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SoutherNtellect View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SoutherNtellect Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2013 at 4:28pm
Originally posted by missyo67 missyo67 wrote:

Try cutting out the lights earlier (dusk) or wearing sunglasses inside (ala Jack Kruse).  This helps reset your circadian clock.  I was doing good for a while but I moved my wifi into bedroom.  That little bitty light annoys me between 1-3am.  I'm usually in bed by 10pm.  I average (SleepBot) about 7-7.5hrs) but I do wake at 3am (bathroom) but I go back to sleep (still a sleep disruptions).

Also, last meal/food must be minimum of 4 hours before bedtime (guilty) in order to start the detoxification/serontonin release that needs to occur.
 
I just ate my last "meal".....  I will have a Protein Smoothie after the gym (trying something new) This is the first time I've felt "full" during this time of day. This is normally my "high risk" time. 

adding this one too. i always have lights on
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote madame pink Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2013 at 4:29pm
Here is some info I found on protein before bed. If anyone has a moment to read.

How soon before bed should I drink protein? Right before, or a specific number of minutes before before I actually go to sleep? Thanks! — Bob

The issue here is less about the timing of when to take protein before bed, as it is what kind of protein to take before you go to sleep.

You should try to consume your last serving of protein as close to your bedtime as is comfortable for you. Whether that’s a protein shake before bed, or a whole food souce of protein before sleep is up to you.

Some people experience no problems eating and then immediately going to sleep, while other people find sleeping on a “full stomach” uncomfortable. If you find that taking a protein-heavy snack right before bed interferes with falling asleep, then give yourself at least 30-40 minutes between the snack and bedtime.



The idea here is to simply get some slow-digesting amino acids into you before you go to bed, since you’ll essentially be in a fasted-state overnight. This can help blunt catabolism (muscle breakdown) during the nighttime hours. This is even more important if you are exercising in the evening.

Your protein and energy requirements during sleep will be less than during the day, so even if you eat your snack 60 minutes before bed (consuming between 20-30 grams of slower digesting protein) you should have plenty of protein to get you through the night.

So I wouldn’t sweat the timing of when to take protein before bed too much.

What’s the Best Source of Protein To Take Before Bed?  

There are really four optimal times during the day to take in extra protein:

  1. In the morning when you first wake up
  2. 60-90 minutes before your workout
  3. Immediately after your workout
  4. Before bed 

In the first three instances, whey protein is generally your best bet because it is rapidly digested by your body and makes amino acids quickly available at the time you most need them — in the morning when you are essentially waking up from a 7 hour fast, before you workout, and right after you exercise.

But the protein before bed is different.

Since you’ll won’t be eating for 6-8 hours (depending on your sleep patterns, of course) you’ll want to actually slow down the absorption of protein while you sleep, ensuring you have enough to get your through the extended “fast.”

You can do this a couple of ways.

  1. You can switch the type of protein you are eating. While whey is digested fairly quickly (within 90 minutes of consumption, depending on the foods you eat with it) other sources of protein take longer for the body to break down and make available. These include things like protein from meat, fish and the king of long-digesting proteins: casein.
  2. Eat other foods along with your protein that slow digestion.Whether you choose casein, whey protein or chicken breast as a pre-bedtime snack, you can slow the digestion of any protein by consuming other foods with it, like dietary fat and/or fiber.  Eating some healthy fats that are high in MUFAs, such as nuts or nut butters, along with your protein before bed can extend the digestion period and cause the protein to be absorbed more slowly.

Casein versus Whey or Meats Before Bed

Casein protein is the what you’ll hear bodybuilders typically recommend as a good protein to take before bed. 

Casein is one of two primary proteins in milk (whey is the other.) While whey is admired because it is rapidly digested in the body — making it ideal for a post-workout recovery drink — casein is the exact opposite.

When casein protein hits the stomach it curdles — slowing down the bio-availability of the amino acids. Eventually, your body will digest the majority of the proteins in casein, but it takes time — between 6-8 hours.

While this wouldn’t be optimal immediately following a workout, it’s ideal before bed. Think of casein as an overnight “protein drip” when you are in bed.

Casein Protein Powder or Whole Food Sources Before Bed?

Casein protein can be bought in a powdered form like whey protein or soy protein isolate, but you can also just as easily get it by eating whole food sources of casein protein before you go to bed — things like skim milk, yogurt, quark, cottage cheese or kefir.

In fact, both milk and cottage cheese are excellent sources of whey and casein protein. For example, a one cup serving of low-fat cottage cheese has 24 grams of protein — the majority of which is the slow-digesting casein variety. This is about equal to a single scoop of casein protein powder.

My point here isn’t to discourage you from using casein powder or drinking a protein shake before sleep, but rather to let you know that there are other “whole” clean eating foods that you can eat before bedtime that may be just as effective — and probably less expensive, tastier and more enjoyable than a scoop of casein.

What If I’m Lactose Intolerant?

If you have a dairy allergy, casein may not work for you.

In those cases, you’ll probably have to use other sources of slower-digesting proteins from things like meat, poultry or fish before bed. You could also experiment around with soy protein isolate or egg protein, and slow the digestion by consuming some healthy fats along with it. Eating fibrous vegetables alongside the protein and healthy fats can also help slow digestion.

Under these circumstances, a good pre-bedtime protein snack might be bowl of tuna salad with some light mayo and a handful of almonds or nuts. In general, even when consuming sources of casein protein like cottage cheese before bed, eating some nuts or natural peanut butter along with it is a good practice.



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missyo67 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote missyo67 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2013 at 4:34pm
This sleep thing has me investigating........  My sleep has been "off" since December.....
 
 

WHY SLEEP AND LEPTIN ARE YOKED?

June 24, 2011 by Jack Kruse Comments (37)

READERS SUMMARY:

1. How does sleep begin?
2. Is there a disease that helps us understand how diet and sleep are linked?
3. Neuroanatomical reasons to reject the “set point” theory of obesity.
4. Why is addiction, metabolism and sleep all linked?
5. Did you know that one cause of central leptin resistance maybe autoimmune damage similar to celiac?

 

 

To begin to understand how sleep interacts with metabolism, we need to understand a bit about neuroanatomy.  In sleep, the cerebral cortex is in a  state of cortical synchronization.  In wakefulness several subcortical regions of the brain stimulate the cortex to remove this synchronization.  When we undergo slow wave Non REM sleep (drowsiness) there are a small group of neurons in the hypothalamus called VLPO neurons that are GABAergic (inhibitory) and they fire on the subcortical areas that are stimulating the cortex.  In doing so, these VLPO neurons bring about cortical synchronization.  After sleep begins, NREM sleep gives way to REM sleep.  During REM sleep there is a coordination of cross talk between the grey matter brainstem nuclei while cortical synchronization is maintained.  This is quite complex coordination of events that occurs in the brain while we sleep.  A common disease of dis-coordination of sleep is Narcolepsy.  In other words, the tracts that normally control the stages of sleep occur out of sequence and cause people to fall asleep and lose muscle control in wakefulness.  Narcolepsy occurs because we lose a specific set of neurons in the hypothalamus that effects this coordination of signals.  These neurons are called the hypocretin neurons (HC).  These neurons are found in the ventral lateral hypothalamus in a small area that also control appetite and feeding.  These neurons also effect loops that effect feeding.  There is no set point.  When we lose HC neurons we set up the neurochemistry that becomes resistant obesity.  The dopamine tracts are the direct targets of the HC neurons.  We don’t see obesity as a common phenotype when we see tumors of surgical ablation of these dopamine outflow tracts.  This is the main reason many do not believe there is a set point for obesity.  The hypocretin neurons sit scattered through many MSH cells (also involved in obesity).  The HC neurons make two peptides called (hypocretin 1 and 2)HCrT1 and HCrT2.  In the literature, these peptide hormones are also known as the orexins so you do not get confused.  These peptides are remarkably similar to gut incretin hormones that help tell the brain what type of foods are present in the gut.  Another remarkable trait of the hypocretin neurons is that in the human brain there is only 50,000 total HC neurons in an organ with over one trillion cells.  And they appear to be very new in mammalian phylogeny.  It appears mammals handle sleep and energy metabolism very differently than the rest of the living.  The small amount of HC neurons, however, project widely all over the brain.  We now know that the hypocretin neurons control the stability of wakefulness or our arousal.  It appears they may also control energy metabolism via leptin function.

 

The HC neurons also stimulate appetite.  So they control two vital behaviors in humans simultaneously.  This is called pleiotrophic behavior of the neuropeptides.  This is where the story gets interesting between sleep, metabolism, and addiction.  The HC neurons are excited by Leptin, glucose, and gherlin hormones.  They are also stimulated by NPY, NYY, and Cortisol releasing factor (a glucocorticoid).  Remember that high cortisol levels chronically are generally a bad thing for the brain.  We saw that in my Hormone 101 blog in relation to obesity and leptin resistance.  Leptin resistance long term ALWAYS leads to hyper- cortisolism.  This also increases the excitation of the HC neurons.  Drug addiction also begins with hyper-cortisolism and causes the nucleus accumbens to make higher amounts of dopamine while the rests of out brain has lower levels of serotonin.  Obesity begins with inflammation but once it is firmly established in  humans they become centrally leptin resistant.  Long term this causes high cortisol levels to be made chronically as well.  Those high levels of cortisol appear to knockout HC neurons where leptin signal transduction occurs in the brain.  This effect maybe mediated by a leaky gut due to molecular mimicry.  In effect we become centrally leptin resistant.

 

Take a look at this video to crystalize this point.  Video

 

The outflow of the HC neurons directly feeds to the dopamine tracts and receptors that were thrown about (Median forebrain bundle and ventral segmental area) in Stephen Guyenet’s series on food reward.  They also are excitatory to the Acetylcholine  tracts of the pre frontal cortex and to histaminergic system in the brain.  While I enjoyed Stephen’s series, I think it missed the obesity target because it did not focus in on the effect of leptin on the small numbers of HC neurons.  This is precisely where central leptin resistance effects are felt.  Leptin resistance knocks out hypocretin neuronal function.  There is also current research being done to see if the effects of chronically lowering hypocretin neuron numbers could cause a lack of coordination of tracts involving leptin function and food seeking behavior.  This has biologic plausibility because their exists another human disease with hypocretin neuron losses effect its targeted behavior.  That disease is Narcolepsy-cataplexy.

 

It appears that leptin, and other metabolic cues,  stimulate the 50,000 HC cells to lead to a coordinated response in the arousal centers of the brain.  This has huge implications for sleep, eating and drug seeking behavior.  George Koob is a very famous addiction researcher found that when he placed mice in an operant conditioning cage with an active button that delivered a cocaine dose and an inactive one that did not, the animals learned to push the cocaine button quickly.  The behavior of pressing the active button was then extinguished to cocaine but yolked to cues that could be described as drug seeking behavior in the mice.  This learning occurred quickly.  Then, Luis de Lecea from Stanford University, tested these animals with HCrT1 peptide instead of cocaine and he found that HCrT1 also caused continuation of drug seeking behaviors without any cocaine in the experiment.  Moreover, the infusion of HCrT1 peptide also caused the animals to have higher levels of cortisol present which also seemed to independently drive their drug seeking behaviors without any cocaine being present.  A second experiment was done to see if an HCrT1 receptor antagonists would diminish the drug seeking behavior and diminish the stress response.  This is precisely what occurred in the Stanford experiments.

 

It is also well known in psychiatry and sleep literature that  patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy are extremely resistant to all forms of drug abuse but not to obesity!  It is clear that the HC neurons are extremely important in energy balance and sleep.  It appears this is the tract in the brain where dual control funnels down to.  It also helps explain why most people who are obese also tend to have central sleep apnea.  Central administration of orexin A/hypocretin-1 strongly promotes wakefulness, increases body temperature, locomotion, and elicits a strong increase in energy expenditure.  This is what one sees in extreme leptin sensitivity with UCP1 and UCP3 uncoupling.  Sleep deprivation also increases orexin A/hypocretin-1 transmission. The orexin/hypocretin system may thus be more important in the regulation of energy expenditure than food intake. In fact, orexin/hypocretin-deficient narcoleptic patients have increased obesity rather than decreased BMI, as would be expected if orexin/hypocretin were primarily an appetite stimulating peptide.   In humans, narcolepsy is associated with a specific variant of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. Furthermore, genome-wide analysis shows that, in addition to the HLA variant, narcoleptic humans also exhibit a specific genetic mutation in the T-cell receptor alpha locus. In conjunction, these genetic anomalies cause the autoimmune system to attack and kill the critical hypocretin neurons. Hence the absence of hypocretin-producing neurons in narcoleptic humans may be the result of an autoimmune disorder.  This could occur via a defect in molecular mimicry as seen in the leaky gut due to toll receptor proteins.  Similar mechanisms are seen in Celiac disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Crohn’s disease, and psychiatric disorders such as GAPS.

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missyo67 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote missyo67 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2013 at 4:39pm
Originally posted by madame pink madame pink wrote:

Missy I can only dream at being sleep by 10. I am shooting for 11. However I always have to get up to go to the bathroom. But do go right back to sleep. 
I don't think 11 is bad.  I believe getting the deepest restful sleep for 7-8 hours is most important.  Also, your work from home schedule probably allows for less time commuting and more for continuous sleep. 
I like the protein information you posted.  I JUST bought some new whey protein.  I would use JayRobb sporatically but bought this with my upgraded coffee. http://www.upgradedself.com/upgraded-whey.html

Edited by missyo67 - Jan 31 2013 at 4:44pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote madame pink Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2013 at 4:58pm
More sleep since I have gotten over that bad hump of insomnia. Dont know about continuous. I cannot sleep straight through the night. I have to go to the bathroom and I am a very light sleeper. If the dog licks her paws I can hear her all the way up on my bed in my sleep. I hate that small sounds wake me up so easily. Not to mention I sleep weird. I cannot fall asleep without the sound of a fan or something that mimics it closely. Since I was young. Cry


Edited by madame pink - Jan 31 2013 at 4:59pm
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SoutherNtellect View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SoutherNtellect Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2013 at 8:13pm
so now i don't know if should stop eating at 6, or have a little protein before bed Wacko so i had a little protein shake but i was too full to drink it. i'll try to have some more when i get in bed 


i've also been doing intermittent fasting, eating from 11am - 7pm only, but i've read a lot of articles this this may be better for men than women.

science is so confusing. don't know why i majored in it 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote missyo67 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2013 at 10:19pm
I have been reading on IF too. My old trainer (www.leangains.com) built his entire program around this.  However, I had a difficult time adhering to it and trying to do too many other things. I think on HCG IF is a good thing.  I have my coffee in the morning (sip for 1-2 hrs) then eat by 2pm.  I think I need to adjust my timing.  I had my protein shake late due to my late workout. There are no carbs in my protein (1g) so I should be ok.  Southern listen to your body and adjust accordingly.
Here is what I referenced.... gotta study more. http://www.bulletproofexec.com/a-bad-combination-for-women-intermittent-fasting-and-paleo/

Edited by missyo67 - Jan 31 2013 at 10:24pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote madame pink Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 8:21am
VLC 11
-1.2
total -13.4
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SoutherNtellect Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 10:52am
few updates

sleep - I cut off the living room light early last night and used lamps instead. all lights and TV went off when I got in bed. i did wake up twice last night. but the first time was my stupid neighbor making noise @1am. the second was to go potty @ 5am (as opposed to the usual 3-4am). easily went back to sleep both times. overall improvement

weight - vlcd 32. +1. [total 20] (I think it's because I put coconut oil in my coffee yesterday to get things going + TOM.  I also went out to eat yesterday and had steak/shrimp/broccoli. I seasoned it myself. But I did add about 2tbs of their tomato sauce. and although they grill it, they might have added some oil while cooking.
7 days, 22hours left. still shooting for 5 more lbs. measurements maintaining

Non Scale Victory - tried on another shirt that previously didn't fit. it was baggy and gave me no shape. So today i'm wearing a size Large Bebe top (I was wearing 1x, sometimes 2x)
one more. i still need to lose more in my face and neck but i'm no longer horrified by pictures of me


Edited by SoutherNtellect - Feb 01 2013 at 11:22am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote missyo67 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 01 2013 at 11:22am
Awesome Southern!!!
Way to Rock Madame Pink!!
 
 
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