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African origins of the diaspora

 
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Lite Brite View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lite Brite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 19 2014 at 3:56am
I dont even want to do DNA testing because I don't want to see any EXTRA white that I don't know about.

Sang is 33.5% Irish

I'm gonna pick Kenyan because their parents embrace me a lot more than Nigerian parents. Also anything with Guinea in the title because guinea pigs are cute (yes.. I know this is "sad")


Edited by Lite Brite - Jan 19 2014 at 3:57am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Printer_Ink Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 19 2014 at 9:02am
I think this is a nice exercise but ... I think the problem is that afer 15+ generations and almost 400 years of us living in America ... we are all mixed with so many African/European/Indian (American) groups ... that it's hardly worth the time to try to figure out where we are REALLY from.

I had the DNA test done too .. but I didn't have any male family member DNA so they could only show my material side. Basically different little countries in Africa ... which I already knew anyway.I do have a condition that my doctors says affect people of middle eastern ancestory... and yes, for sure I have a White grandmother ... but ummm not so interested any more. I think it's like trying to source my REAL last name ... it's never gonna happen.

I have visited all over Africa and absolutely no one thinks I am from THEIR country unless they are just trying to say something nice because they know AA are .. 'lost'.When I have visited the African countries where my b;ood line lies .. I don't feel 'connected' to the people or the culture at all. If just feels like I had a nice tourist trip .. but I may as well be visiting Tibet again ... if it's about feeling 'connected'.

I don't think this should held against AA and yet ANOTHER thing that AA are supposed to be feeling. Geesh.

It is what it is...

I think 99% of AAs visiting Africa would have the exact same experience. Maybe some small trait may show up but overall and bottom line is that ..... way too much time has passed and we are too mixed for this information to be really sourced ...and for it to make any difference. :(

Edited by Printer_Ink - Jan 19 2014 at 9:12am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Senior Detective Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 20 2014 at 10:01am
http://www.lipstickalley.com/showthread.php?t=577751

^this thread talks about blacks owning whites as slaves in Africa^^  its a looooong thread. if ur curious & have the patience, go for it.

their african diaspora forum http://www.lipstickalley.com/forumdisplay.php?f=328

their african forum http://www.lipstickalley.com/forumdisplay.php?f=374

their black history forum   http://www.lipstickalley.com/forumdisplay.php?f=445


idc who's mad or jealous of LSA, there is a lot of good info in the links provided.   I posted for those that want to learn

hmphhh!!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marcelo22 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 21 2014 at 10:10am
Originally posted by Oladunni Oladunni wrote:

idk how i feel about this African dna testing ... but after watching this video a while back... i kinda don't believe them..


This is the same youtube channel that promotes the theory that the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade never happened and how Black Americans are not descendants of Africans Dead
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Alias_Avi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 25 2014 at 11:49pm
My Aunt just got her DNA tested and found out she's...

69% West African (Ghana, Nigeria)
24% European (British, French)
6% Polynesian (what the hell!???)
1% Native

In her case, Gates was right Ermm


Edited by Alias_Avi - Jan 25 2014 at 11:50pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NJHairLuv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 26 2014 at 12:03am
Originally posted by JoliePoufiasse JoliePoufiasse wrote:

I just discovered a funny little tidbit about an African ethnic group that was enslaved in Haiti called the Susu (from Guinea and Sierra Leone
and this gave me the idea for this thread. I thought people from the U.S. and the Caribbean might want to list what they know about their African ancestors.

I'll start with the U.S., only because this site is U.S. based. It would be interesting if folks could give specific info about the ethnic groups within these countries

AFRICAN ORIGINS OF AFRICAN-AMERICANS

90 percent came from Senegambia (Senegal, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Mali), the Upper Guinea Coast (Sierra Leone, Guinea), the Gold Coast (Ghana), the Bight of Biafra (eastern Nigeria, Cameroon), and west-central Africa (Angola, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon). Almost half of the arriving Africans came from two areas — Senegambia and west central Africa.

In the region that my parents are from, a large amount of the enslaved people were of Angolan origin.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EPITOME Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 26 2014 at 12:13am
Originally posted by Rumbera Rumbera wrote:

India ... I've been researching my family roots but stopped earlier this year. I was just finding a whole bunch of yt French people on my dad side, my mom side is more complicated her Dad was in trouble in Haiti and fled to Cuba then changed his last name and nobody knows nada about nada. I just gave up for the moment.




Oh i didn't know you had Haitian ancestry.
I believe Nigeria because I look like one of my Nigerian friends a lot.

I'd love to do this one day. I've been talking to my soon to be 91 year old gran a bit about her family and their names and the like. I got my dad talking about why he fled Haiti too a couple months ago.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NJHairLuv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 26 2014 at 12:19am
Originally posted by hautsdeseine hautsdeseine wrote:

I wouldnt beleive the DNA test because in 400 years there have been a lot of mixture so, you can come from all the groups

Exactly. The old saying that 'America is a Melting Pot' is most applicable to Black Americans because the TransAtlantic Slave Trade had so many stops and so many routes that for one single person, one wave of ancestors could have been from West Africa, one set years later could have been from W.A. by way of the Caribbean, one wave could have been from W.A. by way of Mexico as shown on the documentary series Black in America....then the plantation may have moved from example: Virginia to South Carolina or somewhere where there is an entirely different port of origin for the slave ships...then slaves being traded and sold, passed on to heirs and sent off to never be seen again...any person's family tree is soooo complexly intertwined with other West African descendants and other people from all over the world, that the mesh will not be read in a DNA kit...the kit is reading very small samples of data in your complex mesh. Keep the money. Go do a complex family tree and look up documents on who came from where and what slave routes were in your area.  I would never buy a kit.

I know that in recent times (since the 1700s) my African roots are West African, likely partially Angolan and some on my Dad's paternal side were African by way of the Caribbean (no data on which specific islands, but verbal history) and that when I was in Senegal and The Gambia, my mom blended right in and could not be detected as a foreigner in a crowd and both of my grandfathers had facial features of people that I saw in the SeneGambia region. My dad's paternal side especially.


Edited by NJHairLuv - Jan 26 2014 at 12:33am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NJHairLuv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 26 2014 at 1:12am
Originally posted by Ivy_Grad Ivy_Grad wrote:


http://research.history.org/historical_research/research_themes/themeenslave/slavetrade.cfm

Thank you for sharing the link. My family is from NC, but some of my great-grandmother's history is based in VA.  I do a lot of research on the fluid ties btwn NC & VA families of our enslaved ancestors, families that were free landowners b4 the Civil War and also their ties with the colonists as well as the links to Melungeon populations.

I have a lot of info bookmarked on my computer, bt here is a resource for people with roots in North Carolina. Many many books & links that you can get great data from to check fr famiy names, records, land ownership, etc: http://www.encphillips.com/wiki/North_Carolina_Minorities
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NJHairLuv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 26 2014 at 1:25am
From another of my bookmarked links:
http://www.encphillips.com/wiki/Robeson_County,_North_Carolina

This is where my maternal family is from. This passage pretty much shows how a person's ancestry can be very hard to unweave b/c of the way that descendants of the enslaved people moved fluidly from region to region. Keep in mind that the 1790-1810 census that the passage refers to was during a time frame before the Emancipation Proclamation:

Robeson County, North Carolina: By the mid-eighteenth century, migrants entered the frontier area from Virginia. In the 1790-1810 censuses, descendants of these families were classified as both white (European American) and free people of color, which could include people of full and partial African and Native American descent, as well as combinations of the three. They held few slaves. Late 20th-century researchers have traced 80 percent of the free people of color in North Carolina listed in those early censuses to African Americans free in Virginia in colonial times. The families were mostly descended from white women (which is what gave them free status so early) and men who were African or African American. In addition, some African male slaves had been freed in Virginia as early as the mid-17th century. They founded free families of several generations before migrating to other areas. In the early years of the southern colonies, working-class whites and Africans lived and worked closely together, marrying and forming unions. Many free people of color migrated to frontier areas to gain relief from the racial strictures of the coastal areas.

Edited by NJHairLuv - Jan 26 2014 at 1:29am
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