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Girl, 7, sent home over locs

 
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mizzsandra00 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote mizzsandra00 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 09 2013 at 12:28am
That long ass response just proved my point......hop off that soap box and into a chair.
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foxyroy19 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote foxyroy19 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 09 2013 at 12:49am

LOL

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote foxyroy19 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 09 2013 at 12:55am
Doesn't say where to donate money...sigh.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carolina cutie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2013 at 1:18pm
Just heard on msnbc that the school is changing its policy on faddish hair styles (you know, black hairstyles) after the media backlash and public outcry.Thumbs Up

I believe Tiana and her father will be appearing on Tamron Hall before 3pm to discuss this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (5) Thanks(5)   Quote AmiliaCabral Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2013 at 1:27pm

I had locs or whatever you call em when I was in elementary school, and this Romanian nun told my mom that my hair made me look homeless. Ma duke went up to the school and ended up tossing a bookshelf on that ho. What she shoulda did was cause a stir and maybe had a lawsuit or something cuz I def got expelled for that  Disapprove

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote BrownQtee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2013 at 1:29pm
lmao!! Good for that nun. I bet her holy ass wasn't expecting a peice of furniture to the head. Clap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nekamarie83 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2013 at 2:03pm
Originally posted by carolina cutie carolina cutie wrote:

Just heard on msnbc that the school is changing its policy on faddish hair styles (you know, black hairstyles) after the media backlash and public outcry.Thumbs Up

I believe Tiana and her father will be appearing on Tamron Hall before 3pm to discuss this.
Originally posted by news on 6 news on 6 wrote:

Tulsa Charter School Board Votes To Change Controversial Dress Code Policy

Posted: Sep 09, 2013 5:02 PM CDT
Updated: Sep 09, 2013 10:19 PM CDT
NewsOn6.com - email

TULSA, Oklahoma - The response a 7-year-old Tulsa girl got from her school over her hairstyle has gotten national attention and prompted the school to change its dress code policy.

Administrators and school board officials met Monday night, after the dress code policy at Deborah Brown Community School came into question.

Her parents said 7-year-old Tiana Parker came home in tears after receiving a verbal warning about her dreadlocks being against school policy.

The school's dress code policy did state that "faddish" hairstyles like afros and dreadlocks are unacceptable.

The board voted Monday night to change the policy as it pertains to hairstyles, saying its a personal hygiene issue, instead of specifying what styles are allowed.

The policy now reads:

"Each student and the parents/guardians of the student are responsible for the personal hygiene of the student. The Administration reserves the right to contact the parents/guardians regarding any personal hygiene issues that it believes causes a risk to the health, safety and welfare of the student, his or her classmates, and faculty or staff or detracts from the educational environment."

Tiana's parents pulled her from the school after they disagreed with how the school handled the way she wore her hair.

Tiana's story was then picked up by sites national news sites and blogs Huffington Post, Jezebel and DailyKos, with many readers jumping to the girl's defense and expressing outrage over the policy, saying that style was one of few that she could wear without using chemicals on her hair.

Langston University is a sponsor of the Deborah Brown Community School.

Langston President Kent Smith said in a statement after the vote: "The action taken today by the board of the Deborah Brown Charter School to amend the policy which resulted in the unfortunate disciplining of a young lady for the style of her hair is commendable. I appreciate the quick action. The amended policy reflects the respect we have at Langston University for our students and their individuality."

The university said the dress code policy was created at Deborah Brown Community School.

Tiana Parker's family said in a statement Monday that, even if the policy is changed, Tiana will not be coming back to Deborah Brown Community School:

"If the policy changes and locs and afros are allowed, we will of course be happy for future students and family's at Deborah Brown Community School. However, that does not change the fact that our 7-year-old daughter, Tiana, was made to feel that there was something wrong with her appearance, in turn coming home in tears. Even now, we have not been contacted by any of the administrators at Deborah Brown Community School nor has an apology been made to our daughter.

Regarding next steps, our focus is on Tiana and all of the "Tianas" in the world who have ever been made to feel this way. This is now much bigger than Tiana, and we know that the conversation cannot end here."

The school board apologized and said they only wants what's best for Tiana.   <--


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote texasmami0117 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 16 2013 at 11:40am
Dr. Yaba Blay
 
Yaba Blay
 
Black women’s hair has made the news again. In the same week that Sheryl Underwood, comedian and co-host of The Talk (CBS) referred to “afro hair” as “curly, nappy, beaded…nasty,” a 7-year-old girl in Tulsa, Oklahoma was sent home from her African-Amerian led charter school because according to school officials and school policy, her dreadlocks are “unacceptable.”

When I first heard this story (sans the video), I, like so many others, became angry. But when I watched the news story, and saw little Tiana in tears, head hung low, I became saddened. Had I not seen the story come to life in that way, I would have likely kept my focus on the school, its administrators, and its offensive, anti-Black policy. But seeing that precious little brown girl break down and cry in front of news cameras, seemingly a day or so at least after the incident occurred, I became instantly focused on her. And her spirit. And her self-reflection. And I wanted to do something for her.

Here is that something. A care package of sorts. A digital book of photos and messages from 111 women and girls from all over the country and all over the world, all of whom wear their hair in locs, all of whom want Tiana to know that she and her hair are PERFECT.

The e-book is nothing short of amazing. The outpouring of support from women from all walks of life, as well as letters from little girls Tiana’s age, goes to show that there’s nothing “faddish” about dreadlocks.  The letters come from artists, doctors, and even acclaimed director Ava Duvernay.  At the end of the book, Alice Walker allowed for a special message to be printed just for Tiana.
 
Of course, I will send this care package to Tiana’s father and ask that he give it to her on our behalf, but I’m also going to send it to administrators at Deborah Brown Community School, as well as administrators at Langston University, a historically Black university under which the school is chartered.

I also ask that you share this with your networks because as much as this is for Tiana, it is not just about Tiana. Tiana’s story is the one that made the news. Our girls are under attack everywhere. I want them all to know that they have an army of sisters, cousins, aunties, Mamas, GrandMamas, and elders all over the world who support them and at the drop of a dime (or a news story) will have their back.

UPDATE: So many women and girls have reached out to me since I shared the care package asking to be included. For now, the care package is all wrapped up. We’ll see what the Universe has in store for this project, but in the meantime, PLEASE share your photos and messages of love with the growing Facebook community We Love Tiana & her Hair. 

Our girls need constant affirmation. They need to know that even though there are people in this world that would have us believe that our natural hair is “ugly” and “nasty,” that it is they who have a problem – not our girls. Not us.

As I did back in December, as I do almost every day, I’m calling on EVERYONE to join me in “singing a Black girl’s song,” not only for Tiana, but for all the little girls who could benefit from the affirmation of their beauty and their value. An intimate weaving of past and present, memory and contemporary, their stories are our stories. Perhaps if they know that we truly understand, they can be encouraged to see themselves through our eyes; perhaps they will soon be able to see themselves for what they are – Pretty Brown Girls.

Not matter her hair texture, length, color, or style, please, in some way, tell a little Black girl that she is beautiful today. And every day.

The beautiful Tiana Parker
Image: Tiana Parker
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CherryBlossom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 16 2013 at 11:47am
Originally posted by AmiliaCabral AmiliaCabral wrote:

I had locs or whatever you call em when I was in elementary school, and this Romanian nun told my mom that my hair made me look homeless. Ma duke went up to the school and ended up tossing a bookshelf on that ho. What she shoulda did was cause a stir and maybe had a lawsuit or something cuz I def got expelled for that  Disapprove


ClapLOL
the nun can explain herself to Jesus lol
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