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Does long term use of silicones cause balding?

 
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DEE80 View Drop Down
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    Posted: Mar 19 2014 at 2:01pm
I haven't posted in here in a long time, but I had a question or comment. Smile I was looking at a video on YT where a woman showed her hair after she had went natural. I don't know how long she's been natural, but she had some bald spots. She said it was from using silicones. I have co-washing religiously for almost 3 weeks on a daily basis. I use either Herbal Essence Hello Hydration and Curl Junkie Daily Fix. I got so scared that I started to just using Curl Junkie. I do wash my hair weekly with a sulfate-free 'poo. Should I just stick with a silicone free conditioner or keep using what works?
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Originally posted by DEE80 DEE80 wrote:

I haven't posted in here in a long time, but I had a question or comment. Smile I was looking at a video on YT where a woman showed her hair after she had went natural. I don't know how long she's been natural, but she had some bald spots. She said it was from using silicones. I have co-washing religiously for almost 3 weeks on a daily basis. I use either Herbal Essence Hello Hydration and Curl Junkie Daily Fix. I got so scared that I started to just using Curl Junkie. I do wash my hair weekly with a sulfate-free 'poo. Should I just stick with a silicone free conditioner or keep using what works?


It's definitely possible to get bald spots from silicones. People can be silicone sensitive the same way you can be protein sensitive. This isn't the case with everyone, some people just have fragiler hair than others depending on their hair type (porosity thickness curl pattern)

It's possible the woman was using silicone conditioners and maybe not using sulfate shampoo often enough or at all (which are the only things that can remove silicones) so it allowed the silicone to build up on her hair, and with her sensitivity, her hair reacted badly to it. This isn't the first time I've heard ppl complaining of this, either. Maybe you think its working for you know, but if your hair feels rough and like straw like when its dry and without product, that should be a telltale sign its building up

When you use silicones, they form a plastic barrier on the hair blocking proper moisture absorption especially depending on your hair's porosity. This is why relaxed hair seems to like silicone and proteins, because the cuticles have been permanently damaged and very high porousand weak, they want those fillers.

This is why you pretty much need to use sulfate shampoos if you want the silicone residue to get off your hair. Even if you don't necessarily get bald spots, although if u let it build up overtime it can cause brittleness and dryness that leads to breakage, the build up from the silicones can make it more difficult for you hair to absorb moisture. So your hair may feel soft when wet, but frizzy and dehydrated when dry since most of the moisture that could be absorbed, evaporates before that can happen due to the silicones in the way.

 Unfortunately sulfates are extremely drying on the hair, and strip moisture. Even if you used them, you'd be bouncing back and forth between blocking moisture from your hair shaft, and stripping moisture from it, perpetuating chronically dehydrated hair. so If you are going to stick with the sulfate free shampoo, you have to do it more often to keep up with the amount of silicone build up. 

I personally would avoid silicones all together. Silicone build up stays on the hair even after you wash the conditioner out, so to me it's like perpetuating build up and getting in the way of what could be increasing your moisture retention levels.

You may want to read into this method to see if it appeals to you as well.

http://forum.blackhairmedia.com/the-max-hydration-methodfrom-my-other-post_topic368937_page1.html




Edited by pinkecube - Mar 20 2014 at 3:02am
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No and does she know cause of her hair loss could be a number of things like who told her it was from silicons. I wouldn't base my hair regimen off of a video. Listen to your own hair.
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In my case that would be negatory. I have been using silicones for half of my life and I am not bald.  I will admit that my hair is not as thick as it was but I am in school, working and older.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DEE80 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 12:43pm
Thanks ladies for your comments. Smile She probably didn't wash her hair with shampoo on a regular basis. She probably just co-wash and that's it. I'll take my chance and use sulfate-free conditioner from now on.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote LadyAradia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 26 2014 at 9:01am
No that is all balogna & cowashing only is fine. I see no point in ever stripping the treatment off of the strands since I will only put some more right back on the hair the instant I finish rinsing out the cleanser. LOL  Silicone is one the BEST emollients for hair and skin known to man. Silicones are oily, emollient substances. Here is a definition of an emollient to tell you what silicone does.
emollient (ɪˈmɒlɪənt)
Definition: Emollients are key ingredients in moisturizers and cleansers. They are chemicals that remain in the stratum corneumto act as lubricants. They help maintain the soft, smooth, and pliable appearance of the skin. Emollients are often thought of as "filling in the crevices" between corneocytes that are in the process of desquamation (shedding). The emollient used in a moisturizer plays a key role in its "skin slip," the smooth feeling imparted to the skin after application.
http://dermatology.about.com/od/glossarye/g/emollient.htm

If silicones or oils prevented all moisture absorption, hair that was flat ironed with silicone would never revert when you cleanse it. Hair DOES revert when you cleanse it even if you use silicones or oils for years and never use sulfates to cleanse it.  Now silicones and oils DO help to slow down the reverting and puffiness when you go out in humidity but they do not block out all water or moisture. Hair can get wet and it does revert with silicones or oils on it. As a matter of fact, the converse is true. When you put silicone conditioner over wet hair it works like the L-O-C formula, sealing the moisture INSIDE the hair strands. Hair dryness is more an issue of lack of lipids or natural fatty, moist substances in the strand.  This is addressed in one of the articles below. So water or hydration alone is not going to make your hair feel less dry. In fact as the hair dries from water alone, it will take with it a lot of natural oils also evaporating from the strand leaving the hair DRYER. So in order to fix dryness, you need to add emulsions of water with oils to the strand that can replicate natural lipids...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gkDoMNz8RQ Water alone is not enough. Furthermore, adding drying agents like vinegar and baking soda will eat out even more of the few lipids (fats) the strands have and leave the hair dryer. It may feel softer when it is wet because you have dissolved some of the keratin similar to the way a relaxer dissolves some of the keratin and cuticle. This is why some naturals notice a smoother curl pattern after baking soda.They've swollen the strands as much as a relaxer with the baking soda which causes destruction of some of the disulfide bonds that form kinks and curl patterns. This is the same thing that relaxers do to the hair, swell the strand and cause the disulfide curl bonds to break.. (You've essentially eroded  some of the strand off and zapped out its natural oils. That is why it will feel dryer when it dries after zapping the hair with corrosive vinegar and baking soda. . Silicone is not what you need to be worried about. It is an oily emollient. It is not a corrosive like these other drying things people are trying experiments with these days.

I see this same bull crap with vegans and vegetarians. They spread fear telling people they will drop dead on the spot if they eat a drop of meat. (I am vegetarian/vegan some times myself but the medical statistics do not substantiate what they are saying any more than the scientific data supports what the cult followers are saying about silicone) This is like a cult of fanatics spreading this none sense.  You can not reason with them. Silicone has been a main ingredient in hair products for over 50 years and people are not going  bald.  

If you do not want to use it then don't. It is a great product for those who want to seal in moisture and condition the hair. Silicone is especially great for those with puffy hair who need a little weight to their locks to keep from puffing up. Silicone may be too heavy for some with baby fine Caucasian hair just as oils may be too heavy for the same hair types. African Americans can benefit from silicones just as we benefit from oils. ignore the cult fanatics who spread this bull crap.

Here is what the real scientists say about this. Ignore the pseudo scientists who do not have any degrees and are not even cosmetologists. The only degree the folk have who spread these lies about silicones is  doctorate degrees  in spreading bull crap, lies and fallacies. 

photoPerry Romanowski is a writer, cosmetic chemist, Inventor, scientist, instructor, futurologist, and thought leader. He’s also the founder of Chemists Corner blog and training program.

 

 

161182_562912629_999072224_nRandy Schueller is a writer, former Sr. Director of Hair and Skin Care R&D for Alberto Culver and Unilever and a member of the National Association of Science Writers.

 

Will silicones dry out hair?

by  on MAY 2, 2010

Summer says about silicones… I am an esthetician and an absolute ingredient crazy beauty product junkie. My question for you is whether or not silicone in any of its forms is drying and therefore damaging to the hair. My hair stylist told me that it dries hair out, resulting in the breakage I have always experienced. As a curly haired woman living in humidity, silicones have saved me from much unnecessary frizz. Please clarify what effect silicones have on hair, and also skin if you could, as I was taught that they formed a protective layer over the skin holding in the skin’s natural moisture (as well as imparting a silky feel to the surface).

The Right Brain’s silky smooth reply:

Good for your Summer! You’re not blindly following the advice of your hair stylist!

Savvy about silicone

The truth is, silicone (the molecule pictured above) is one of the MOST effective ingredients for conditioning hair or skin. In both cases it serves as a protective barrier. In fact, in skin lotions dimethicone (a form of silicone) is so good it’s approved as an over the counter drug ingredient.

In hair care products you’ll see a mixture of dimethicone and cyclomethicone typically used. Again, dimethicone is heavier and coats the hair; cyclomethicone is very thin and helps to spread the dimethicone, it also evaporates so it’s good for use in lightweight products like leave in conditioners or volumizing products.

The Beauty Brains bottom line

Silicones are good moisturizers for hair and skin and are commonly used in many, many products. We’ve never seen any data that shows they dry out or damage hair.

http://thebeautybrains.com/2010/05/02/will-silicones-dry-out-hair/


Second post

Will Silicone Build Up on My Hair?

by  on JANUARY 27, 2010

Celeste asks…I have found out from this site that all I hear about silicone is not true. So what else is not true? Do I have to cleanse the silicone from my hair, or will it wear off? Can I use an Aubrey or some such shampoo or cowash?

The Left Brain responds:

Silicone is a much maligned ingredient; I’m really not sure what it’s done to deserve this reputation.

Wear off or wash off?

Whether or not a silicone will “wear off” depends on what type of silicone you’re talking about. Dimethicone needs to be washed off. Cyclomethicone will evaporate off your hair just like water evaporates. Generally, any shampoo will wash away the silicone left on your hair from styling treatments and conditioners.

Is Aubrey acceptable?

Any shampoo will wash away the silicone. Cowash will not be enough and the silicone may start to build up and weigh down your hair.

http://thebeautybrains.com/2010/01/27/will-silicone-build-up-on-my-hair/

(weighing down is more a problem amongst Caucasians than African Americans who may welcome elongation time)

Does silicone suffocate hair?

by  on FEBRUARY 16, 2007

Carly’s Question:

There has been a lot of controversy lately about silicones in hair products. I am a member of a naturally curly hair website and many of the members are anti-silicone because of the claims that silicones bond to the hair and do not allow moisture into the hair shaft. Supposedly once the silicone is on the hair it acts as a barrier between your hair shaft and any moisture. Is all of this true, or is it just a myth? I will sometimes use a silicone product, but then later feel guilty that I am suffocating my hair, and wash it all off. I think it would be great if you can let everyone know the truth behind silicones.

The Right Brain’s Response:

Questions about silicones being bad for your hair come up a lot. But you can just call us the cosmetic mythbusters, Carly, because silicones do not really cause the problem you described. Shampoos and conditioners that contain a high level of high molecular weight, water insoluble silicones can build up on hair, that much is true. And if you over-use products like this everyday, it is possible to end up with hair that feels weighed down and limp. But even this does happen, you’re not really suffocating your hair.

3 Reasons Why Silicone Can’t Suffocate Hair:

1) Even if you didn’t wash all the silicone out, we’ve never seen any data that indicates that a small amount of silicone residue acts as a “barrier” between hair shaft and moisture. On average, your hair contains about 8 to 14% water by weight but it will equilibrate to the ambient humidity. In other words, it will pick up moisture when it’s very humid and it will lose moisture when it’s very dry. Slight silicone residue won’t substantially change that. Now, if you slather on a heavy layer of a silicone hair treatment product, that’s a different story!

2) Even though your hair absorbs moisture from the environment, its state of dryness isn’t completely controlled by this external water. Dryness is more a function of how damaged your hair is and how much natural lipids it contains.

3) Even if you did block your hair from absorbing moisture, the silicone would act like a moisturizing agent because it would plasticize and lubricate your hair. It would essentially fight the effects of dryness.

The Beauty Brains Bottom Line:

If you use a silicone containing product and you like the way it makes your hair look and feel, DONT WORRY ABOUT IT! Don’t feel guilty because some people tell you that it’s bad for your hair. Oil products like Ojon can work too if you don’t want to use silicone.

http://thebeautybrains.com/2007/02/16/does-silicone-suffocate-hair/

Are silicones bad for your hair?

by  on JANUARY 29, 2007

Diane’s Undaunted By Silicones For Silkier Hair:

The question of silicone’s usefulness has long being a subject of intense debate, speculation and confusion in Long Hair Community. As a consequence, a lot of members in Long Hair Community are wary of using silicone-heavy products, such as Pantene conditioner. Dimethicone, Cyclomethicone and whatnot are allegedly harder to rinse out, therefore build-up occurs faster than a silicone-free hair regimen.

As for me, I love how cones smooth and soften my hair big time – while in shower. Sadly, the miraculous silkiness vanishes as soon as my hair dries. So I use unrefined coconut oil to successfully add shine, softness and protection for my hair.

My questions are these: Are cones really harder to rinse out? How do they work on hair? Do they dry hair out? And why does that wonderful silkiness disappear when my hair dries? How do carrier oils like coconut oil, sweet almond oil compare to silicones?

The Right Brain Comments on ‘Cones for Conditioning:

Diane, you raise some very good questions. In general, silicones work by covering hair with a thin hydrophobic (water-proof) coating. This coating serves several purposes: it helps reduce the porosity of the hair which makes it less likely to absorb humidity; it helps reduce moisture loss from the inside of the hair; and it lubricates the surface of the hair so it feel smoother and combs easier.

The properties vary depending on which particular silicone is in the formula. Some silicones do leave a heavy coating on the hair that can be hard to wash off. Others are very water soluble and don’t buildup at all. Dimethicone, (sometimes called simethicone) for example, is the heaviest of all silicones used for hair care. It provides the most smoothing effect but it is also the hardest to wash out. Cyclomethicone on the other hand, gives great slippery feeling while you’re rinsing your hair, but it quickly evaporates leaving nothing behind. This is probably what you`re experiencing.

What about carrier oils, as you describe them? Some oils are effective conditioners. Take coconut oil, for example. While it doesn`t provide the same surface smoothing as silicones, it has been shown to penetrate hair and plasticize the cortex, making hair stronger. (This isn’t true of all natural oils however.) So oils are useful ingredients but they’re not direct replacements for silicones.

The Brains Bottom Line:

It`s tough to tell simply from reading the label because there are so many types of silicones and they can be used in combination with each other. You can’t simply say: all silicones are bad. Some women will find silicones too heavy for their hair, others will love the soft, conditioned feel they provide. You’ll have to experiment to find what’s right for you. Good luck!

http://thebeautybrains.com/2007/01/29/are-silicones-bad-for-your-hair/

What do silicones do for your hair?

by  on JANUARY 23, 2007

One of our favorite resources, The Long Hair Community, has posted an excellent list of silicones used in hair care products. There are a couple of technical inaccuracies here and there, but overall this is a very comprehensive list of what you’ll see on the ingredient lists of the products you buy. It’s a bit long, but we thought we’d reprint it here in it’s entirety for your reference. And it took a lot of time to compile this, so a BIG THANKS to the ladies at the Long Hair Community – it’s one of the best non toxic beauty blogs we’ve ever seen!

Silicone Ingredients Used In Hair Care Products

Amodimethicone- Trimethylsilylamodimethicone- A non-curable amine silicone fluid for hair care products and decorative cosmetics. Provides water resistance.

Amodimethicone (&) C11-15 Pareth-7 (&) Laureth-9 (&) Glycerin (&) Trideceth-12-

An amine functional micro-emulsion for clear, aqueous-based hair products.

Amodimethicone (&) Trideceth-12 (&) Cetrimonium Chloride- Cationic emulsion for hair conditioning.

Bisamino PEG/PPG-41/3 Aminoethyl PG-Propyl Dimethicone- Provides excellent hair conditioning without build-up. Ideal for use in products designed to treat colour, perm, sun and heat-damaged hair.

Bis-Phenylpropyl Dimethicone- A colourless silicone fluid with high RI, low viscosity and volatility, shine enhancement and luxurious feel.

C30-45 Alkyl Dimethicone- Superior compatibility with both silicones and organics. Can be used as a thickening agent which gives a unique silky skin feel.

Cetearyl Methicone- A soft, waxy material; excellent lubricity and spreadability.

Cetyl Dimethicone- Occlusive film forming for skin conditioners.

Cetyl PEG/PPG-15/15 Butyl Ether Dimethicone- A silicone emulsifier for use in the preparation of water-in-oil emulsions. Also offers good emulsification of paraffin oils and vegetable triglycerides.

Cyclomethicone (&) PEG/PPG-20/15 Dimethicone- For formulating water-in-oil emulsions, particularly water-in-silicone emulsions. Excellent aesthetics.

Cyclopentasiloxane- Cyclomethicone D5- Provides improved efficacy in antiperspirants and wet combing in hair conditioners.

Cyclopentasiloxane (&) C30-45 Alkyl Cetearyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer- Provides a unique feeling during rub-in followed by a soft powdery feel for an extended period. Ideal for cream to powder formulations.

Cyclopentasiloxane (&) Cyclohexasiloxane- Available in three different proportions offering low viscosity, a relatively high volatility and a cyclic structure.

Cyclopentasiloxane (&) Dimethicone- The basis for hair serums. Conditioning without build up.

Cyclopentasiloxane (&) Dimethicone/Vinyldimethicone Crosspolymer- An elastomer dispersion resulting in a smooth, highly viscous gel with a unique silky feel on application.

Cyclopentasiloxane (&) Dimethiconol- Provides a smooth, velvety feel without greasiness. Useful for skincare and hair conditioning.

Cyclopentasiloxane (&) Trimethylsiloxysilicate- Silicone resin blended with Cyclopentasiloxane. Provides water resistance.

Cyclotetrasiloxane- Cyclomethicone D4- A volatile silicone for improving skin feel in applications such as anti-perspirants.

DEA PG-Propyl PEG/PPG-18/21 Dimethicone- Enhances the performance of shampoos and conditioners with improved gloss, manageability and moisturizing properties.

Diisostearoyl Trimethylolpropane Siloxy Silicate- Highly substantive to skin, has good lubricity and spreadability. Compatible with organic oils and waxes.

Dimethicone Copolyol

Dimethicone (&) Laureth-4 (&) Laureth-23- Non-ionic silicone emulsion for 2-in-1 shampoos.

Dimethicone (&) Trimethylsiloxysilicate- Water resistant, non-tacky film, ideal for sun screens.

Dimethicone (from 1 to 1,000,000 cs)- The original silicone ‘oil’. A complete range is available from the highly mobile 1-20 cs, the popular 50-500 cs and the heavier 1,000-1,000,000 cs.

Dimethiconol (&) Sodium Dodecylbenzenesulphonate- An anionic emulsion for leave-in hair products. Disperses well in aqueous preparations and gives the hair good texture.

Diphenyl Dimethicone- A heat-resistant silicone with good film-forming properties. Used as a skin conditioning and anti foaming agent.

Disiloxane- Volatile replacement for ethanol in APs and aerosols.

Lauryl Methicone Copolyol

PCA Dimethicone- Functional over a broad pH range and offers excellent smoothing, conditioning and emolliency properties in many different applications.

PEG/PPG-20/15 Dimethicone- Previously referred to as Dimethicone Copolyol. A very versatile, water soluble polyether modified silicone for use in skin and hair products.

PEG-12 Dimethicone- Previously referred to as Dimethicone Copolyol. A very versatile, water soluble polyether modified silicone for use in skin and hair products.

Phenyl Trimethicone- A very popular high gloss silicone for spray-on hair products. Also provides emolliency and water repellency in skin care products.

Polysilicone-18 Cetyl Phosphate- Color-retaining conditioner for hair products. Also offers thermal protection and a slick, soft after-feel. Excellent solubility and compatibility with most surfactants.

Silicone Resin Spheres (2, 5 & 6 micron)- Fine, white spherical particles give slip and lubricity in pressed and loose powders.

Simethicone- A mixture of Dimethicone and hydrated silica, used as an antifoaming agent. Available in two grades.

Stearoxy Dimethicone

Stearyl Dimethicone

Trimethylsiloxysilicate- A solid silicone resin for decorative cosmetics. Provides water resistance.

Trisiloxane- Anti foaming and skin conditioning agent.

http://thebeautybrains.com/2007/01/23/what-do-silicones-do-for-your-hair/


Bottom line, silicones are excellent emollients, they just may be too heavy for some people's hair. Others will love them. It is whatever works for you. 

Who are the Beauty Brains?

The Beauty Brains were founded by Perry Romanowski and Randy Schueller, two cosmetic scientists with over 50 combined years of experience in formulating and testing beauty products.

photoPerry Romanowski is a writer, cosmetic chemist, Inventor, scientist, instructor, futurologist, and thought leader. He’s also the founder of Chemists Corner blog and training program.

 

 

161182_562912629_999072224_nRandy Schueller is a writer, former Sr. Director of Hair and Skin Care R&D for Alberto Culver and Unilever and a member of the National Association of Science Writers.

 



Edited by LadyAradia - Mar 26 2014 at 2:26pm
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THANK YOU FOR THAT!!!

I wish that could be posted on every natural hair board in the world so this whole "silicones is the debil" mess can go away for good! 


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If your hair is naturally low in porosity, what could be beneficial effect of silicones can do more harm than good.

http://mycurlymane.com/author/admin/

"Low Porosity

If your hair has low porosity, it will have trouble opening up due to its overly compact cuticle layer. With this firm barrier, your hair will have difficulty absorbing moisture/water and allowing it to escape. As a result, hair will take longer to absorb products, leaving it dry. It will also be susceptible to product build up.

Needs: A lot of moisture. To open up the cuticle, try steamers, hot oil treatments, and products that are a little more alkaline/have a higher pH level. Add moisture to your hair while it’s damp, before the cuticle layer closes up again.

Need to avoid: Products and techniques that further seal the cuticle, including protein treatments, silicones, and mineral oil."


Your hello hydration conditioner has cones in it that are not water soluable, and are prone to build up on the hair.

Ingredients to Hello Hydration Conditioner:
Water , Stearyl Alcohol , Behentrimonium Chloride , Cetyl Alcohol , Bis Aminopropyl Dimethicone , Zea Mays (Corn) Silk Extract , Orchis Mascula Flower Extract , Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Fruit Extract , Fragrance , Benzyl Alcohol , Disodium EDTA , Sodium Hydroxide , Methylchloroisothiazolinone , Methylisothiazolinone , Blue 1


http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/curl-products/curlchemist-amodimethicone-and-other-amine-functionalized-silicones

"These modified silicones (The silicone I bolded is modified) seem to be of particular benefit for those of us with damaged hair, permanently colored hair or those concerned about the buildup of conditioning agents. It would be necessary to use a shampoo containing one of the lauryl or laureth sulfates or cocamidopropyl betaine to completely remove this silicone from the hair, which may be of concern to those who prefer to use only conditioner-cleansing methods."


Lady Aradia's own quote from credible source, that is exactly in line with what I am saying:

"Diane, you raise some very good questions. In general, silicones work by covering hair with a thin hydrophobic (water-proof) coating. This coating serves several purposes: it helps reduce the porosity of the hair which makes it less likely to absorb humidity; it helps reduce moisture loss from the inside of the hair; and it lubricates the surface of the hair so it feel smoother and combs easier."

If your hair is low or even normal porosity, you definetly are more prone to it building up, especially if your hair is low poros. It is a permeable barrier, but it still does block a significant amount moisture, which can have a substantial effect on low poros hair. The level of sensitivity to this build up depends on your own hair. SLS containing shampoo is the ideal for good removal. However, other milder sulphate free surfactants can slow silicone build up.

Higher porosity hair will benefit from their cuticles being blocked since they lose moisture more easily. The type of cleanser that can remove these type of cones are SLS. Most conditioners contain the non water soluable cones anyway, so its important to look at the ingredients and research them.

 Although being water soluable sometimes doesnt make a difference if you have a specific sensitivity, since it is then absorbed into the hair forming bonds similar to a protein. Not everyones hair responds well to that, and if you have low porosity, your hair is more prone to either immediately drying out from it, or drying out from frequent and continued use over time.

Proteins are water soluable and work similarly to water soluable silicones, some people's hair still react adversely to proteins, by becoming drier and prone to breakage. If fact, many water soluable proteins are amino based, so if you are protein sensitive, your hair may not respond well to those either. Some oils like coconut oil have the same effect, even though it absorbs into the hair.

There are people who don't have this problem but there are many who do so its relevant to mention it. In the end it all comes down to your hair's porosity, type, and your other individual hair quirks to tell you whether or not you will benefit from it. The main thing is to not allow silicones to build up on your hair, if you fit that category. Unless you have higher porosity, damaged or chemically treated hair (including dye) the build up can really cause more problems than they are worth, and the type of conditioner you are using does really contain silicones that cant be easily removed with out the use of sulfates.

There are plenty of conditioners that provide slip and do not contain silicones. Silicones are not the sole sorce of slip in conditioners, hence why many silicone free conditioners provide great slip. Kinky curly knot today is one example. Silicones are really more beneficial for people with higher porosity, straight, chemically treated, or damaged hair. But for low poros hair and even in some cases normal poros hair, it isnt necessary and can eventually lead to dry brittle hair. This is the reality and experience for many people and its important to acknowledge both sides of the spectrum and figure out what your hair can take, and how your hair feels after longterm use.  If the cuticle isnt damaged and has the ability to close on its own its enough to use a low ph product, or doing an acv rinse. That will have the smoothing, defrizzing, softening effect without build up.


Edited by pinkecube - Mar 27 2014 at 1:03pm
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LadyAradia View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote LadyAradia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 27 2014 at 12:31am
You say this as a scientist, a cosmetologist or as one of those other type of "experts" I mentioned above?  I love how people with NO QUALIFICATIONS whatsoever speak with such authority.

I am a cosmetologist. We used silicone containing conditioners on all clients for decades at many salons and no one's hair was damaged. Quite the contrary. As I said, you can not reason with fearmongerers. They fabricate tales of doom and gloom based on non proven hypothesis and spread them with great authority based on  NO STUDIES, NO STATISTICS, NO QUALIFICATIONS WHATSOEVER,just based on SPECULATION.

You are disputing me, a cosmetologist with decades of experience in the field and you are disputing the scientists quoted above who have tested hair products for 50 years between them .LOL
Anyways, the only ones really qualified to speak on this have stated:
"The Beauty Brains bottom line

Silicones are good moisturizers for hair and skin and are commonly used in many, many products. We’ve never seen any data that shows they dry out or damage hair.

http://thebeautybrains.com/2010/05/02/will-silicones-dry-out-hair/"


They are actually scientists with degrees.  You are a spreading pseudo "science" based on nothing except your own inflated ego.



Edited by LadyAradia - Mar 27 2014 at 12:41am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 27 2014 at 1:55am
Thanks for all the info, Lady Aradia
And to the OP, just pay attention to how your hair reacts to silicones. If there is no buildup, if your hair is not suffering in any way, continue to use it.

I haven't use silicones in my hair in a long time, but I am considering giving a try to see if it is better to remain cone-free or not.
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