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Fewer Black children recieve antibiotics-study

 
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Tbaby View Drop Down
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    Posted: Mar 23 2013 at 6:00pm
Racism in medicine: I thought this was an interesting article about the differences in treating respiratory illnesses in our children.  The wrong or underdiagnosis of illnesses in our kids is very disturbing!Angry

Black children are less likely to receive a prescription antibiotic than their nonblack counterparts — even when treated by the same health provider — according to a study published today in Pediatrics.

The findings are based on 1.3 million doctor visits with the same 222 providers, and were independent of age, gender or type of insurance.

This is not the first time research has shown racial biases among health professionals. A smaller study at the University of Washington, showed that unconscious racial biases affected the amount of pain medication given to black children when they needed it. And a Johns Hopkins study highlighted that primary physicians with unconscious racial biases tended to dominate conversations with black patients, ignore their social needs and exclude them from the decision-making process.

However, today’s study is one of the few to look at its effects on respiratory infections and antibiotic use in children.

“Our goal has always been to find ways to improve antibiotic prescribing for children,” says study author Dr. Jeffrey S. Gerber, who is also assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases.

“These analyses [then] revealed the differences in prescribing by race.”

Although, what this study has uncovered may not be a negative. In the age of antibiotic overprescribing and the fear that unnecessary antibiotics later lead to “superbugs” that are too strong to treat, this may in fact be a good thing.

“Overprescribing of antibiotics to children with [respiratory tract infections] is common,” Gerber says.

He and his team suspect that the racial discrepancy may mean that non-black children are being prescribed too many antibiotics — not that black children are being deprived of necessary antibiotics. However, more research is needed to prove their theory.

The question still remains: why are black children receiving different treatments?

“The doctor-patient relationship is complex,” Gerber says. “Differences in parental expectations (‘My child needs antibiotics’), physician perception of parental expectations (‘This parent is going to demand antibiotics’), or the use of shared decision-making (‘Here are the options. Lets decide together how to proceed’) that correlate with patient race could account for some or most of the differential prescribing rates.”

The study did not identify the races of the treating health providers.

John Hoberman, professor of Germanic Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, examines racial biases among physicians in his book, Black & Blue: The Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism. Last year, in a release, he explains that until medical school curricula acknowledge historical medical racism and include new perspectives, enlightenment about these issues won’t occur.

The problem in Gerber’s study could also exist because the providers were missing the diagnosis altogether. Compared with nonblack children, the healthcare providers in Gerber’s study were also significantly less likely to diagnose an acute respiratory tract infection in their black pediatric patients.

So, in order to at least level the field on the prescribing issue, Gerber’s hope is that, in creating specific guidelines for physicians to follow when prescribing antibiotics, it will leave less to interpretation and that the discrepancies will ultimately improve.

“We are currently analyzing a study designed to do this,” he says.

http://thegrio.com/2013/03/18/fewer-black-children-receive-antibiotics/
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miana79 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote miana79 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 1:40am
I skim the article, but I thought to much antibiotics is a bad thing, depending on the infection of course.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (11) Thanks(11)   Quote Lilaca Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 4:24am
less poisons to black children
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (6) Thanks(6)   Quote afrokock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 4:32am
i think the gist of the article is a racial bias towards diagnosing black children

the lack of antibiotic prescriptions is a symptom of a much bigger problem
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Lilaca Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 4:51am
true!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GoodGirlGoneGr8 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 6:44am
Originally posted by Lilaca Lilaca wrote:

less poisons to black children


My initial sentiments...but, I thought about the black kids out there who truly need treatment and aren't properly treated...

This is why it's good for children to have a vocal and knowledgeable parent/guardian. I will never forget the time I broke my leg, my mom was at work so my bff took me to the ER...the pain was so excruciating that i had to be wheeled in...and the rude ass yt doctor tried to send me away from the hospital with no cast, splint, crutches, meds etc. I guess she expected me to shuck and jive my way out of the ER painlessly. I called my mom and she rushed down to the hospital and ordered the doc to give me crutches and some pain killers.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (5) Thanks(5)   Quote TokyoRose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 6:51am
Yeah.  I wasn't surprised by this at all.  I remember going to the ER with a very swollen left leg.  The yt doctor was all, "Looks normal to me."  Didn't even try to touch it or anything. 

I went to the doctor here in Japan, and don't you know he found I had a fractured knee cap from when I was a kid, a bone that was lodged in there from a childhood accident, he found I had NO ligament connecting my knee to my knee cap.  He was ON IT.  Which is why I will NEVER set foot in a US hospital ever again.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lilaca Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 7:29am
sweet lord! ^
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tbaby Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 7:54am
Originally posted by TokyoRose TokyoRose wrote:

Yeah.  I wasn't surprised by this at all.  I remember going to the ER with a very swollen left leg.  The yt doctor was all, "Looks normal to me."  Didn't even try to touch it or anything. 

I went to the doctor here in Japan, and don't you know he found I had a fractured knee cap from when I was a kid, a bone that was lodged in there from a childhood accident, he found I had NO ligament connecting my knee to my knee cap.  He was ON IT.  Which is why I will NEVER set foot in a US hospital ever again.

You probably had a torn ACL, PCL or another ligament in your knee.  Tears in those can make your knee unstable, but you can still walk.  There's only 1 ligament that connects your knee cap (patella) to your lower leg and it has to be intact or else you can't walk at all so he either told you something different or he was wrong.  Google patellar tendon tear.

We do need to be proactive in regards to our health because we do know prejudice is everywhere and physicians aren't all knowing.  Many are plain stupid.  Use the internet and read up on symptoms you are having before showing up to your doctor's office.  And if they suggest some form of therapy or drug, YOU research the side effects and alternative treatments before accepting blindly what he/she tells you.



Originally posted by GoodGirlGoneGr8 GoodGirlGoneGr8 wrote:

Originally posted by Lilaca Lilaca wrote:

less poisons to black children


My initial sentiments...but, I thought about the black kids out there who truly need treatment and aren't properly treated...

This is why it's good for children to have a vocal and knowledgeable parent/guardian. I will never forget the time I broke my leg, my mom was at work so my bff took me to the ER...the pain was so excruciating that i had to be wheeled in...and the rude ass yt doctor tried to send me away from the hospital with no cast, splint, crutches, meds etc. I guess she expected me to shuck and jive my way out of the ER painlessly. I called my mom and she rushed down to the hospital and ordered the doc to give me crutches and some pain killers.

Clap


Edited by Tbaby - Mar 24 2013 at 7:59am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TokyoRose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 24 2013 at 8:11am
I can never remember which one the doctor says I had.  All I remember is that he showed me the x-ray--I think the ligament was torn on the inner part of the left knee--and he had to reconstruct it.  Whatever ligament that was supposed to be there wasn't there.  When I was in the US, I never even got x-rays to find this out.  The idiot doctor told me I needed physical therapy for 6 months before he could do anything.
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