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$4,000yr to raise a child in Canada

 
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miana79 View Drop Down
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    Posted: Aug 22 2013 at 11:41am

Is raising a child easier financially than ever before?

 
Raising a child in Canada only costs $3,000-$4,000 a year, the Fraser Institute says, a far cry from some studies that have put the annual expense per child in the $10,000-$15,000 range.
Raising a child in Canada only costs $3,000-$4,000 a year, the Fraser Institute says, a far cry from some studies that have put the annual expense per child in the $10,000-$15,000 range. (Todd Korol/Reuters
 
 

The Fraser Institute says it's never been easier financially to raise a child in Canada, with the annual cost much lower than many believe, a finding criticized by some who argue the think-tank fails to account for the cost of daycare.

The conservative public policy institute, in a report released Thursday, says it is possible to raise a child on about $3,000 to $4,000 a year, and even less if parents only include necessary expenses and are careful with their dollars.Confused

That is a far cry from some studies that have put the annual expense per child in the $10,000 to $15,000 range — with the total bill for raising a child to age 18 at more than $200,000.

However, the Fraser Institute's paper says the higher numbers are discouraging for lower-income Canadians, who might come away with the conclusion they cannot afford to have children.

But many lower-income people can and do raise healthy children, says the paper, authored by economist Christopher Sarlo.

Few frills included by Fraser

Sarlo concedes his lower estimate is based on the cost of providing a child's essential needs, such as food, clothing, personal care, household supplies, recreation and school supplies.

Very few frills are included in the Fraser total, including no allowance for daycare or lost income if one parent decides to stay home to take care of the children.

In an interview with CBC News, Don Giesbrecht, CEO of the Ottawa-based Canadian Child Care Federation, said: “Families are absolutely stretched to their financial maximum."

According to Giesbrecht, 70 per cent of Canadian moms are in the workforce, making child care a necessity for many families.

“It’s not a superficial cost that affects a minority of people,” he said.

The daily cost of daycare ranges from $7 in Quebec and $20 in Manitoba, to about $70 in some provinces, Giesbrecht said, so it is not uncommon for families to spend close to $20,000 a year on daycare.

Sarlo said the exclusion of daycare is not because it is not a legitimate expense but because the majority of parents have zero child-care costs, saying the item is best treated as a special expense for families for whom it applies. That cost alone, however, would more than double the Fraser annual estimate for those families.

The paper also notes that some affluent parents no doubt spend plenty of money on their children — for music lessons, trips to Disney World, expensive clothing, elaborate toys and games, and on education, including private school.

But these expenses are not needed in order to raise a healthy child at socially acceptable standards, the paper argues.

In truth, Sarlo says, it has never been financially easier to raise a child in Canada because the necessities represent a smaller portion of family income, real incomes are higher, there are more dual income families, and couples are having fewer children than ever before.

But Giesbrecht suggests that Canadian parents need to review the report with caution, and be realistic about the real cost. Many families, struggling with debt, are delaying having children until they become more financially stable.

"It's a harsh reality for many," he said

 
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SamoneLenior View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SamoneLenior Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 22 2013 at 11:47am

bullsh*t

for all the caveats mentioned in the article
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miana79 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote miana79 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 22 2013 at 2:47pm
Originally posted by SamoneLenior SamoneLenior wrote:


bullsh*t

for all the caveats mentioned in the article
 
I know right, Iull live there and this is some bull crap...
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Ladycoils View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ladycoils Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 22 2013 at 3:37pm
Maybe everyone should drop their kids off at the conservative public policy institute and see how many people fall within the minority range they talked about.
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