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Black Identity and Racism Collide in Brazil

 
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Lilaca View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lilaca Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 4:07pm
Originally posted by mizzsandra00 mizzsandra00 wrote:

Originally posted by Marcelo22 Marcelo22 wrote:

Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

Not surprised as this is a problem throughout Latin America but compared to those messed up Dominicans, afro-Brazilians are like Eldgridge Cleaver, lol.

I really wanna check out the DR soon cuz I hear this a lot, folks as dark as Akon talking about "I no black papi"

I met a chick like this......black as Akon......4bzzzzz hair and she refuse to believe she was black......my yt teacher was like oh honey your blackLOLLOLLOL.....they yt was so funny.....color specialist.....all black client list and Hungarian gypsy.....I knew we would be good when she started talking about ACV and bentonite clay......LOL
Dead @ How Akon is used to describe a type of dark black. You can still be blackety black black and have mixed ancestry.... Dead

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 4:43pm
Are you guys aware that now in Brazil whites are the majority of the populationQuestion
91 million Brazilians stated they are white in the 2010 census. In Brazil there's no "one drop rule" that makes one person black if any of their ancestors is black; if they look white, they are white.

Only 15 million said they are black.....

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 4:46pm
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

But coming back to Brazil, I think they have more of a black consciousness, especially in recent years, decade. They have been pushing for rights. Rummie and Marcelo probably know more about that.




looooooooooooooooooool what rights????


eta: are you guys also aware that in Rio de Janeiro, which has a pretty big black population, black teens are forbidden to go to the mall? it is called "rolezinho" which means kinda like "hanging out".
We all know that teens love to go to the mall just 'cause, and in Brazil is the same, but since there were too many black teens going in groups to the mall, the merchants got scared and with that they forbid this kind of activity - but is not a problem if the kids are white and/or are wearing uniform from private school (which means they have money).



(cops harrassing poor teens - Sao Paulo)


(do you guys notice the cop chose the only black nearby to hit?)


Edited by sexyandfamous - Jun 17 2014 at 4:53pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 4:58pm
^^^^so now those kids are fighting back and making HUGE rolezinhos, which invites hundreds of people to malls to make a point, which leads to fights with cops, arrests, plus it makes society more angry at them, because they are seem as the problem.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JoliePoufiasse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 8:13pm
^^Yes I heard about that. But it was my understanding that an affirmative action program for university admission has finally been instituted and that it took some pushing for this to occur. Don't misunderstand me, I'm not saying they are not oppressed. they clearly are. But there seems(?) to be more of an afro-consciousness movement over there? As if they are waking up? I've seen documentaries on this. I couldn't tell you for sure as I don't know Brazil like that but that was my impression. I don't get the sense that they are as much in denial? Maybe I'm wrong. I'm comparing to what I know of the DR, I guess...

Edited by JoliePoufiasse - Jun 17 2014 at 8:17pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 9:14pm
@JP - University admission recently instituted? Oh no, that exists for over 10 years, it translates to quotes, lol, but it is called Cotas, and blacks have somewhat a priority, and so do Native Brazilians and disabled people.

Basically when they take the college test (kinda of SAT), there is some space reserved for them, and when it first came out, many people were furious because they said that if their kid got an 8 and a black kid got a 7 and got in, it was wrong and blablabla.

It is still around, and I bet a lot of whites who don't look black at all but their grandmother was black do use the cotas in order to have higher chance to get in universities.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JoliePoufiasse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 9:28pm
Originally posted by sexyandfamous sexyandfamous wrote:

@JP - University admission recently instituted? Oh no, that exists for over 10 years, it translates to quotes, lol, but it is called Cotas, and blacks have somewhat a priority, and so do Native Brazilians and disabled people.

Basically when they take the college test (kinda of SAT), there is some space reserved for them, and when it first came out, many people were furious because they said that if their kid got an 8 and a black kid got a 7 and got in, it was wrong and blablabla.

It is still around, and I bet a lot of whites who don't look black at all but their grandmother was black do use the cotas in order to have higher chance to get in universities.


10 years is recent in my book. But the point I'm making is that affirmative action of this nature would not have been instituted if afro brazilians hadn't pushed for it. That's what I mean by increased black consciousness. Prior to that, it was unthinkable. That's progress.  They had ZERO options before. Is there anything of the kind in any other latin american country? Could be but none that I'm aware of. I do know that there are people who  misuse the quota system for their own gain though but the concept of affirmative action has never been perfect anyway. It's a start, don't you think? To me, it looks like the beginnings of some type of black social consciousness amongst afro-brazilians


Edited by JoliePoufiasse - Jun 17 2014 at 9:29pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JoliePoufiasse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 9:36pm
Even culturally, there seems to be some type of black renaissance amongst afro-brazilians. They'll have organizations that include the word Afro. It's not a dirty word to them anynore like it is in a place like the DR (from the documentaries I've seen, lol). I don't have a thorough understanding of Brazil but it seems to me like they have become more conscious. Doesn't mean they're still not at the bottom of society because at the end of the day, it's white supremacy at work. But they're starting to challenge it and that's a good sign.

Just the other day, there was a piece on French tv about black associations in the favelas. It was very interesting.



Edited by JoliePoufiasse - Jun 17 2014 at 9:38pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sexyandfamous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 17 2014 at 11:11pm
Yes @black consciousness; that's probably one of the reasons why the youngsters are fighting back about this prohibition of circulating at the malls, because they wants to make a point - but sadly a lot of people with no good intentions infiltrates in the group and starts sh!t or the police harasses them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Alias_Avi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 18 2014 at 12:04am
Brazil most definitely has a growing population of Black conscious sistahs (and brothas)

Funny how one of my fav Brazilian blogs to visit wrote an article about what I just noticed today

Originally posted by <a href=http://blackwomenofbrazil.co/2014/06/15/world-cup-although-brazils-team-has-many-black-stars-the-fans-in-the-stands-are-whiter-than-norway/ target=_blank rel=nofollow>Black Women of Brazil</a> Black Women of Brazil wrote:

World Cup: Although Brazil’s team has many black stars, the fans in the stands are whiter than Norway


Brazilian fans at opening match of 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group A game

Note from BW of Brazil: So by now everyone knows that the long anticipated 2014 World Cup in Brazil has begun with the host team opening with a convincing 3-1 victory over Croatia in the Itaquerão stadium in São Paulo. As was also anticipated, superstar Neymar’s star shined even brighter as he marked two of the home team’s goals and entered the top ten list of all-time Brazilian scorers for the seleção, Brazil’s National Team. Also in typical fashion, Brazilians presented another example of the racism that everyone wants to deny but that remains part of the national character. Although the score may have been 3-1 in favor of the home team, in reality, the Brazilians scored all four goals in the game if one counts the own goal accidentally scored by Marcelo. Consistent with beliefs that only blacks make mistakes because of their race, Brazilians took to Twitter and blasted the preto (black) Marcelo for his error

An image that was even more evident of how race works in Brazil were the various shots of the crowd in Itaquerão. Sure, over the past decade or so, policies have attempted to diversify more areas of a Brazilian society dominated by the presence of persons who look as if their racial origins are purely European. As the excitement for the game reached a peak, the overwhelming whiteness of the crowd was hard to miss. As André Barcinski put it:

“If racial and cultural integration of Brazil was the main theme of the opening party, this was not reflected in the stands. The stadium was whiter than Norway. Finding a black person among the spectators was a difficult task.”

Children release doves into the air

Minutes before the game started, three children, one black, one white, one Indian, representing the origins of the Brazilian people, entered the field to release doves into the air, but one was hard pressed to find such diversity in the stands. In reality, this shouldn’t come as a surprise as in July of 2013 we covered the same issue at the Confederations Cup, also held in Brazil as well as in the official World Cup commercial and the controversy behind the selection of the World Cup Final Draw couple. In the end, one could argue that the camera did show the pride of the Brazilian people,well,  at least the European part. 

Black players, white spectators

The relationship between racial tensions (or strains) and futebol in Brazil is extensive

by Antonio Jiménez Barca with Leonardo Sakamoto

In 1914, a mulatto player of the elitist futebol club Fluminense, from Rio de Janeiro, to mask the color of his skin, smeared his face with pó de arroz meaning rice powder. In the beginning it was okay. But when he began to sweat, his trick was discovered. The player was forever marked as Pó de Arroz, as well as the club itself. The relationship between racial tensions (or strains) and futebol in Brazil is extensive.

Indeed, many historians and experts who argue that football served precisely to unite the different races that inhabit this country-continent, which is one of the few things we all do together, rich and poor, white and black, or that everyone watches together. And the seleção (meaning selection or National Team) would be the high point of this feeling of brotherhood over colors. Yes, but there are also those who say that in 1950, the goalie Barbosa, being black, was unfairly blamed for taking the definitive Ghiggia goal in the unfortunate Maracanazo. If he were white, he would have been forgiven. In the video on YouTube, we can prove that the action of Barbosa was neither a huge mistake, nor can even be categorized as an error. But tell that to the poor goalie who carried throughout life, until his death in 2000, the immense guilt of having served as an instrumental of disgrace. Even in the supermarkets he was pointed out with the finger: “Look, daughter, the man who made Brazil cry,” once said the mother to her daughter in the presence of the afflicted Barbosa.

Pelé, Garrincha and other redeemed their race and turned the Brazilian team in a mestiço (mixed race) and perfect machine capable of fabricating the best futebol in history. Since then, the seleção of Brazil was a faithful radiography of the society where over half the population is negro or mulatto.

And so it was more or less the team that entered Thursday in the Itaquerão stadium and defeated Croatia thanks to Neymar and a referee armed with the spray of a graffiti artist.

Fans at opening of World Cup

However, the stands were filled with thousands and thousands of white Brazilians, almost all white, the ones who, in their majority, have money in this country to pay admission, the ones that in general in this country, go to the movies, theater, exhibitions or to the best restaurants, those that dominate the best opportunities…

Six players on the Brazilian seleção: Dani Alves, Hulk, Thiago Silva, Luiz Gustavo Dias, Ramires and Marcelo

On the field it was easy: Marcelo, Daniel Alves, Thiago Silva, Hulk, Ramires….But look at the photos of the match and try to find a black person among the public of the stadium, dressed in yellow, cheering with elation for their seleção. Try to find some black who was not watching everyone’s seleção on television, from the outside.

The large television known as the telão in São Paulo attracts a much more diverse crowd

Note from BW of Brazil: Along these lines, the same sentiments were expressed by blogger Leonardo Sakamoto who notes that the images of the audiences in these games that are being transmitted around the world are not the face of the fans of the regular season games seen throughout the year. Those fans, most of whom simply couldn’t afford tickets, were be found in bars or in front of movie theater-sized public televisions around the country. 

Those accustomed to going to series A and B Brazilian championship games…with squadrons of Brazilians and Bolivians may find it strange when viewing the almost monochrome bleachers in the World Cup.

Please do not get me wrong. Everyone is entitled to have fun.

But as we have more rich whites than rich blacks here (a totally random fact since they “are not racist”) one might expect that this happen. Moreover, considering the stabbing that buying a ticket directly with FIFA or via the sacred institution of the peddler could be.

Listening to the radio, the announcer stated: “Look how wonderful! It’s the Brazilian family returning to the stadiums.” In fact, a specific type of family: that of a margarine commercial. For the World Cup games are a time in which the space-time fabric is torn and everything attains faces of a parallel universe – irrigated to a lot of public money and heavy actions to keep the “dangerous classes”’ away. When in doubt, bomb them.

Fans watching World Cup match on large television

Particularly I think the most nefarious immediate consequence of the presence of spectators who don’t regularly frequent the stadiums is that it doesn’t push the team as needed.

Just affirming that, in the stadium, was not the “Brazilian fans.” Not by far! The fans that come rain or shine, win or lose, is there supporting his team, live, however mediocre it is. These people, which helps our futebol to be what it is, deserve to be better represented in the Itaquerão stands.

Source: El País Brasil, R7, Blog do Sakamoto


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