, so you’re actually going to want to put your body through stress in order to drum up a little extra auto-cannibalism. (We know this article keeps getting weirder, but trust us.)

As is often the case, short-term discomfort can bring long-term benefits. Here are three main ways to boost your autophagy.

1. Exercise

In case the sweating, grunting, and post-workout paindidn’t tip you off, here’s a reminder: Exercise puts stress on the body. Working out actually damages your muscles, causing tiny microscopic tears that the body then rushes to heal, making the muscles stronger and more resistant to any further “damage” you might put it through.

Regular exercise is the most popular way that people unintentionally help their body to cleanse. (So there’s actually something to that fresh, renewed feeling you get after working out.)

Regular exercise is the most popular way that people unintentionally help their body to cleanse.

One study looked at autophagosomes, structures that form around the pieces of cells that the body has decided to recycle. After engineering mice to have glowing green autophagosomes (as one does), scientists found that the rate at which the mice were healthily demolishing their own cells drastically increased after they ran for 30 minutes on a treadmill. The rate continued increasing until they’d been running for 80 minutes. (This actually inspired the study’s lead scientist to buy a treadmill.)

What about humans? “Determining the level of exercise needed to stimulate autophagy, and the extent to which the process is upregulated, are hard questions to answer at the moment,” says Daniel Klionsky, Ph.D., a cellular biologist at the University of Michigan who specializes in autophagy. “(But) clearly exercise has many benefits, aside from the possible role of autophagy, so that is probably a good bet in general.” And if you like tough workouts, all the better: Champ recommends relatively intense exercise for maximum benefits.

2. Fast

Ironically for folks who "cleanse" by drinking juice, the act of eating actually works against autophagy. Skipping meals, it turns out, is another stressful act that the body may not immediately love but ultimately benefits from.

In fact, research has shown there are loads of benefitsto an occasional fast, and some of them—like lower risks of diabetes and heart disease—might be attributed to autophagy.

It’s also pretty remarkable how much research has focused specifically on the way fasting promotes autophagy in the brain, suggesting that it could be an effective way to lower the risk of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

In some studies, intermittent fasting was shown to improve cognitive function, brain structure, and neuroplasticity, which may help the brain to learn more easily. That said, it wasn’t totally clear if autophagy was the cause; plus, those studies were done on rodents. People aren’t rodents, and we can’t always assume the benefits will be the same for us humans.

In any case, here's our quick guide to intermittent fasting. Practitioners usually forego food for anywhere from 12 to 36 hours at a time, making sure to drink plenty of water. (You might also want to limit activity to gentle yoga or stretching.)

3. Lower Your Carb Intake

While Champ fasts for 18 hours per day a couple times per week, he recognizes that for the average Joe, that can be a tough routine to follow. Simply forgoing food on the odd occasion seems to work (one study showed a lower risk of heart disease from just one fast day per month), but there’s another way to get similar benefits without giving up your favorite rib eye (though you’ll probably need to quit candy).

It’s called ketosis, and it’s an increasingly popular diet among bodybuilders and anyone seeking a longer lifespan. The idea is to reduce carbohydrates to such low levels that the body has no choice but to use fat as a fuel source instead.

Ketosis is like an autophagy hack. You get a lot of the same metabolic changes and benefits of fasting without actually fasting.

Ketosis can help people lose body fat while retaining muscle, and there’s some evidence that it helps the body fight cancerous tumors, lowers the risk of diabetes, and protects against some brain disorders, particularly epilepsy. (Researchshowed that more than half of children with epilepsy who go on the diet have at least a 50 percent reduction in seizures.)

“Ketosis is like an autophagy hack,” Champ says. “You get a lot of the same metabolic changes and benefits of fasting without actually fasting.”

Keto diets are super high fat: Between 60 and 70 percent of one’s overall calories should come from fat. (Lots of steak, bacon, and peanut butter shakes are a definite bonus for the keto crowd.) Protein makes up 20 to 30 percent of calories, while carbs are kept below 50 grams per day.

But if staying in ketosis sounds even harder than not eating at all, take heart. Similar benefits have been noted in people following a diet in which carbs didn’t exceed 30 percent of their overall calories, Champ says.

Is There an Easier Way?

Nah. But there’s a lot money to be made if researchers can distill the benefits of autophagy into a pill, so you can be sure they’re trying.

“Of course people are looking for ways to induce autophagy through chemicals, because it would be easier than dieting,” Klionsky says, but he cautions that we’re a long way off.

Champ notes that anti-epileptic drugs are being developed that mimic the effects of ketosis. If they become available to the broader public, there’s a chance we’ll be able to pop a pill that cranks up autophagy with practically no effort.

Still, don't get your hopes up: “There are so many metabolic changes that take place during ketosis that mimicking all of them with a pill might not be possible,” Champ says. “The bodily stress that comes with entering ketosis might be necessary for the benefits.”

Just remember: You don’t have to fast, stay in ketosis, or exercise intensely all day every day to experience these benefits—even a few hours of any of these activities can help.

The Takeaway

There’s a pretty strong case to be made that stress and self-destruction lengthens your lifespan. “It’s our ancestral and evolutionary response to dealing with feast and famine in times of stress,” Champ says. “Since a lot of these things would kill us, like starvation and exercise, it only makes sense that after millions of years we adapted those mechanisms to make them positive.”

Klionsky notes that there’s still a lot we don’t know about the process, and it’s too early to definitively say that autophagy will cure cancer, make you a genius, and stave off aging for good.

There’s a pretty strong case to be made that stress and self-destruction lengthens your lifespan.

“One fundamental problem is that it is still difficult to monitor autophagy in a living organism, especially a human,” he says.

The bottom line: Regular exercise and occasional carbohydrate restriction carry mountains of benefits in addition to their likely impact on autophagy. The best that could happen is a stronger, leaner, and cleaner body. That’s our kind of detox.

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Autophagy — How Your Body Detoxifies and Repairs Itself

Story at-a-glance

  • The biological process known as autophagy plays a key role in your body’s ability to detoxify, repair, and regenerate itself
  • By activating your body’s autophagy process, you dampen inflammation, slow down the aging process, and optimize biological function
  • Three ways to do that are eating a high-fat, low high-fiber carb diet, intermittently fasting.

By Dr. Mercola

While there are many different ways to rid your body of accumulated toxins, from detoxifying foods and chemical and/or natural detox agents to saunas, a biological process known as autophagy plays a key role.

The term autophagy means "self-eating," and refers to the processes by which your body cleans out various debris, including toxins, and recycles damaged cell components.

The video above provides a more in-depth biochemical review of the autophagy processes involved in health and disease. As explained in layman's terms by Greatist:1

"Your cells create membranes that hunt out scraps of dead, diseased, or worn-out cells; gobble them up; strip 'em for parts; and use the resulting molecules for energy or to make new cell parts."

Dr. Colin Champ, a board-certified radiation oncologist and assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center explains it thus:

"Think of it as our body's innate recycling program. Autophagy makes us more efficient machines to get rid of faulty parts, stop cancerous growths, and stop metabolic dysfunction like obesity and diabetes."

By boosting your body's autophagy process, you dampen inflammation, slow down the aging process, and optimize biological function. As noted by Fight Aging:2

"Greater autophagy taking place in tissue should mean fewer damaged and disarrayed cells at any given moment in time, which in turn should translate to a longer-lasting organism."

Boosting Autophagy Through Exercise

Like the benefits of exercise, autophagy occurs in response to stress. And, in fact, exercise is one of the ways by which you boost autophagy. As you probably know, exercising creates mild damage to your muscles and tissues that your body then repairs, and by so doing makes your body stronger.

Exercise also helps flush out toxins by sweating, and is helpful for just about any detox program. In fact, many consider exercise a foundational aspect of effective detoxification.

Dr. George Yu, for example, who has been involved with clinical trials to help detoxify people from the Gulf War, recommends using a combination of exercise, sauna, and niacin supplementation to maximize elimination of toxins through your skin.

Exercise is an important component as it also causes vasodilation and increased blood flow. Beyond that, as noted in the featured article:

"One study looked at autophagosomes, structures that form around the pieces of cells that the body has decided to recycle.

After engineering mice to have glowing green autophagosomes ... scientists found that the rate at which the mice were healthily demolishing their own cells drastically increased after they ran for 30 minutes on a treadmill.

The rate continued increasing until they'd been running for 80 minutes."

How Much Exercise Do You Need to Optimize Autophagy?

The amount of exercise required to stimulate autophagy in humans is still unknown, however it is believed that intense exercise is more effective than mild exercise, which certainly makes logical sense.

That said, other research has shown that the "Goldilocks zone" in which exercise produces the greatest benefit for longevity is between 150 to 450 minutes of moderate exercise per week, lowering your risk of early death by 31 and 39 percent respectively.

Spending at least 30 percent of your workout on high-intensity exercises has also been shown to further boost longevity by about 13 percent, compared to exercising at a consistently moderate pace all the time.

Following these general guidelines will likely put you in the most advantageous position for maximizing autophagy as well.

How to Radically Inhibit Autophagy

One of the quickest ways to shut down autophagy is to eat large amounts of protein. What this will do is stimulate IGF-1 and mTOR, which are potent inhibitors of autophagy.

That is why it's best to limit your protein to about 40 to 70 grams per day, depending on your lean body mass. The specific formula is one gram of protein for every kilogram of lean body mass, or one-half gram of protein per pound of lean body mass.

Substantial amounts of protein can be found in meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. Some vegetables also contain generous amounts of protein — for example, broccoli. Forty grams of protein is not a large amount of food — it's the equivalent of one six-ounce chicken breast.

To determine whether or not you're getting too much protein, simply calculate your body's requirement based on your lean body mass, and write down everything you eat for a few days. Then calculate the amount of daily protein you've consumed from all sources.

If you're currently averaging a lot more than what is optimal, adjust downward accordingly. The following chart provides a quick overview of how much protein is in various foods.

Red meat, pork, poultry, and seafood average 6 to 9 grams of protein per ounce.

An ideal amount for most people would be a 3-ounce serving of meat or seafood (not 9- or 12-ounce steaks!), which will provide about 18 to 27 grams of protein

Eggs contain about 6 to 8 grams of protein per egg. So an omelet made from two eggs would give you about 12 to 16 grams of protein

If you add cheese, you need to calculate that protein in as well (check the label of your cheese)

Seeds and nuts contain on average 4 to 8 grams of protein per quarter cup

Cooked beans average about 7 to 8 grams per half cup

Cooked grains average 5 to 7 grams per cup

Most vegetables contain about 1 to 2 grams of protein per ounce

The Importance of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

Healthy mitochondria are at the core of staying healthy and preventing disease. Mitochondrial damage can trigger genetic mutations that can contribute to cancer, so optimizing the health of your mitochondria is a key component of cancer prevention. Autophagy is one way to remove damaged mitochondria, but biogenesis is the process by which new healthy mitochondria can be duplicated.

Interestingly, exercise plays a dual role as it not only stimulates autophagy but is also one of the most potent stimulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. It does this by increasing a signal in your body called AMPK, which in turn activates PGC-1 alpha.

By stimulating  your mitochondria — the organelles in nearly every cell that produce ATP — to work harder, your mitochondria start making reactive oxygen species (ROS), which act as signaling molecules. One of the functions they signal is to make more mitochondria.

In essence, the key to preventing disease — virtually  eliminating the risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, many other diseases — and  slowing down the aging process lies in  optimizing mitochondrial function and increasing mitochondrial numbers. Thankfully, exercise helps you do both.

Intermittent Fasting — Another Way to Boost Autophagy

Fasting is another biological stressor that produces many beneficial results, including autophagy. In fact, some of the benefits associated with fasting — such as a reduced risk of diabetes and heart disease — can at least in part be attributed to this process.

While there are many different kinds of intermittent fasting schedules, if you're insulin resistant, my personal recommendation is to fast every day by scheduling all of your eating within a window of approximately 8 hours or less. For example, you could restrict your eating to the hours of 11am and 7pm. This equates to 16 hours of daily fasting.

I used to recommend skipping breakfast, but I've since realized that it probably doesn't matter which meal you skip — breakfast or dinner — as long as you skip one of them. Some really struggle without breakfast, so play around with it and find out what works best for you.  

Eating between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. may work better for some people, and this schedule actually has an added advantage, because you're now fasting for several hours before going to bed. I'm convinced that it's best for most to avoid eating three hours prior to bed, as the last thing you need to be doing is producing energy when you don't need it.

There's compelling evidence showing that when you supply fuel to your mitochondria at a time when they don't need it, they leak a large number of electrons that liberate reactive oxygen species as free radicals.

These free radicals damage your mitochondrial and eventually nuclear DNA. There's also evidence indicating that cancer cells uniformly have damaged mitochondria, so eating too close to bedtime is not a good idea. I personally strive for six hours of fasting before bedtime, but at bare minimum, avoid eating at least three hours before going to bed.

To Boost Autophagy, Switch to a High-Fat, Low-Carb Diet

Nutritional ketogenesis is a third strategy that will help boost autophagy, and to accomplish that, you need to cut down on the non-fiber carbs and increase the amount of healthy fat in your diet, along with a moderate amount of protein. (Many Americans tend to eat far more protein than they need, which will counteract your efforts to get into nutritional ketosis.)  According to Champ:3

"Ketogenesis is like an autophagy hack. You get a lot of the same metabolic changes and benefits of fasting without actually fasting ... Between 60 and 70 percent of one's overall calories should come from [healthy] fat ... Protein makes up 20 to 30 percent of calories, while carbs are kept below 50 grams per day ...  Similar benefits have been noted in people following a diet in which carbs didn't exceed 30 percent of their overall calories."

Most Americans consume harmful fats like processed vegetable oils, which will invariably make your health worse. Not only is it processed, it's very high in omega-6 oils, and excess omega-6 fats will integrate into the inner mitochondrial membrane and become highly susceptible to oxidative damage, causing your mitochondria to die prematurely.

It is best to keep omega-6 fats consumption to less than 4 to 5 percent of your total daily calories Replace the omega-6 fats with healthy fats-  such as natural, unprocessed fat- found in real foods such as seeds, nuts, real butter, olives, avocado, or coconut oil.

It's also important to make the distinction about which carbs we're talking about when we say "low-carb," as vegetables are "carbs" too. However, fiber carbs (i.e. vegetables) will not push your metabolism in the wrong direction — only the non-fiber ones will (think sugars and anything that converts to sugar, such as soda, processed grains, pasta, bread and cookies, for example).

Even more importantly, the fiber is not broken down by sugar but travels down the digestion system, is consumed by bacteria in your intestine, and converted to short chain fats that actually improve your health.

If you look at the nutrition facts on a processed food package, it will list total carbs, and again, that's not what we're talking about. To calculate the dangerous non-fiber carbs, simply subtract the grams of fiber from the grams of total carbohydrate in the food in question. Remember, you do need carbs, but you need most all of them from vegetables, which are also high in fiber.

Autophagy Restores Function in Aging Muscle Stem Cells

It has long been known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle are an important part of the muscle repair process. Previous research4 has shown that exercise affects the behavior of your muscle stem cells, and may help prevent or even restore age-related muscle loss. MSCs in muscle are very responsive to mechanical strain, and these stem cells accumulate in muscle post-exercise.

And, while the MSCs do not directly contribute to building new muscle fibers, they do release growth factors, which encourage other cells to generate new muscle. It's also known that people's muscles tend to become increasingly deficient in MSCs with age, and that autophagy efficiency declines as well. As a result, metabolic waste starts to build up in your cells and tissues.

A recent Spanish study5 reports that satellite cells — muscle stem cells responsible for tissue regeneration — rely on autophagy to prevent the arrest of the cell cycle, known as cellular senescence; a state in which stem cell activity significantly declines. In short, to improve the regeneration of muscle tissue, you need to augment autophagy.

With efficient autophagy — your body's internal cleaning mechanism — your stem cells retain the ability to maintain and repair your tissues.

As reported by Fight Aging:6

"The researchers demonstrated that restoring youthful levels of autophagy in old satellite cell populations can restore them from senescence and return their regenerative capabilities ... The paper ... is one of the more compelling of recent arguments for putting more effort into treatments based on artificially increased levels of autophagy ...

[M]any of the methods known to modestly slow aging in laboratory species are associated with increased levels of autophagy. It is a vital component in hormesis, wherein causing a little damage leads to a lasting increase in autophagy and a net gain. Stem cells spend much of their time in a state of quiescence, only springing into action when called upon.

This helps to preserve them for the long term. In older tissues with greater levels of molecular damage, ever more stem cells slip from quiescence into an irreversible senescent state. These senescent cells are no longer capable of generating new cells, and start to secrete all sorts of harmful signal molecules."

Health and Longevity Are Rooted in Mitochondrial Function

The take-home message here is that your lifestyle determines your fate in terms of how long you'll live and, ultimately, how healthy those years will be. For optimal health and disease prevention, you need healthy mitochondria and efficient autophagy (cellular cleaning and recycling), and three key lifestyle factors that have a beneficial effect on both are:

  1. What you eat: A diet high in quality fats, moderate in protein, and low in non-fiber carbs. Eating organic and grass-fed is also important, as commonly used pesticides like glyphosate cause mitochondrial damage
  2. When you eat: Daily intermittent fasting tends to be the easiest to adhere to, but any fasting schedule that you will consistently follow will work
  3. Exercise, with high intensity interval exercises being the most effective
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 21 2017 at 2:19pm

Why Are Eggs Good For You? An Egg-ceptional Superfood

Many healthy foods have been unfairly demonized in the past.

This includes coconut oil, cheese and unprocessed meat, to name a few.

But probably the worst example is the false claims about eggs, which are among the healthiest foods on the planet.

2

Eggs Do Not Cause Heart Disease

Historically, eggs have been considered unhealthy because they contain cholesterol.

A large egg contains 212 mg of cholesterol, which is a lot compared to most other foods.

However, it has been shown in many studies that eggs and dietary cholesterol do not adversely affect cholesterol levels in the blood.

In fact, eggs raise HDL (the good) cholesterol. They also change LDL cholesterol from small, dense LDL (which is bad) to large LDL, which is benign (123).

A new meta-analysis published in 2013 looked at 17 prospective studies on egg consumption and health. They discovered that eggs had no association with either heart disease or stroke in otherwise healthy people (4).

This isn't new data. Multiple older studies have led to the same conclusion (5).

Bottom Line: Despite the false claim of the past few decades, eating eggs has no association with heart disease.

3

Eggs Are Rich in Unique Antioxidants

Eggs are particularly rich in the two antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin.

These antioxidants gather in the retina of the eye and protect against the eye diseases macular degeneration and cataracts (678).

In one study, supplementing with an average of 1.3 egg yolks per day for 4.5 weeks increased blood levels of lutein by 28-50% and zeaxanthin by 114-142% (9).

Bottom Line: Eggs contain large amounts of the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which dramatically lower your risk of age-related eye disorders.

4

Eggs Are Among The Most Nutritious Foods on The Planet

Just think about it, one egg contains all the nutrients and building blocks required to grow an entire baby chicken.

Eggs are loaded with high-quality proteins, vitamins, minerals, good fats and various trace nutrients.

A large egg contains (10):

  • Only 77 calories, with 5 grams of fat and 6 grams of protein with all 9 essential amino acids.
  • Rich in iron, phosphorous, selenium and vitamins A, B12, B2 and B5 (among others).
  • One egg contains 113 mg of choline, a very important nutrient for the brain, among other things. A study revealed that 90% of Americans may not get enough choline in their diet (11).
If you decide to include eggs in your diet (you should) then make sure to eat omega-3 enriched or pastured eggs. They are much more nutritious than eggs from factory-raised chickens.

Make sure to eat the yolks, because they contain pretty much all the nutrients!

Bottom Line: Eggs contain all 9 essential amino acids, are highly concentrated with vitamins and minerals and are among the best sources of choline you can get. Omega-3 enriched or pastured eggs are best.

5

Eggs Are Filling and Help You Lose Weight

Eggs score high on a scale called the satiety index, which means that eggs are particularly capable of making you feel full and eat fewer overall calories (12).

Eggs only contain trace amounts of carbohydrates, which means that they will not raise blood glucose levels.

In a study of 30 overweight or obese women that ate either a bagel or eggs for breakfast, the egg group ended up eating less during lunch, the rest of the day and for the next 36 hours (13).

In another study, overweight men and women were calorie-restricted and given either a breakfast of 2 eggs (340 kcal) or an isocaloric breakfast of bagels. After 8 weeks, the egg eating group had a (14):

  • 61% greater reduction in BMI.
  • 65% more weight loss.
  • 34% greater reduction in waist circumference.
  • 16% greater reduction in body fat.
These results were found even though both breakfasts contained the same number of calories
Bottom Line: Eggs are a nutritious, protein-rich food with a strong impact on satiety. Studies show that eating eggs for breakfast can help you lose weight.

6

An Egg-ceptional Superfood

If you need any more reasons to eat eggs, they are cheap, go with almost any food and taste awesome.

If there was any food I'd be willing to classify as a superfood, it would be eggs.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 28 2017 at 4:34pm
I am still eating LCHF,  but had an unusual last week.  Working nights then days most likely confused my 'everything'.   Eating at 2 am is not appealing.  I skipped a lot of meals.  My sleep pattern was topsy turvy.  Still somehow managed to lose 1lb
Recovering from all that chaos today,  but doing it with Wine.  Just could not resist Embarrassed Wink.  I am aware that it will cause a setback, and I will no longer be in ketosis,  but I will get over it.......... eventually.  

Wink Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 31 2017 at 11:17am
Wine fest over Cry Cry.   What I've noticed...The wine made me thirsty,  I drank loads of water,  but did not urinate adequately for the amount of water I was drinking.   Needless to say I was not having 'meals'.   When I got hungry,  I had a piece of meat of fish, no veg or salads. 
Yesterday (Wed.)  morning I got on the scale which showed a 4 lb gain !! Shocked   After the initial shock wore off,  I remembered drinking copious amounts of water and not eliminating it Clap.   I was not hungry most of the day,  but decided when I got hungry I will keep it lite,  and have homemade chicken broth with beaten eggs (my version of egg drop soup).   However, around 5 pm I felt a twinge of hunger,  and could not be bothered with the soup,  I had some sugar-free Jello instead.  Surprisingly,  that was sufficient Shocked.   It was not hunger at all,  it was my body saying "Hey, isn't this the time you normally feed me???"   What I learned was....All those days when I ate my one meal whether I was hungry or not,  I ate anyway because I did not want to become hungry later and have to eat too late.   I survived quite comfortably for over 24 hours on a bit of 20 calorie Jello ShockedShocked.  
It has now been over 36 hours since I had a piece of steamed Fish (Tues evening),  except for the Jello yesterday,  and still not hungry.   Now I no longer fear going without a meal for a day if I am not hungry.  That is what being in ketosis is about.
By the way, this morning I lost 2 of the 4 lb gained.   It was just water.  Well, some of it anyway.   Let's see what the other 2 lbs is all about.

Wink Wink




Edited by Benni - Aug 31 2017 at 11:30am
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