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does hiphop effect children more negatively then

 
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afrokock View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote afrokock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 11:45am
also we keep talking about conscious rap

lets bear in mind that conscious rap as a movement was dead by 1991 pretty much

we havent had a conscious movement in rap on larger platform since the beginning of 1992 and then only a few groups managed to peek through like arrested development

the conscious rap movement's been dead longer than it was alive.



the rawkus and koch era couldnt even make that much of a significant impact

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Josephuss View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Josephuss Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 11:49am
content wise, hiphop has no redeeming qualities these days. hiphop wasnt worse in the 90s. they atleast tried to surround the negativity with substance. now the majority is pure garbage.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote NuAttitude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 11:50am
Originally posted by afrokock afrokock wrote:

Charlamagne is a certified c*nt.

I agree with a ton of sh*t he says .. But lately he's been talking out of his ass ..

He's been pandering of late.

The Only argument he can throw is that hiphop is more accessible but the advent of the internet blows the presumed effects of hiphop on the psych out of proportion.

Hiphop like jazz is a scapegoat for people who don't want to address the root cause
No argument there.Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote afrokock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 12:14pm
so your girl fluent in trapanese?

theres a text id like translation on mate

lol
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Random Thoughts Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 12:15pm
Originally posted by afrokock afrokock wrote:

Originally posted by Random Thoughts Random Thoughts wrote:

I think hip hop does play a role in setting expectations for children.
It helps illustrate social templates that kids want to follow.
Environment and racism and poverty, yes all of that too, but it's worth
mentioning that hip hop is very influential to growing people . Maybe
more than any other music genre (aside from country) it teaches as well
as entertains.  It teaches people how to talk, how to dress, how to
think.




does it really?

or is it a reflection of the constant youthfulness of the culture?

its still very much influenced by inner city trends rather than the other way around


Those trends would remain niche without hip hop to get it out to the masses.

My girl is a teacher, working with kids all day. Hip Hop absolutely teaches them how to talk, how to dress, how to think, and in a lot of cases what to think about topics/situations.




Edited by Random Thoughts - Sep 04 2014 at 12:16pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote bunzaveli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 12:35pm
when i was in the 4th grade, there was a dance called the doodoo brown, its pretty much what they called twerking in 93 or whatever year that was. little girls were doing this dance during recess. they would never dare do that sh*t in front of our parents cause they would tear our asses up. this was like 20 years ago



fast forward to last year, me and my brothers were looking at our window and these hoodrat mommas were encouraging there daughters, had to be like 7 or 8 years old to "twerk", we was like damn everyone in that parking lost at life already.

what happen between then and now ? i grew up around Brothas, and these Brothas is different.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote OoDles O Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 12:43pm
Yeah. I agree with others. I think its just a matter of over saturation.
Even R&B music is all about boning in the club and pulling your panties to the side.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Diane (35) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 12:51pm
I never understood how doodoo brown was allowed to be cool, come nuh man doo do brown?

here on the islands my answer (in relation to dancehall) would be yes yes and definitely yes but not only the kids but the young adults too plenty of anecdotal evidence as proof, it is scary how young the mtv generation is/kids stop watching cartoons /shows. but as regards the OP im sitting back in the cut reading and thanking, thanking and reading.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote india100 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 12:55pm
Yes . Children and adults try to emulate the image and lifestyle. Growing up in the southern suburbs of EAST ST LOUIS , The message of hip-hop music was liberation and confidence. Hip-hop shaped politics and gave a positive image of our people , but that was 1979/1980.

My love affair with hip-hop ended after years of disappointment with messages of violence, misogyny, materialism and hostile sexual stereotyping. I will never purchase the current rap for my little daughter .

We listen to old school rap on occasion , but my baby likes MJ and One Direction . I enjoy old school rap like Snoop in private mommy time. We need better images and lyrics for our teens .
Children should never be exposed to hard core rap in my op . Many young kids can sing the lyrics to rap artist , but fail Kindergarten . I think many young parents expose children to adult content and think it's cute and ok . My parents would never allow kids to sit in the same room during Adult entertainment times . We as Parents are responsible for our children , not the rappers if we allow our kids to listen to that mess . JMO



Edited by india100 - Sep 04 2014 at 12:58pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote OhMyCurlz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 04 2014 at 1:34pm
The difference is that back then there was balance and some substance. You may have a song repping thug life and then another about something positive. There was diversity. There was the Fugees, and then there was Bone Thugs N Harmony. On top of that, there were social films/movies that hilighted good rap and other issues. Rappers back in the day, made sure in their songs that people never forgot where they "came from". 

Even rappers like Kanye, who DID put out quality music in the beginning sharply declined around the later 2000s. 

Rappers now have VERY little substance and have evolved into coons. All they talk about is eating pu$$y, getting pu$$y, money, or what they have. They completely disrespect the old heads that paved the way for them. I heard Missy and Timbaland talking about this at one point. They NEVER disrespected the artists that paved the way for them, nowadays if you haven't made a hit in 5 years all prior accomplishments and music means nothing. These new rappers have never lived the lifestyles that they speak and most are unoriginal. They copy each other's style of rap so much to the extent where they all sound the same. They are actors, literal performers and have no type of connection or understanding of the communities that support their songs. 


Edited by OhMyCurlz - Sep 04 2014 at 1:37pm
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