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"Do Africans Learn About American Slavery?"

 
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femmemichelle View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote femmemichelle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 2:06pm
And who is they? Please point to specific members in each of my African friends' families who sold blacks off to the Americas. I will wait.


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femmemichelle View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (8) Thanks(8)   Quote femmemichelle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 2:09pm
Originally posted by liesnalibis liesnalibis wrote:

I know one thing, it was disrespectful to come over here and after making a living off America thanks to slaves and their ancestors blazing the path to diss the hell out of us during black history month. He asked her a yes or no question. If she wanted to go deeper she could have come up with something more intelligent and respectful than "The world doesn't revolve around America you know." Um, bytch I see you still found your way here and you ain't goin back! Let an American go to Africa and disrespect their people and the civilization and see if we get a pass.

Like I always say, if Africa was so damn hot they wouldn't be here. Gtf!

Your fallacy lies in the fact that Africans don't assume the world needs to bow down to their feet as if they're the only continent worthy of praise. Americans often do, and this is where the butt hurt is coming from. 

How many of YOU know anything about African history? Why would you assume people in Africa would know anymore about you than you know about them? 
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carolina cutie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote carolina cutie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 2:09pm
*Messy O post*

I was waiting on the African BHM members to come read this thread.Beer
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keepgrowing View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (4) Thanks(4)   Quote keepgrowing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 2:51pm
Every time we got to slavery in my history classes, white teachers emphasized the role of Africans in slave trade as well as Africans with their dark skin and stature were better able to endure longer hours in the sun than whites so it makes "sense" that whites would "use" Africans to work the field during those times. Bull sh*t.

They say this to take the blame off of whites and rationalize slavery as necessary. They skipped the monstrous acts whites did towards blacks in and out of Africa. They also neglected to mention the African nations fighting to gain freedom from colonialism and apartheid is skimmed over.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote afrokock Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 4:11pm
Originally posted by carolina cutie carolina cutie wrote:

*Messy O post*

I was waiting on the African BHM members to come read this thread.Beer

messy

messy

messy

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creole booty View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (6) Thanks(6)   Quote creole booty Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 4:29pm
Originally posted by femmemichelle femmemichelle wrote:

And who is they? Please point to specific members in each of my African friends' families who sold blacks off to the Americas. I will wait.




Disclaimer: What ur saying makes sense. I'm quoting u for a different reason than to disagree with u.

Post: what femme said, I swear on life, is what white people in America in 2013 have said to me.

(My personal opinion on the exact comment made, in context, is that it wasn't nearly enough blacks selling people into slavery for that to b brought up by African Americans or anyone for that matter.. What? Like 0.05% of slaves in slavery were there because of blacks, right? I don't understand y people even mention that.)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (7) Thanks(7)   Quote ms_wonderland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 4:48pm
creole, i was going to say the same thing...that's exactly what white people say.  not a shot at femme but it's really no diff than the broad stroke painted twd the other race.

but what i was coming in to say is....yes, the world DOES revolve around black america. Cool
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alynxx View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote alynxx Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 5:36pm
Jokers asking her that. Yes the world do NOT revolve around America. Next please.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oladunni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 5:40pm
Originally posted by creole booty creole booty wrote:

Originally posted by femmemichelle femmemichelle wrote:

And who is they? Please point to specific members in each of my African friends' families who sold blacks off to the Americas. I will wait.




Disclaimer: What ur saying makes sense. I'm quoting u for a different reason than to disagree with u.

Post: what femme said, I swear on life, is what white people in America in 2013 have said to me.

(My personal opinion on the exact comment made, in context, is that it wasn't nearly enough blacks selling people into slavery for that to b brought up by African Americans or anyone for that matter.. What? Like 0.05% of slaves in slavery were there because of blacks, right? I don't understand y people even mention that.)

mmmhmmm
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purple.chuckz View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote purple.chuckz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 17 2014 at 6:48pm
This. I know the Kongo empire sold some of their own slaves and rival tries into slavery, but the Portuguese flipped the script and sold them into slavery too.

A good chunk of the Congolese ended up in Brazil .

Afonso I
c. 1456 to 1545
Catholic
Congo/Dem. Rep. of Congo/Angola


Manikongo Afonso I, the greatest king of the Kongo, reigned from 1506 to 1545. He worked with the Portuguese to bring Christianity to the Kingdom - which was located in the area of present day Angola, Congo, and Zaire - and was the first African king to be recognized in Europe. In the end, however, he was unable to contain the Portuguese, who wished to develop the slave trade.

Afonso was born Mvemba Nzinga and son of the manikongo - the king - of the Kongo, who in 1482 made the first contact with the Portuguese. Mvemba converted to Catholicism, taking the name Afonso. When his father, Nzingu Kuwu (João I), reverted to the traditional Kongo religion, Afonso welcomed the expelled missionaries to the province he governed. The Kongo political system provided for the open election of a successor from among the descendants of the first king. Upon his father's death, Afonso's non-Christian brother attempted to deny him the election, but Afonso defeated him in battle and took the throne. He attributed his victory to divine intervention, inspired by a vision of Santiago Matamoros (St. James the Apostle), who was also the symbol of Christian victory over the Muslims during the crusades in Spain and Portugal.

Afonso entered into relations with King Manuel of Portugal to the profit of both countries. Manuel supplied missionaries and craftsmen to the Kongo; Afonso granted trade privileges to the Portuguese. In his domestic policy Afonso pursued a progressive course, building schools and roads and encouraging development.

The Portuguese became an increasing problem within the kingdom. Many of the architects, doctors and pharmacists turned to commerce rather than practicing their professions. They ignored the laws of the Kongo, and in 1510 Afonso had to ask Portugal for a special representative with authority over his countrymen. Manuel responded with an ambitious plan for Westernizing Kongo society in exchange for ivory, copper, and slaves. Afonso rejected most of the plan, but the expanding slave trade presented serious challenges to the Kongo's stability. Afonso did not repudiate slavery on principle, but in 1526 he issued decrees to regulate and moderate it.

Initially, slavery was limited to war captives, who were numerous enough because of various local battles and continual border disputes. A commission was set up to see that no one was kidnapped into slavery, but soon almost every Portuguese, including the missionaries, was raiding far into the interior, and the Portuguese craftsmen expected to be paid in slaves. By the 1530s the slave traders had contacts on São Tomé Island, an off-shore colony with a royal trade monopoly from Manuel. Because São Tomé stood to lose by strong bonds between Kongo and Portugal, it made every attempt to sabotage those relations.

The Portuguese were wrongly convinced that the Kongo had vast mineral riches that the king was keeping from them. In 1540 they attempted to assassinate Afonso on Easter Sunday as he attended mass, and he barely escaped.

Afonso promoted Christianity diligently, destroying traditional religious symbols and building churches and schools, but the few missionaries he was sent proved to be lazy, corrupt, and venal; they took concubines and lived as nobility. The other Portuguese were also poor examples of the new faith, engaging in drunken orgies and theft. In 1529 and again in 1539 Afonso appealed to the pope for intervention against Portuguese abuses, but to no avail. He sent talented young men to Portugal to be educated. Among them was his son Dom Henrique, who was consecrated a bishop in 1518. This attempt at developing an indigenous clergy failed, even though Dom Henrique returned to the kingdom. In spite of difficulties and the scandalous behavior of the Portuguese, the kingdom nevertheless slowly became partly Christianized.

When Afonso died, there was a dynastic struggle, and his immediate successor, Pedro I, was overthrown and replaced by a grandson, DIOGO I. The Kongo remained at least nominally Christian for over a century, but the hopeful signs of African-European partnership in international relations were shattered by the Portuguese, who began a ruthless expansion of the slave trade.


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