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socophoenix View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:21pm
soy dominicana*raises hand*

but only 1/2 of the way, if someone asks, i name all my ethnicities, but since dominican is the predominant one, i generally say that if im asked, but i include myself as black at every chance i get.
as far as looks, my dominican side of the fam ranges from red clay colored(my dad) to jennifer lopez(my aunts) to a beautiful caramel complexion(me, sis, cousins)

everything is a variety, and to think otherwise is so ignorant
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indiecat View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:23pm
people are soo uneducated these days.

seriously, its sad. they must have been asleep in history and geography classes.

i think the people who wont identify as blacks, maybe just confused. but those who blatantly say they are not and clearly they are need a reality check.

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Zupreme View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:25pm
Originally posted by indiecat indiecat wrote:

people are soo uneducated these days.

seriously, its sad. they must have been asleep in history and geography classes.

i think the people who wont identify as blacks, maybe just confused.
but those who blatantly say they are not and clearly they are need a
reality check.





its more complex than a simple reality check. as i mentioned, history books there dont evenmenton slavery as if it never happened. we're talking about over 500 years of mass delusion (as misscassc called it) being passed on from generation to generation without ever being questioned ...
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:27pm
My mom is  Afro Cuban and when i was little some of my friends would say " I didnt that PR, DR and Cuba had black people".
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:27pm
Originally posted by Zupreme Zupreme wrote:

Originally posted by indiecat indiecat wrote:

people are soo uneducated these days.

seriously, its sad. they must have been asleep in history and geography classes.

i think the people who wont identify as blacks, maybe just confused.
but those who blatantly say they are not and clearly they are need a
reality check.





its more complex than a simple reality check. as i mentioned, history books there dont evenmenton slavery as if it never happened. we're talking about over 500 years of mass delusion (as misscassc called it) being passed on from generation to generation without ever being questioned ...



thats awful, i hadnt known that. they wont know who they really are. do u know if anyone is trying to change that there? especially in the schools. its bad to play w/ the mind of a child like that...not tell them stuff.


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:30pm
Originally posted by coconutmilk coconutmilk wrote:

Originally posted by Star007 Star007 wrote:

so I'm at the sub shop across the street from my campus and these two older black men pull up in their Benz, they stand in line right behind me and immediately start trying to talk to me "Why you look so mean?" "What we did to you" then the other one says "That some nice hair on yo head" the other one says "that aint her hair that's a weave", I'm just trying to put my order in and get my food (I'm 15 weeks pregnant so I MUST eat, lol). then one of them asks me "where you from?" I respond "Dominican Republic" and then he says "I aint never seen a black dominican" I was like "REALLY? wow." I didnt know that dominicans were supposed to look a different way, last time I checked being dominican was a NATIONALITY, not a COLOR. If you've ever visited the DR you'll see people of all colors, from charcoal black to pasty white and everything in between. lol.

 
 
You  should  have  told  them  that  your  hair  is  none  of  their  business  or  their  preceived  license  to  discuss  it  in  front  of  you.  But  that's  besides  the  point.  At  my  last  job,  I  did  work  with  a  guy  who  is  Dominican;  but  by  birth  there;  he  wasn't  a  first-generation  American.   He  denied  being  black  as  well,  although  anyone  with  both  their  eyes  functioning  properly  could  tell   that  he  is.   He  is  darker  than  me  and  appears  to  have  the  same  afro-ish  textured  hair  like  mine;  the  only difference    is  that  he  has  finer  features  and  yet  he  still  denied  his  African  ancestry  and  just  only  mentioned  his  Spanish  or  Spaniard  ancestors. ConfusedConfusedConfusedConfused  That's  what  turned  me  off  about  this  person.   I'm  proud  of  being  black  and  wouldn't  want  to  trade  race  if  I  could  because  I  wouldn't  be  me.  So  naturally,  I  have  no  tolerance  with  someone  who  outright  denies  their  African  blood,  even  if  they're  bi-racial/ muti-racial.  If  I  were  to  date  a  Dominican,  Cuban,  Puerto  Rican,  Honduran,  Nicaraguan,  or  Colombian  or  whatever  who  was  clearly  black  and  yet  denied  it,  then  I  would  have  to  re-evaluate  our  relationship  because  I  embrace  my  blackness  and  I  don't  have  the  time  nor  the  energy  to  deal  with  self-hatred;  I  might  be  patient  up  to  a  point;  although,  I  wouldn't  know  how  much  longer.
 
 
 
 
If you were to call anyone in my Cuban family "Black" it would be like throwing a pot of hot grits on them.
 
My mother is the black sheep of the family because she isnt in denial like the rest of the family.
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Zupreme View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:31pm
Originally posted by indiecat indiecat wrote:


Originally posted by Zupreme Zupreme wrote:

Originally posted by indiecat indiecat wrote:

people are soo uneducated these days.

seriously, its sad. they must have been asleep in history and geography classes.

i think the people who wont identify as blacks, maybe just confused.
but those who blatantly say they are not and clearly they are need a
reality check.





its more complex than a simple reality check. as i mentioned,
history books there dont evenmenton slavery as if it never happened.
we're talking about over 500 years of mass delusion (as misscassc
called it) being passed on from generation to generation without ever
being questioned ...



thats awful, i hadnt known that. they wont know who they really are. do
u know if anyone is trying to change that there? especially in the
schools. its bad to play w/ the mind of a child like that...not tell
them stuff.





people there look at me cock-eyed when i speak of ANY kind of pride as far as my being black goes. thats just unheard of. embracing something they deem so "ugly and upleasant" seems crazy to them.... its like saying "im proud to be a gorilla!" that sounds f*cked up but thats really how it goes.

there really is no movement or will to change. its simply what it is, sadly...

even the fact that i stopped relaxing my hair was looked at as just RIDICULOUS. as if i have no right to like my hair as it is. its just not changing at all...only dominicans raised in america have a little bit more of a concept of it...

Edited by Zupreme - Jun 19 2008 at 7:32pm
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Roro View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:31pm
^^^^that is so funny.....yrs ago I worked w/ a girl who was BLACK Guyanese .......she swear she is Indian but I look more Indian than her so I was likeErmm....I know she has Indian background but it's NOT as apparent as she liked to think it was.....she always wore her relaxed hair out and acted like it was so long and flowing.....it was bout shoulder length and not like really bouncy or anything, my hair was longer than hers  and I consider myself Black.....then she said she will not have a child w/ a black man.....that took the cakeLOL but I don't blame her considering she is from a nice area where there aren't many blacks and the black men that were at that job were nothing to write home about....but she had a complex for real

Edited by Roro - Jun 19 2008 at 7:32pm
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Don Imus View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:41pm
Originally posted by socophoenix socophoenix wrote:

soy dominicana*raises hand*

but only 1/2 of the way, if someone asks, i name all my ethnicities, but since dominican is the predominant one, i generally say that if im asked, but i include myself as black at every chance i get.
as far as looks, my dominican side of the fam ranges from red clay colored(my dad) to jennifer lopez(my aunts) to a beautiful caramel complexion(me, sis, cousins)

everything is a variety, and to think otherwise is so ignorant


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coconutmilk View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2008 at 7:45pm
Originally posted by Zupreme Zupreme wrote:

coconutmilk, unfortch that denial is passed on as part of the culture....its extremely hard to shake for most folks...no justification but when when you grow up in a world where EVERYONE shares that sentiment its harder to really understand how wrong it is...'

eta: unlike in the u.s., over there, there hasnt ever been a "black pride" movement. its completely absent...in fact the histroy books dont even mention slavery as if it never happened. its a totally different mindset...
 
 
It's  understandable.  Yet  I'm  sure  before  the  "black  pride"  movement  black  people  still  knew  who  they  were;  although,  they  probably  wished  they  could  erase  their  black  skin.  It's  interesting  about  the  history  books  though.   I  never  knew  that;   so  that's  why  Pedro (the  Dominican  guy  I  mentioned  earlier)  is  rejects  being  black;  then  that  makes  sense  if  all  you're  taught  and  told  about  is  the  European  and/or  Taino/Arawak  heritages.   I  saw  a  documentary  on  PBS  a  few  years  ago  about  the  Dominican  Republic.   I  saw  bits  and  pieces  of  it.   I  remember  they  had  this  one  man  saying  that  Dominicans  aren't  black;  and  also  mentioned  that  their  western  neighbor: Haiti  and  the  inhabitants:  the  Haitians  are  black  and  that  they  don't  want  to  be  assocaiated  with  them.  Inside  I  was  ConfusedConfusedConfused.  Especially  when  this  man  had  the  skin  tone  of  a  coffee  bean,  african  features,  and  kinky  hair.  He  looked  just  like  his  neighbors  to  the  west.   Also,  it  showed  a  fair-skinned,  European-looking  Dominican  woman  and  her  black,  dark-skinned  Dominican  husband  state  that  how  her  family  didn't  approve  of  their  relationship  because  of  how  dark  he  is;  and  yet  despite  the  fact  of  her  family's  disapproval,  she  married  the  man  that  she  fell  in  love  with.  They  had  a  beautiful  daughter  and  she  was  the  beautiful  combination  skin  hue  of  both  her  parents.   
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