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Did y'all check out today's google doodle?

 
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liesnalibis View Drop Down
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    Posted: Nov 04 2013 at 1:53pm
This is awesome. God is great.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakuntala_Devi

Shakuntala Devi

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Shakuntala Devi
Shakuntala devi.jpg
Shakuntala Devi, May 19, 2006
Born November 4, 1929
Bangalore, India
Died April 21, 2013 (aged 83)
Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Cause of death Respiratory and cardiac problems
Nationality Indian
Other names Human computer

Shakuntala Devi (November 4, 1929 – April 21, 2013), popularly known as the "Human Computer", was a child prodigy and mental calculator.[1][2][3][4][5] Her talents earned her a place in the 1982 edition of The Guinness Book of World Records.[1][2][3] Devi wrote a number of books, including novels and non-fiction texts about mathematics and homosexuality.

Biography

Shakuntala Devi was born in Bangalore, India,[2][3] to an orthodox Kannada Brahmin family.[1][6][7] Her father rebelled against becoming a temple priest[3] and instead joined a circus where he worked as a trapeze artist, lion tamer, tightrope walker and magician.[1][2][5][8] He discovered her ability to memorize numbers while teaching her a card trick when she was about three years old.[1][2][5] Her father left the circus and took her on road shows that displayed her ability at calculation.[2] She was able to do this without any formal education.[1][3] By age six she demonstrated her calculation and memorization abilities at the University of Mysore.[2][3]

In 1944 Devi moved to London with her father.[9] She returned to India in the mid-1960s and married Paritosh Banerji, an officer of the Indian Administrative Service from Kolkata.[9] They were divorced in 1979.[9] Devi returned to Bangalore in the early 1980s.[9]

Devi travelled the world demonstrating her arithmetic talents, including a tour of Europe in 1950 and a performance in New York City in 1976.[2] In 1988 she travelled to the US to have her abilities studied by Arthur Jensen, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. Jensen tested her performance of several tasks, including the calculation of large numbers. Examples of the problems presented to Devi were calculating the cube root of 61,629,875, and the seventh root of 170,859,375.[3][4] Jensen reported that Devi was able to provide the solution to the aforementioned problems (the answers being 395 and 15, respectively) before Jensen was able to copy them down in his notebook.[3][4] Jensen published his findings in the academic journal Intelligence in 1990.[3][4]

In addition to her work as a mental calculator, Devi was an astrologer and an author of several books, including cookbooks and novels.[2][5][8]

In April 2013, Devi was admitted to a hospital in Bangalore with respiratory problems.[1] Over the following two weeks she suffered from complications of the heart and kidneys.[1][2] She died in the hospital on April 21, 2013.[1][2] She was 83 years old.[2][3] She is survived by her daughter, Anupama Banerji.[3][8]

On November 4, 2013, Devi was honored with a Google Doodle for her 84th birthday. [10]

Achievements

  • In 1977 in the USA she competed with a computer to see who could calculate the cube root of 188,132,517 faster (she won). That same year, at the Southern Methodist University she was asked to give the 23rd root of a 201-digit number; she answered in 50 seconds.[1][4] Her answer—546,372,891—was confirmed by calculations done at the U.S. Bureau of Standards by the Univac 1101 computer, for which a special program had to be written to perform such a large calculation.[11]
  • On June 18, 1980, she demonstrated the multiplication of two 13-digit numbers — 7,686,369,774,870 × 2,465,099,745,779 — picked at random by the Computer Department of Imperial College, London. She correctly answered 18,947,668,177,995,426,462,773,730 in 28 seconds.[2][3] This event is mentioned in the 1982 Guinness Book of Records.[2][3]




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sugabanana View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sugabanana Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 04 2013 at 2:21pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hauteshellbi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 04 2013 at 2:55pm
yea thats so cool
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote rickysrose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 04 2013 at 3:01pm
wow with no formal education (not that formal education could teach that)

I wonder if she created or expanded on any mathematical theories
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote rickysrose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 04 2013 at 3:06pm
I find prodigies awe inspiring, just fascinating

wonder if her talent was maximized

if we could have learned more about calculation methods by studying her approach


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote maysay1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 04 2013 at 6:00pm
And if I named my daughter Shakuntala folks would talk about me so bad with no idea of the honor that it is.

Anyway, this is amazing. Love to see women of color recognized for their talents.
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