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Job Hopping is the New Black

 
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SamoneLenior View Drop Down
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    Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 6:08am

Why Job Hoppers Make the Best Employees


1. Job hoppers have more intellectually rewarding careers.
In almost any job, the learning curve is very steep early on. And then it goes flat. So by the end of two years at the same job, you often have little left to learn. Which makes me wonder what people are doing to keep their brains alive if they stay at the same job for 20 years. It also makes me certain that job hoppers know more.

If you change jobs often, then you're always challenged with a lot to learn -- your learning curve stays high. This is true for office skills, and industry specific knowledge. It also applies to your emotional intelligence. The more you have to navigate corporate hierarchies and deal with office dramas, the more you learn about people and the better you will become at making people comfortable at work. And that's a great skill to have.

2. Job hoppers have more stable careers.
Corporate America doesn't provide stability for its employees. The only people who think it does are really old and completely out of touch. There are layoffs and downsizing and just-in-time hiring and contract workers -- realities that barely existed a generation ago. The stability you get in your career comes from you. If you're counting on some company to give you stability, realizing this is scary. But if you believe in yourself and your abilities and treat your career with this understanding, then it's no problem. You can create career stability -- you just have to do it on your own.

The way you do that is through networking. Because you can be sure you'll need to find many jobs in your lifetime, you want network as efficiently as you can. After all, the most efficient way to find a job is through a network. It's how most people land jobs. People who work for lots of companies have a larger network than people who stay in one place for long periods of time. Which is why job-hopping creates stability.

3. Job hoppers are higher performers.
If you know you are going to leave your job in the next year, you're going to be very conscious of your resume -- that is, what skills you're tackling, what you're achieving, whether you're becoming an expert in your field. These issues do not generally concern someone who has been in a job for five years and knows he's going to stay another five years. So job hoppers are always looking to do really well at work, if for no other reason than it helps them get their next job.

You can't job hop if don't add value each place you go. That's why job hoppers are usually overachievers on projects they are involved in; they want something good to put on their resume. So from employers' perspective, this is a good thing. Companies benefit more from having a strong performer for 18 months than a mediocre employee for 20 years. (And don't tell me people can't get up to speed fast enough to contribute. Fix that. It's an outdated model and won't attract good employees.)

4. Job hoppers are more loyal.
Loyalty is caring about the people you're with, right? Job hoppers are generally great team players because that's all they have. Job hoppers don't identify with a company's long-term performance, they identify with their work group's short-term performance. Job hoppers want their boss to adore them so they get a good reference. Job hoppers want to bond with their co-workers so they can all help each other get jobs later on. And job hoppers want to make sure everyone who comes into contact with them has a good experience with them; it's not like they have ten years on the job to fix a first impression.

This is why job hoppers care more about their co-workers and will go further to make them happy than long-term employees. And it if you think about it, this makes sense for a company, too: The company isn't hiring you with any decade-long commitment, so you would be foolish to think you have to give one.

5. Job hoppers are more emotionally mature.
It takes a good deal of self-knowledge to know what you want to do next, and to choose to go get it rather than stay someplace that for the moment seems safe. It takes commitment to personal growth to give up career complacency and embrace a challenging learning curve throughout your career -- over and over. And it's a brave person who can tell someone, "I know I've only been working here for a month, but it's not right for me, so I'm leaving."

Doubtless you'll hear that you should stick it out, show some loyalty, give it at least a year or two. But why should you take time out of your life to spend your days doing something you know is not right for you?

It is okay to quit. No career is interesting if it's not engaging and challenging, and your most important job is to find that -- over and over. Do not settle for outdated workplace models that accept complacency and downplay self-knowledge. Sure, the job market is tough nowadays - but that's no reason to settle.


Job Hopping Is the 'New Normal' for Millennials: Three Ways to Prevent a Human Resource Nightmare


The average worker today stays at each of his or her jobs for 4.4 years, according to the most recent available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but the expected tenure of the workforce’s youngest employees is about half that.

Ninety-one percent of Millennials (born between 1977-1997) expect to stay in a job for less than three years, according to the Future Workplace “Multiple Generations @ Work” survey of 1,189 employees and 150 managers. That means they would have 15 – 20 jobs over the course of their working lives!

So what would all this job-hopping do for young workers’ careers? For applicants, job instability on a resume could come at the cost of the dream job. For years, experts have warned that recruiters screen out chronic job-hoppers, instead seeking prospective employees who seem to offer longevity.

Talent acquisition managers and heads of Human Resources make a valid case for their wariness of resumes filled with 1-2-year stints. They question such applicants’ motivation, skill level, engagement on the-job and ability to get along with other colleagues.

These hiring managers worry they’ll become the next victims of these applicant’s hit-and-run jobholding. For companies, losing an employee after a year means wasting precious time and resources on training & development, only to lose the employee before that investment pays off. Plus, many recruiters may assume the employee didn’t have time to learn much at a one-year job.

The Upside of Job Hopping

But for newly minted college graduates, job-hopping can speed career advancement. According to a paper out of the St. Olaf’s Sociology Department entitled “Hiring, Promotion, and Progress: Millennials’ Expectations in the Workplace,” changing jobs and getting a promotion in the process allows Gen Y employees to avoid the “dues paying” that can trap workers in a painfully slow ascent up the corporate ladder.

Job hopping can also lead to greater job fulfillment, which is more important to Gen Y workers than it was to any previous generation: A 2012 survey by Net Impactfound that 88 percent of workers considered “positive culture” important or essential to their dream job, and 86 percent said the same for work they found “interesting.” Job-hopping helps workers reach both of these goals, because it means trying out a variety of roles and workplaces while learning new skills along the way.

And economic instability has erased, especially for younger workers, the stigma that has accompanied leaving a job early. That’s because strategic hopping been all but necessary for as long as they can remember. Workers today know they could be laid off at any time – after all, they saw it happen to their parents – so they plan defensively and essentially consider themselves “free agents.

If that freedom seems an undue privilege, think again. The downside to the freedom they enjoy is financial insecurity worse than any other generation in the past half-century. That’s a sufficient price to pay.

So while Baby Boomers started working with an eye on gaining stability, raising a family, and “settling down,” today’s young workers take none of that for granted. Instead, as shown by Net Impact’s survey, they are more concerned than their predecessors with finding happiness and fulfillment in their work lives.




Edited by SamoneLenior - Jun 29 2014 at 6:25am
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SamoneLenior View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 6:12am

Employees Who Stay In Companies Longer Than Two Years Get Paid 50% Less


The worst kept secret is that employees are making less on average every year. There are millions of reasons for this, but we’re going to focus on one that we can control. Staying employed at the same company for over two years on average is going to make you earn less over your lifetime by about 50% or more.

Keep in mind that 50% is a conservative number at the lowest end of the spectrum.  This is assuming that your career is only going to last 10 years.  The longer you work, the greater the difference will become over your lifetime.

Arguments for Changing Jobs

The average raise an employee can expect in 2014 is 3%. Even the most underperforming employee can expect a 1.3% raise. The best performers can hope for a 4.5% raise.  But, the inflation rate is currently 2.1% calculated based on the Consumer Price Index published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This means that your raise is actually less than 1%.  This is probably sobering enough to make you reach for a drink.

In 2014, the average employee is going to earn less than a 1% raise and there is very little that we can do to change management’s decision. But, we can decide whether we want to stay at a company that is going to give us a raise for less than 1%. The average raise an employee receives for leaving is between a 10% to 20% increase in salary. Obviously, there are extreme cases where people receive upwards of 50%, but this depends on each person’s individual circumstances and industries.

Assumes your career will last 10 years. An avg 3% raise and a conservative 10% raise per transition.

Why are people who jump ship rewarded, when loyal employees are punished for their dedication? The answer is simple. Recessions allow businesses to freeze their payroll and decrease salaries of the newly hired based on “market trends.” These reactions to the recession are understandable, but the problem is that these reactions were meant to be “temporary.” Instead they have become the “norm” in the marketplace. More importantly, we have all become used to hearing about “3% raises” and we’ve accepted it as the new “norm.”

John Hollon, former editor of Workforce.com, remembers when “5% was considered an average annual pay increase.” The amount of fear the media created surrounding the recession and its length has given companies the perfect excuse to shrink payroll and lower employee salary expectations in the long-run.

The world is desperate for skilled labor and companies around the globe are starving for talent.  Companies can tout technology replacing labor, but it is only exacerbating the global shortage of human capital and skilled workers. This means that we as employees are positioned better than ever to leverage our abilities for increased pay.

The Forbes eBook To Succeed In A Brutal Job Market 
Don’t let a rotten economy spoil your goals. Use the career and money advice in The Millennial Game Plan to get and stay ahead for good.

Bethany Devine, a Senior Hiring Manager in Silicon Valley, CA who has worked withIntuit and other Fortune 500 companies explains, “I would often see resumes that only had a few years at each company. I found that the people who had switched companies usually commanded a higher salary. The problem with staying at a company forever is you start with a base salary and usually annual raises are based on a percentage of your current salary. There is often a limit to how high your manager can bump you up since it’s based on a percentage of your current salary. However, if you move to another company, you start fresh and can usually command a higher base salary to hire you. Companies competing for talent are often not afraid to pay more when hiring if it means they can hire the best talent. Same thing applies for titles. Some companies have a limit to how many promotions they allow each year. Once you are entrenched in a company, it may become more difficult to be promoted as you may be waiting in line behind others who should have been promoted a year ago but were not due to the limit. However, if you apply to another company, your skills may match the higher title, and that company will hire you with the new title. I have seen many coworkers who were waiting on a certain title and finally received it the day they left and were hired at a new company.”

Even more importantly, when I asked Devine her thoughts on employees who had remained in the same company for periods long past the two year mark, she explained that she did feel that some were “underpaid” or had the potential to earn more.

Jessica Derkis started her career earning $8 per hour ($16,640 annual salary) as the YMCA’s marketing manager.  Over 10 years, she’s changed employers five times to ultimately earn $72,000 per year at her most recent marketing position.  This is approximately a 430% increase over a 10 year career.  Derkis’ most recent transition resulted in a 50% increase to her salary.  Derkis’ is a great example of how “owning your career” can make a huge difference in your income and career path.


Edited by SamoneLenior - Jun 29 2014 at 10:55am
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ThoughtCouture View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote ThoughtCouture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 6:34am
the article didn't seem to touch on the stress associated with adjusting to new bosses, systems and company cultures.  this was actually the main reason i avoided hopping.  having a "trained" boss was actually very valuable to me.
 
 
but generally i agree with the article if career advancement/money is the ultimate goal.   i'd go one step further and say if you are willing to relocate i've found that you can make even more...

Edited by ThoughtCouture - Jun 29 2014 at 6:35am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote ThoughtCouture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 6:39am
Dead @ the title switch
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Sang Froid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 6:39am
I'mma be job hoppin' like a mug. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ThoughtCouture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 6:46am
oh and when i say relocate i mean someplace most people don't wanna go...lol

Edited by ThoughtCouture - Jun 29 2014 at 6:46am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 6:46am
we used to job hop. It's old black lol
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 7:02am

lol purp

my dad did (you all are/were in the same field) but my mom did not

since I posted three different articles I changed the title
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote ShadyLady Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 8:35am
I used to job hop like a mutha. If I found something with more growth potential, more money, or felt like my job was in danger, I'd get the hell on.

I think I'm somewhere stable now, but I'll buck in a heartbeat if I need to.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PurplePhase Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2014 at 8:44am
If they want you they'll take what they can get lol
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