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Changes to the SAT

 
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Sang Froid View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sang Froid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 27 2014 at 3:34pm
We had to take the ACT to graduate.

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missunfoolish View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote missunfoolish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 27 2014 at 5:21pm
Originally posted by trudawg trudawg wrote:

Originally posted by missunfoolish missunfoolish wrote:

do i need to take the SAT if i went to cc first but plan to transfer somewhere else? 


Nope! But you'll need all your core credits out the way though

well thats nice!
so they accept you based on gpa, grades, etc instead?


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aNgElIc*SoUl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aNgElIc*SoUl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 27 2014 at 5:43pm
Originally posted by Sang Froid Sang Froid wrote:

We had to take the ACT to graduate.



This. The SAT was optional(of course the majority at my hs didn't want to mess with it smh). I was in gt and we were forced to take it.....but I was suspended that day sooooo yea I never took it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote trudawg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 27 2014 at 5:47pm
Originally posted by missunfoolish missunfoolish wrote:

Originally posted by trudawg trudawg wrote:

Originally posted by missunfoolish missunfoolish wrote:

do i need to take the SAT if i went to cc first but plan to transfer somewhere else? 


Nope! But you'll need all your core credits out the way though

well thats nice!
so they accept you based on gpa, grades, etc instead?




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LilMissSunshine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 27 2014 at 8:34pm
Originally posted by Ming Ming wrote:

they changed it after I graduated... I have to explain to younger kids that my score wasn't that bad lol... they measure it out of 2400

im all no wrong answer penalties
Ming, I'm the opposite of those kids. I think they have really high scores then I have to remember that it is out of 2400, and then I'm not all that impressed.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote tatee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 16 2014 at 10:39am

This Is How the New SAT Will Test Vocabulary

A redesigned SAT due out in the spring of 2016 will no longer reward students for the rote memorization of semi-obscure word definitions, but instead emphasize “high utility” words they're more likely to encounter in life

Graduating seniors can throw their flash cards on the celebratory bonfire next year. When students sit down to try their pencils at the redesigned SAT in spring 2016, the questions about vocabulary are going to be different — remodeled and revised, and for champions of obscure words, perhaps transmogrified.

Students will no longer be rewarded for the rote memorization of semi-obscure definitions. Instead, the words that the SAT will highlight in vocabulary questions will be “high utility” words that students are likely to encounter in life and reading beyond those four hours in the testing location. Even the most studied students won’t be able to breeze through vocab sections, matching a word with definition B by reflex; they’ll have to read and gather from the passage exactly what a word means.

Here is an example of a old-style SAT question that students will not be seeing on the new exam:

There is no doubt that Larry is a genuine ——- : he excels at telling stories that fascinate his listeners.

(A) braggart

(B) dilettante

(C) pilferer

(D) prevaricator

(E) raconteur

You may have identified that (E) would be the right answer, raconteur coming from the old French word for relate. But answering such a question won’t be expected of aspirational high school students in the future.

One reason is that the one-sentence question provides little context, so it tests knowledge of knowing a word’s definition, not necessarily how to gather meaning from reading something. As Jim Patterson, executive director of assessment, says, “Students might well only know the word’s meaning from studying it in isolation, perhaps from an unofficial SAT preparation word list.” And memorization skills, the kind that would also put students in the position to know the definitions of the wrong answers in the above question, are not the skills the College Board wants to be testing.

In materials released today, the College Board says they’ll be concentrating on what are known as “Tier Two” words. That terminology comes from academics at the University of Pittsburgh, like Professor Margaret G. McKeown, who devised a system for classifying words into one of three tiers. Tier One words are those that kids will encounter naturally as they’re beginning to talk, like mother, ball, cup, food, run, walk, sit or bed. Tier Three words usually teach a new concept, are relevant only in a particular discipline and have one meaning, like isotope or asphalt or even piano. The Tier Two words go across domains and might have many meanings in different contexts. They appear more in text than in conversation, and they repackage concepts a child could understand on a basic level with more nuance.

In sample questions released today, the College Board gives this example:

[. . .] The coming decades will likely see more intense clustering of jobs, innovation, and productivity in a smaller number of bigger cities and city-regions. Some regions could end up bloated beyond the capacity of their infrastructure, while others struggle, their promise stymied by inadequate human or other resources.

As used in line 55, “intense” most nearly means

A) emotional.

B) concentrated.

C) brilliant.

D) determined.

The key point, as far as the College Board is concerned, is that intense is not only a word that students will regularly encounter but one that could mean A, B, C or D, depending on the context. A raconteur, by contrast, is a raconteur. The redesigned test will focus on deeply understanding more common words rather than being familiar with linguistic gems. Other Tier Two words, McKeown says, might be alleviate, consistent, coincide, congenial, indelible, discord, occur, mention, emerge, admit, perform, fortunate, require or maintain.

Though not consulted, she applauds the SAT shift. The method of teaching that she has championed for more than 30 years is that students need to go through three stages to learn a word: be taught a definition, be shown how the word is used and then use it themselves. McKeown believes Tier Two words are the ones that kids should be taught in school, given there is no “infinte time or brain space.”

“We don’t need to have a bunch of memorized definitions in our head,” McKeown says. “It’s an integration of the sentence and the word that’s going to help us. The more they have to integrate, the more that reflects what you need to do with a vocabulary as a reader.”

Ben Zimmer, executive producer of Vocabulary.com, a site with the mission of fostering and expanding vocabularies, also sees worth in the SAT changes. He is sympathetic to the College Board’s explanation that they can only test students on so many words and being able to understand the many meanings of intense is more pressing than understanding the single meaning of dilettante. “It’s necessary for them to be a little selective in what they emphasize,” he says. “You really need to appreciate the full range of meanings that a word can have.”

Zimmer, like the College Board, emphasizes that eliminating lachrymose or obsequious or punctilious from the SAT doesn’t denigrate the value of knowing such words. But it does mean that students will have to be inspired to want to know those words without necessarily getting points in return.

This is an edition of Wednesday Words, a weekly feature on language. For the previous post, click here.

http://time.com/64493/sat-vocabulary/



Edited by tatee - Apr 16 2014 at 10:40am
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SamoneLenior View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 16 2014 at 10:42am

I like the vocabulary change
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Ming View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 16 2014 at 10:44am
Originally posted by LilMissSunshine LilMissSunshine wrote:

Originally posted by Ming Ming wrote:

they changed it after I graduated... I have to explain to younger kids that my score wasn't that bad lol... they measure it out of 2400

im all no wrong answer penalties
Ming, I'm the opposite of those kids. I think they have really high scores then I have to remember that it is out of 2400, and then I'm not all that impressed.


lol... my score was actually decent and i get hit with the cause they keep changing the format

smh@ the vocab. this is why everyone uses "super" as an adjective
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Ming View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 16 2014 at 10:46am
samone, maybe im jaded. my mom used to send me to the dictionary if i asked her how to spell something... even if it was super hard
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