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Brazil and reparations : The Quilombo movement

 
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tatee View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tatee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 10 2014 at 3:23pm
smh @ them asking for proof.  i was waiting for that white woman to say slavery never happenedLOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tatee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 10 2014 at 3:25pm
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Pinto feels differently. For him, racism isn’t just about being eyed suspiciously in rich parts of town, or being told to enter through the back when he knocks on a door because people assume he’s a servant -- indignities that many black Brazilians describe experiencing.

Racism for Pinto means that his ancestors were enslaved, and that once they were freed, his grandmother was raped and his parents pushed into a slum. Racism means that after his parents turned that slum into a home, the authorities tried to make him leave, because now white people wanted to live there.

“Racism in Brazil is institutional,” Pinto said. “It’s everywhere. It’s very difficult to confront.”

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote Rumbera Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 10 2014 at 3:53pm
Great article Jp !! It shows how much we are all alike no matter the country.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Diane (35) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 10 2014 at 4:01pm
The security afforded by the family’s loose connection to the general lasted only as long as the military dictatorship itself. In 1986, a year after Brazil’s return to democracy, the cops came back to Sacopã, and this time they stayed. For one year, local authorities stationed two round-the-clock policemen outside Sacopã and locked the kitchen shut to keep the Pinto family from hosting parties or playing live music.

“They chained us up here,” José Claudio said, rattling a rusted lock that still dangles from the kitchen window. “We couldn’t do anything.”

Excuse me what?

The key to da Silva’s success was the law’s innocuous phrasing. It specifies that descendants of residents of the quilombos have a right to a permanent title to the land they occupy. But the term “quilombo” was left legally undefined for years, implying that it would be necessary for any such community to be able to trace its direct lineage to a runaway slave settlement. Most of the assembly members who voted for da Silva’s article likely viewed it as a symbolic gesture that would affect only a handful of communities.

laughs at this phrasing gaffe, it's a reminded to me too


She seems an unlikely adversary for the Pinto family as they pursue their quilombo land claim. Simas takes pride in her progressive politics. She believes racism permeates Brazilian society. And she’s known the Pintos for decades. When she married her former husband in 1989, a samba musician named Jorge Simas, they held the wedding celebration at the Pinto family home in Sacopã.

But the friendship began to fray in 1999, the year Simas was elected head of the neighborhood homeowners association. Shortly after she took her new position, Pinto walked down to her apartment and asked her to make a statement before the court in support of his family’s land claim under Brazil’s squatter right law, which they were using at the time as a defense against authorities who were trying to evict them.

Simas refused. “It was the first time over the years that I’d known him that I sensed something odd in the way he was behaving,” she said. “It’s not up to me to decide if the land is his. It’s up to him to prove if the land is his and it’s the judge’s job to decide.”

As she took greater interest in the case, she found more reasons to oppose it. The Pinto family’s claim extends across an area designated as a nature reserve, which Simas refers to as “the lung of the Zona Sul,” Rio’s ritzy southern section. In 2005, the homeowners association joined a lawsuit filed by the Public Environmental Ministry against the Pinto family and other alleged squatters, accusing them of damaging the environment.

Friends? what i tell 'all about friends lolol


The researchers who filed Sacopã’s anthropological report confirming its quilombo status in 2007 were aware that Pinto’s parents had been born in Novo Friburgo. Pinto’s parents lived an itinerant life, traveling from town to town and farm to farm in search of work before settling in the late 1920s on the hill in Lagoa where the family lives today. Pinto’s father was one of the workers who helped construct Rua Sacopã, the road that snakes up the hill.

But Pinto maintains that his grandparents had already arrived in the approximate area by the late 19th century, taking shelter in a cave lying within territory claimed by the quilombo. And while the researchers couldn’t document the presence of Pinto’s family prior to the 1920s, they wrote that the family’s stories “seem to us very likely from the point of view of historical science.”

What mattered for the anthropologists was that the Pinto family’s collective memory pointed to the existence of a group identity informed by a history of escaping slavery -- a quilombo ethnicity.

and there we have it.


Before the English left the maroons (escaped slaves and slaves set free by the Spanish to fight the British- the Spanish thought they'd be able to reclaim Jamaica lolol) got their land (3 or 4 communities  in total) and they self-gvern like Native Americans (but maroon aren't indigenous Jamaicans). I need to visit one of these days.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 10 2014 at 4:24pm
I don't like squatters. The Pinto family settled there 100 years ago. They can't prove its theirs because what the opposition wants is proof of PURCHASE, and they cannot prove they bought it.

The other people are just freeloaders.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 10 2014 at 4:27pm
Originally posted by tatee tatee wrote:

Quote 135 different terms to describe their skin color.


this would be all good if racism didnt exist but uhm this aint helpingLOL


Yes, it is racism... reversed racism. Or should I say, self-hatred.

The black people who are ashamed or don't want to believe that they are black are the ones who come up with those different terms.

When Brazil has their census, they ask people what's their race and then write it down, no questions asked.  So if someone as dark as Lebron James wants to say that they are cinnamon colored, caramel colored or some other ridiculous crap they made up in their head, the government worker has to write it down without arguing with the person that there is no such race as "caramel".


Edited by sexyandfamous - Jul 10 2014 at 4:27pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote newdiva1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2014 at 1:09am
dark white?  u gray monica? smh.


Edited by newdiva1 - Jul 11 2014 at 1:09am
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